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Sunday, July 26, 2015

Philippine Fisheries Scientists and Other Articles on Philippine Fisheries

Book



Filipino Fisheries Scientists





By












Melchor F. Cichon




Introduction
 As of today, no book on the profile of Filipino fisheries scientists has been published. Hence this works is historical.
It includes 35 Filipino fisheries scientists and one American who significantly helped in the development of  Philippine fisheries science.







Copyright Page
c2009
2015

Dedication
This book is dedicated to my wife and to our children, Melchor, Jr., Vanessa, Ranel Vincent, and Eugene. Also to our in-laws: Jennifer and Ruel, and to our granddaughter: Sean Marie.

Suggested Bibliographical Entry






Table of Contents

Dr. Albert Herre: A Pioneer in Philippine Fisheries Science                                  .5
Commissioner Andres M. Mane                                                                             7
Agustin F. Umali                                                                                                    8
Dr. Herminio R. Rabanal                                                                                        9
Dean Dominador K. Villaluz                                                                                  12
Claro T. Martin                                                                                                       15
Silvestre V. Bersamin                                                                                             18
Santos B. Rasalan                                                                                                   19
Jose S. Domantay                                                                                                   20
Dr. Deogracias V. Villadolid                                                                                  23
Nazario A. Pidlaoan                                                                                                26
Prof. Zosima Vicencio                                                                                            28
Margarita Manibay de la Torre-de la Cruz                                                              29
Dr. Lourdes A. Dureza                                                                                           30
Dr. Carmen C. Velasquez                                                                                       31
Dr. Arsenio S. Camacho                                                                                         32
Dr. Carlos C. Baylon                                                                                              33
Dr. Minda J. Formacion                                                                                          35
Dr. Jesus Juario                                                                                                      37
Dr. Ida M. Siason                                                                                                   43
Dr. Alice Joan G. Ferrer                                                                                         45
Dr. Rodolfo B. Baldevarona                                                                                   48
Dr. Riza O. Aguilar                                                                                                 51
Teodoro U. Abalos                                                                                                 52
Dr. Emilia Tobias-Quinitio                                                                                      56
Prof. Pepito M. Fernandez                                                                                      60
Erlinda S. Ganzon-Naret                                                                                         63
Dr. Glenn D. Aguilar                                                                                              64
Dr. Benjamen Jareta Gonzales                                                                                68
Dr. Rafael D. Guerrero III                                                                                      73
Dr. Rogelio O. Juliano                                                                                            78
Guillermo L. Ablan                                                                                                 83
Prof. Prudencia V. Conlu                                                                                        86
Dr. Liberato V. Laureta                                                                                           88
The Author                                                                                                              Back cover







Dr. Albert Herre: A Pioneer in Philippine Fisheries Science
By
Melchor F. Cichon
Otolith, October-December 1986, pp. 11-12
When I asked some UPV College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences undergraduate students about Albert Herre, they thought he was a freshman student of the College or of the College of arts and Sciences. One student even ventured to ask me whether Herre is staying at the UPV Dormitory.
From their responses, I deduced that Dr. Albert Herre is a stranger to present fisheries students. This led me to look for some information about him. I was glad that Prof. Prudencia Conlu was still around. She is one of our renowned ichthyologists who had the opportunity to talk personally with Herre. It was from her that I learned much about the man.
Dr. Albert William Christian Theodore Herre came to the Philippines in 1920 and became the first Chief of the Department of Fisheries, Bureau of Science, Philippine Islands, from 1920 to 1928. After this, he returned to the United States of America for one year. But in 1931, he came back to the Philippines to survey the fisheries resources of the country and returned to the United States again. In 1933, he was again back as part of the expeditions in Pelews, Philippines, China and Malay Peninsula.
While in the Philippines, he extensively toured the archipelago. In his preface to his book, Stories of Philippine Fishes, he said, “For many years it has been my privilege and delight to travel in all parts of the Philippines, to wander over all the large islands and to visit most of the inhabited islands and many, many on which no one lives. Many long and often difficult trips were taken in order to learn something of the fishes, coral reefs and mountain lakes, of the great rivers of Luzon and Mindanao, and of the bays, channels and seas that surround the thousands of lovely islands that lie between Formosa and Borneo. In the esteros about Malabon and Lake Buhi, may be found the smallest fishes in the world, while in the sea not far from Sibutu, I have seen the whale shark, the largest fish in the world swimming about the surface of the water. To learn more about fishes, I have watched them day after day, drifting in a banca, and have examined thousands, living and dead. They were obtained from baklad and bobo; fishing from pantalans, taken from tide pools and the open sea; and from rice paddies, rivers, and lakes all over the islands.”
Out of these expeditions and travels, he produced various scientific papers and books on Philippine fishes. The “Bibliography of Fishes and Fisheries” compiled by Guillermo J. Blanco and Heraclio R. Montalban (Philippine Journal of Fisheries, vol. 1, no. 2, July-December 1951, pp. 115-138) lists 102 of Herre’s original articles on Philippine fisheries. The earliest article he wrote about the Philippine fisheries is entitled “Aquatic Resource of the Philippines”. It was published in the American Chamber of Commerce Journal, Manila 1(1921):11-12.
In 1925 in Malabon, Rizal, Herre also described and published the discovery of the smallest fish in the world—the Pandaca pygmea which measures 7.5 to 11 mm in length when fully mature. At that time he was working with Filipino scientists like Inocencio Ronquillo, Agustin Umali, Guillermo Montalban, Claro Martin, Hilario Roxas, etc. It was Ronquillo who gave him the Pandaca pygmea specimen.
Other significant contribution of Herre to the study of Philippine fishes is his book, Checklist of Philippine Fishes (Washington, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1953. 976p.). This book is not the first checklist of Philippine fishes because in 1910, David Starr Jordan and R. E. Richardson prepared a list which included 830 species. But this book by Herre is considered as the most comprehensive list of Philippine fishes until today.
This book is still being used by our fisheries researchers as a preliminary reference. It includes approximately 2, 145 species of fishes known to inhabit the waters of the Philippines in 1948.
The other technical books by Herre include: Gobies of the Philippines and the China Sea (Manila Bureau of Printing, 1927. 352p.), and English and Local Common Names of Philippine Fishes (Washington, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1948. 128p.). The first book describes the sizes, color and inhabitants of hundreds of Philippine gobies. The Pandaca pygmea is described in this book.
He did not only write technical books and articles. Two of his works are Stories of Philippine Fishes (Manila, D. P. Perez Co., 1938) and Philippine Fish Tales (Rizal, Oriental Commercial Co., 1935) which showcase his literary skills. Some of his poems are found in the first book.
Herre was born on September 16, 1868 in Toledo, Ohio, U.S.A. He earned his undergraduate (A.B., 1904), graduate (A.M., 1905), and Ph.D. (1909) degree in Stanford University, California.
After graduation, he served as principal of a high school in California (1910-1912), then as director of the School of Hygiene in the same institution from 191901920. After this, he went to the Philippines and began his long career in fisheries. He was a member of four expeditions from 1928 to 1937. He was also a member of scientific associations like California Academy and California Botany Society.
After his duty in the Philippines, Herre went back to America. He wanted to visit the Philippines again sometime in 1962 or 1963 but a certain illness prevented him from doing so.
This greatly disappointed the Filipino scientists who wanted to see again the man who contributed much to the advancement of fisheries science in the Philippines. However, the great legacy left by Herre comforted and inspired them to work toward the development of Philippine fisheries.



Commissioner Andres M. Mane: A Pillar of Philippine Fisheries Industry
By
Melchor F. Cichon
August 31, 2006

Because of Kanduli (Arius manilensis (Umali, 1936), the young Andres M. Mane switched his interest from agriculture to fisheries.
Kanduli is a native catfish found in Laguna de Bay.
Andres Mane was born in Mayondon, Los Baños, Laguna.
Being a bright pupil, Andres jumped from elementary to college, without passing through high school.
He enrolled at the U.P . College of Agriculture in Los Baños, Laguna and finished two degrees. The University of the Philippines Alumni Directory (1970, p. 698) says Mane finished :Bachelor of Agriculture in 1929 and a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture in 1932.
Through the suggestion of Dr. Deogracias Villadolid, Mane studied the spawning of kanduli at Laguna de Bay for his thesis. The result of his study, "Preliminary study of the life history and habits of kanduli (Arius sp.) in Laguna de Bay, Philippines", was published in Philippine Agriculture.
This was the turning point of his career and he retired from the government services as a Commissioner of the Philippine Fisheries Commission in 1972.
After his graduation from college, he worked in several government offices. He worked as scientific fishery assistant and deputy warden at the Fish and Game Administration of the Bureau of Science.
He served as the first Superintendent of the Philippine Institute of Fisheries Technology, the first fisheries school in the Philippines and the forerunner of the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, UP in the Visayas. He was also responsible for the establishment of other fisheries schools in the Philippines.
Commissioner Mane worked at the National Economic Council (NEC), now NEDA, where he got his training on economics. He then served as Chief National Planner in Agriculture including fisheries and helped draft the First Comprehensive Socio-Economic Development Program of the then Pres. Diosdado Macapagal.
From NEC, he was hired as Acting Commissioner of the Philippine Fisheries Commission until his retirement in 1972.
He then worked as consultant for the SEAFDEC-AQD in Tigbauan, Iloilo, after which he worked as chairman of the Board of the Rural Bank of Paete, and as Director of the Rural Bank of Mabitac.
As a commissioner, Mane attended four international conferences namely: the 14th Session of the FAO in Rome, Italy on November 4-23, 1967; Inaugural meeting of the Council of Southeast Asian fisheries Development Center at Bangkok; International Seminar sponsored by the German Foundation for Developing Countries held at Berlin-Tegel, Germany, September –October 1968; and the 13th Council Meeting of the Indo-Pacific Fisheries Council held at Brisbane, Australia from October 14, 1968.
Probably because of his administrative positions, Commissioner Mane had very few (6) publications.
Below is the list of his publications on fisheries:
Mane, A. M. and D. K. Villaluz. 1939. The pukot fisheries of Laguna de Bay. Phil. Journ. Sci. 69:397-413.
Mane, A. M. and Mariano A. Abagon. 1950. A survey of fisheries educational institutions. Bull Fish. Soc. Phil. 1:20-26.
Mane, Andres M. 1929. Preliminary study of the life history and habits of kanduli (Arius sp.) in Laguna de Bay. Philippines Agri. 18(2):21-117
Mane, Andres M. 1937. Spawning and feeding habits of ayungin, Misopristes plumbea Kner, a common theraponid in Laguna de Bay. Philippine Agri. 23 (6):502-513.
Mane, Andres M. 1981. Management and maintenance of fishpens in Laguna de Bay. In REPORT OF THE TRAINING COURSE ON SMALL-SCALE PEN AND CAGE CULTURE FOR FINFISH by Guerrero, R.D. III, Soesanto, V. Series title: Project reports (not in a Series) - SCS/GEN/82/34 1982 p. 262 pg
Villadolid, D. V. A. M. Mane, and B. Ongchangco. 1941. Opportunities in Philippine fisheries. Dept. Agri and Com. Year Book for 1940, pp. 701-710.
Sources:
Anonymous. October, 1968. The reigning triumvirate at the Fisheries Commission. The Fisheries Gazette, October 1968, pp. 6-8.
Tolentino, Angelina M. A legacy for fisheries. PCAMRD Waves, April-June 1997, p.8.

Agustin F. Umali: A Distinguished Filipino Ichthyologist
Melchor F. Cichon
First Published in Otolith, January-March 1997, p. 16
Mr. Agustin F. Umali is the author of one of the most significant books on Philippine fishes, Edible Fishes of Manila (Manila, Bureau of Printing, 1936). This is the first book on Philippine fishes that provides the local and scientific names, distinctive features, colors, sizes, supply and marketing conditions, eating qualities, and illustrations of Philippine fishes that were sold in the different markets in Manila before World War II. In 1938, he co-authored English and Local Names of Philippine Fishes with Dr. Albert W. Herre. He also authored the classical book on the different fishing gears used in the Philippines, Guide to the Classification of Fishing Gears in the Philippines in 1950.
All these books are still being used by Filipino fisheries and marine researchers and students. Aside from these, Umali published more than 20 scientific articles on Philippine fishes and fisheries mostly in the Philippine Journal of Science.
This is the reason why the University of the Philippines in the Visayas named the Faculty Center of the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences as Agustin Umali Hall. This is a fitting tribute to a distinguished man who rendered so much of his time and talent for the development of fisheries in the Philippines.
Umali was born in Odiongan, Romblon on January 15, 1906. His parents were Mariano Umali and Leoncia Fallaria. He finished his Associate in the Arts at the University of the Philippines, where he also earned his Bachelor of Science degree in 1928.
After graduation, Umali taught at the Zambales Provincial High School from 1928 to 1929. He then transferred to the Bureau of Science in 1929 where he stayed until 1936 as an Assistant Ichthyologist. From the Bureau of Science, he worked as District Fisheries Officer in Naga, Camarines Sur from 1936 to 1938. In 1939 until the start of World War II, Umali worked as Assistant Ichthyologist at the Division of Fisheries, Department of Agriculture and Commerce.
His service in the government continued even during the war. In 1942-43, he worked as an Aquatic Biologist at the bureau of Forestry and Fishery. He transferred to the Office of the President as Supervisor (Fisheries) Food Administration from 1943 to 1944.
His love for education led him to the Philippine School of Fisheries from 1944-1945, and from 1946-1948, as its Superintendent. From the Philippine School of Fisheries, he transferred to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Rehabilitation Office, Manila from 1948 to 1950. He became Chief of the Geology Paleontology Division, National Museum from 1950 until 1960.
In between these jobs, Umali was sent to various trainings here and abroad. In 1938-1939, he was sent by the Philippine government on deep-sea fishing. In the Philippines, he attended a special training on cooperative at the Department of Agriculture and Commerce at the Institute of Public Administration (now the College of Public Administration, University of the Philippines in 1953-54.
It was during his stay in these various government organizations that he was able to produce a lot of scientific papers, pamphlets and books on Philippine fishes and fisheries. He was also able to attend scientific meetings like the Indo-Pacific Fisheries, 4th Meeting where he served as adviser in 1952. In the following year, he was able to attend the 8th Pacific Science Congress and in 1962, he participated in the UNESCO Marine Science Institutions in East and Southeast Asia meeting in Manila.
Umali was a member of learned societies and organizations like the National research Council of the Philippines and the American Society of Ichthyology and Herpetology. He was the founding fellow of the Philippine Association for the Advancement of Science.
Because of his significant contributions in the field of fisheries, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Plague by the Philippine Association for the Advancement of Science in 1961.
All these speak of a man worthy to be honored and remembered by his colleagues in the field of fisheries and even by future generations.



Dr. Herminio R. Rabanal: Filipino Fisheries Scientist at the Forefront

By

Melchor F. Cichon
August 23, 2006

The pamphlet prepared by the SEAFDEC-AQD Library in 1999 lists 208 publications authored and co-authored by Dr. Herminio R. Rabanal. It includes technical, semi-technical and popular papers on aquaculture, fisheries biology and related subjects.
This reflects his varied talents, expertise, and exposures to various activities as a fisheries scientist and administrator
Dr. Rabanal was born on September 20, 1917 in Alaminos, Pangasinan to Vicente Rabanal and Elena Ranit.
In 1948, he married Eufronia A. Durvin and they were blessed with two children: Mario and Andrea.
He finished his Bachelor of Fisheries (Fish Culture) at the University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City in 1940; his Master in Science (Marine Biology) at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA in 1948; and his Ph. D. (Fisheries Management) at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, USA in 1960.
He had a special training on personnel management at the U.P. Institute of Public Administration, in 1954.
After graduation from college and from post-graduate studies, he worked in several agencies, both in the Philippines and abroad. From the pamphlet prepared by SEAFDEC-AQD and from his bio-data, we got this information about his work experiences:
1941-1942--Assistant Curator of the Fish Collection, Natural History, Museum Division, Department of Commerce.
1943-1944--Fish Culturist, Dagat-Dagatan Experimental Station, Bureau of Fisheries
1945-1946--Junior Scientist at the National Museum
1946-1967—from Fishery Officer to Chief of the Fish Culture Section of the Philippine Institute of Fisheries Technology
1967-1972—Fishery Officer (Inland Fisheries and Aquaculture), fisheries Department, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, Italy.
1968-1973—Co-editor, FAO Aquaculture Bulletin, Rome, Italy
1972-1974—Regional Aquaculture Adviser, FAO Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific (RAPA), Bangkok, Thailand
1984-1980—Senior Aquaculture Development Officer, FAO/UNDP South China Sea Fisheries Development and Coordinating Programme (SCS), Manila, Philippines
1981-1985—Free-lance Consultant in Aquaculture performing short-term and medium consultancy to FAO, UNDP, world Bank, Asian Development Bank, USAID and Philippine government agencies and private companies. Based in Quezon City, Metro manila, Philippines
1985-1989—Senior Aquaculture Consultant, International Aquaculture Consultants, Inc., Makati, Metro Manila, Philippines.
1985- 1991—Member, External Evaluation Panel of an internationally conducted aquaculture research, USAID Pond Dynamics Aquaculture
1989-1992—Member, Governing Council of the Philippine Council for Aquatic Marine Research and Development (PCMRD), Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines
1990-1993—President and concurrent Chairman, Aquafarming Development Foundations, Inc., White Plains, Quezon City, Philippines
1985-?—Founding Member and Member, Board of Directors, Society of Aquaculture Engineers of the Philippines, Quezon City, Philippines
1986--?—Member, Board of Editors, Journal of Aquaculture in the Tropics, Oxford & IBH Publishing Co., Calcutta, India
1903-?—Member, Board of Editors, Aquaculture International, Journal of the European Aquaculture Society, Oostende, Belgium
1994-?—Chairman Emeritus and Senior Technical Adviser, Aquafarming Development Foundation, Inc., White Plains, Quezon City, Philippines
Dr. Rabanal has participated in numerous conferences, symposia, meetings and workshops worldwide.
In 1952, he attended the Fourth Indo-Pacific Fisheries Council Conference, Quezon City. He also participated in the 8th Pacific Science Congress (Member, Pondfish Culture Sub-Committee Oceanography Section), Quezon City, 1958.
The following year, he attended the 89th Annual Meeting of the American Fisheries Society, Clearwater, Florida.
Dr. Rabanal also attended the Asia Productivity Conference, Bureau of Fisheries, Manila in 1960 and the Agro-Industrial Conference of the National Science Development Board, Manila.
In 1961, he attended the Pacific Science Congress in Honolulu, Hawaii.
As mentioned above, Dr. Rabanal’s technical, semi-technical and popular papers on aquaculture, fisheries biology and related subjects are enormous.
Here are some of them:

Rabanal, H. R. 1940. A preliminary study of the composition of lab-lab or plant complex raised in bangos fishpond nurseries. B.S. Thesis, University of the Philippines. 48p.
Delmendo, M. N., Rabanal, H.R. 1956. Cultivation of ‘sugpo’ (jumbo tiger shrimp) Penaeus monodon fabricius, in the Philippines. Proc. IPFC 6(3):424-431 (Also in Phil .J. Fish 8(2):159-175 (1973)
Rabanal, H. R. and Hosillos, L. V. 1958. Control of less desirable exotic species of fish competing with or harmful to desirable indigenous species in inland waters in the Philippines. Phil J. Fish. 6(1):49-70.
Rabanal, H. R., Acosta, P.A., Delmendo, M. N. 1960. Limnological survey of Laguna de Bay—a pilot study on aquatic productivity. Phil. J. Fish. 8(1):101-111.
Juliano, R. O. Rabanal, H. R. 1963. The tolerance of milkfish fingerlings and fry, Chanos chanos (Forskal), to decreases in salinity. Copeia (1):180-181.
Yap, W. G. Rabanal, H. R., Llobrera, J. a. 1996. Winning the future in fisheries. Sampaloc, Manila, Philippines: Mary Jo Educational Supply. 132p.
Rabanal, H. R. 1999. The social responsibility of a scientist to transfer technology to end users. (8th Dean D. K. Villaluz Memorial Lecture delivered on the occasion of the 26th anniversary celebration of SEAFDEC-Aquaculture Department, Tigbauan, Iloilo, 8 July 1999.
Because of his expertise in fisheries, Dr. Rabanal became a member of several scientific societies and organizations:
American Association for the Advancement of Science
American Ecological Society
American Society of Limnology and Oceanography
Indian Academy of Zoology
National Geographic Society
National Research Council of the Philippines
Phi Sigma biological honor Society
Philippine Association for the Advancement of Science
Phycological Society of the Philippines
Soil Science Society of the Philippines;

For his distinguished contributions to the development of fisheries in the region, Dr. Rabanal was given various awards which include the following:

1958-1961--John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Science Fellowship Award
September 24, 1965--Certificate of Merit for valuable contribution towards the development and improvement of agriculture and conservation of natural resources, by the Philippine Fisheries Commission, Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Manila, Philippines
January 19, 1987--Honorary Life Membership award to the World Aquaculture Society, WAS 18th Annual Convention, Guayaquil, Ecuador
October 23, 1997--Educator Awardee in Fish for Every Filipino Award sponsored by the Marine Fisheries Technology Foundation, Inc, DA-BFAR and the Fishing Industry in Quezon City, Metro Manila, Philippines
In 1999, Dr. Rabanal donated his collection of books, pamphlets, leaflets, journals, reprints, and papers authored or edited by him to the SEAFDEC-AQD Library for he believes in the saying: "information should not be kept rotting in a cabinet but rather, it should be made accessible and utilized."
That is Dr. Herminio Rabanal, the Filipino fisheries scientist and administrator, who was in the forefront in shaping the development of Philippine fisheries.
Sources:
His Curriculum Vitae, no date. Typewritten. 5 leaves.
The Library. SEAFDEC-AQD. Dr. Herminio R. Rabanal: Chronological List of Publications. Tigbauan, Iloilo: the Library, 199




Dean Domiciano K. Villaluz: Pioneer in the Study of Tiger Prawn in the Philippines
By
Melchor F. Cichon
July 13, 2006

Do you know that one of the earliest Filipinos to study the biology and culture of tiger prawn or sugpo (Penaeus monodon Fabricius) was Dean Domiciano K. Villaluz together with D. V. Villadolid?
As early as 1951 these two Filipino scientists published an article in The Philippine Journal of Fisheries entitled " The cultivation of Sugpo, Penaeus monodon Fabricius in the Philippines". Here they described the morphological structure of sugpo. They also described sugpo’s feeding habits, the migration of sugpo fry, the sugpo fry fishery, and the cultivation of sugpo.
Before that, sugpo were being caught in the wild. At times though, sugpo were harvested in the fishponds but only as a secondary product.
In the 1980s and early 1990s, sugpo was the highest Philippine fisheries export amounting to millions of pesos. But when other countries like Thailand and Indonesia started to produce sugpo and with the onset of luminous bacteria, sugpo’s production started to dive.
Today, sugpo production is at its lowest level.
What could be one of the reasons for the increase of sugpo production in the Philippines in the 1980s?
When SEAFDEC-AQD was being established, the SEAFDEC Council members decided that the focus of this Department would be the production of sugpo, or Penaeus monodon Fabricius.
At that time, Dean Villaluz was experimenting on artificial propagation of this species in Mindanao, where he was the Dean of the College of Fisheries of Mindanao State University in Marawi City.
Before that Dean Villaluz had published a series of articles on sugpo. In 1953, he published a book entitled: Fish farming in the Philippines. In this book, he devoted one chapter on the cultivation of sugpo.
And so the SEAFDEC Council decided to appoint Dean Villaluz as its first Chief of SEAFDEC-AQD in 1973.
He stayed in SEAFDEC-AQD until July 7, 1979.
Here is a report from SEAFDEC-AQD how Dean Villaluz was chosen as its first chief: "When SEAFDEC established the AQD in 1973, the Council decided to make tiger shrimp the main R&D focus and appointed Dean Domiciano K. Villaluz of the Mindanao State University the first AQD chief in recognition of his track record in shrimp research. In 1938, Dean Villaluz and F. J. Arriola published a paper on Penaeus taxonomy in Philippine Journal of Science (vol 66, pp. 35-41). In 1950, at the Second Meeting of the Indo-Pacific fisheries Council in Sydney, D. V. Villadolid and D. K. Villaluz presented the paper " The cultivation of Sugpo Penaeus monodon Fabricius in the Philippines. Dean Villaluz was working on the artificial propagation of tiger shrimp at the MSU-Naawan campus at about the same time that Dr. Liao was doing the same at TML. The paper of Villaluz et al (1969): "reproduction, larval development, and cultivation of sugpo Penaeus monodon Fabricius" appeared in Philippine Journal of Science (vol. 98, pp. 205-233). Thus it was that from the very start, the AQD promoted tiger shrimp hatchery and grow-out through research, training and extension including the conduct of the First (1983) and the Second (1996) International Conferences on Penaeid Prawns/Shrimps. Dean Villaluz bannered the AQD effort on tiger shrimp until his retirement in 1979 (July 7, 1979, when Dr. R. Juliano became the second SEAFDEC-AQD chief.
But who is Dean Villaluz?
This writer has very little information about Dean Villaluz' background.
Dean Villaluz was born in Angono, Rizal on July 30, 1909. He took both his Bachelor of Science in Education, major in zoology (BSE, 1931) and his Master of Science in Zoology (MS, 1937) from the University of the Philippines.
From 1939-1941, Dean Villaluz was a government student in Japan and a scholar of the U.S. State Department in the University of Washington in 1946-1947.
He wanted to become a physician, but for some reasons, he failed to pursue his medical career. Instead he went into fisheries.
He worked as Fishpond Supervisor at the Rehabilitation Finance Corporation. He also worked as a fish culturist at the Bureau of Fisheries.
It was at this time when he conducted researches and wrote both scientific and popular articles in fisheries.
In one of his articles, Dean Villaluz suggested that: " In the Philippines our need for a definite policy relative to the development of a certain fishery should received top consideration. The immediate problem is how to produce more fish to feed our ever increasing population. The point to consider in this connection is: Shall we develop our offshore fisheries or our inland fisheries including the fishponds? Developing offshore fisheries would mean fishing in international waters, following migration of pelagic fishes of commercial importance to their feeding, breeding, and spawning grounds which may happen to be in waters belonging to other countries. In other words, offshore fishing for the Philippines would be mostly international in scope as it is in other countries. Are we ready to engage in this kind of fishing which will require technical know-how and millions of pesos as capital?"
Here are his publications related to Philippine fisheries:
Arriola, F. J. and D. K. Villaluz. 1939. Snail fishing and duck raising in Laguna de bay. Phil. J. Sci 69:173-190
Blanco, G. J., D. K. Villaluz and H. R. Montalban. 1951. The cultivation and biology of oysters of Bacoor Bay, Luzon. Phil. J. Fish 1(1):35-54
Mane, A. M. and D. K. Villaluz. 1939. The pukot fisheries of Laguna de Bay. Phil. J. Sci 69: 394-413.
Rabanal, H. R., H. R. Montalban and D. K. Villaluz. 1951. The preparation and management of the bangos fishpond nursery in the Philippines. Phil. J. Fish 1(1): 3-34
Villadolid, D. K. and D. K. Villaluz. Animals destructive to oysters in Bacoor Bay, Luzon. Phil. J. Sci 67 (1938):393-397
Villadolid, D. K. and D. K. Villaluz.. 1950. A preliminary study on bangos cultivation and its relation to algae culture in the Philippines. Dept. Agri. Nat. Res. Pop. Bull No. 30.
Villadolid, D. K. and D. K. Villaluz.. 1951. The cultivation of Sugpo, Penaeus monodon Fabricius in the Philippines. Phil. J. Fish 1(1):55-66
Villaluz, D. K. 1950. Management of some Philippine fisheries. Bull Fish. Soc. Phil :1: 31-37.
Villaluz, D. K. 1939. Vertical distribution of oyster spats in Bacoor Bay. Phil. J. Sci 70(4):375-385
Villaluz, D. K. 1939. Viability of commercial oyster spats in Bacoor Bay. Phil J. Sci 70(4):375-385
Villaluz, D. K. 1953. Fish farming in the Philippines. Bookman, Manila, 1953. 336p.
Villaluz, D. K. and F. J. Arriola. 1938. Five other known species of the Genus Penaeus in the Philippines. Phil. J. Sci 66:35-41.
Villaluz, D. K. Oyster farming. Phil. Journ. Sci. 65(1938):304-311.
He served as the Philippine Alternate Delegate to the Indo-Pacific Fisheries Council in Cronulla, N.S.W, Australia, April 17-28, 1950, where he presented a paper together with D. V. Villadolid on the cultivation of sugpo in the Philippines.
In 1963, he was appointed dean of the College of Fisheries, Mindanao State University—Marawi, 1963 until 1973 when he was appointed as the first Chief of SEAFDEC-AQD, 1973-1979.
For his distinguished contributions to fisheries, he received some awards.
In October 1976, he received the Rizal Pro Patria Award given by the President of the Philippines. Two years before this, he received the Gregoria y Zara Scientist Award given by the Philippine Association for the Advancement of Science and the National Science Development Board, and the Outstanding Service Award from the Philippine Federation of Fish Farm Producers. In 1977, he received the UP Alumni Award from the UP Alumni Association.
In 1979, he received the Pantas award given by the Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development, DOST "for his pioneering research on prawn culture. The induced prawn spawning and hatchery technology he developed had stabilized prawn fry supply for the country’s fish farmers.
He was recognized for his lifelong mission to prove it the Filipino farmer that any little space of land can be made productive from technology adaptation coupled with strong determination."
To honor and perpetuate his contributions to the development of prawn culture in the Philippines, and for his able leadership while serving as SEAFDEC-AQD Chief during its organizational and formative years (1973-1979), the SEAFDEC-AQD management established the annual Dean Domiciano K. Villaluz Memorial Lecture where Filipino fisheries scientists deliver lectures on various topics in fisheries.
Dean Villaluz died in Angono, Rizal on April 28, 1986 at the age of 76 but his legacy as a pioneer researcher in sugpo culture will live on.
Sources:
Bagarinao, Teodora. Dr. I-Chiu Liao of Taiwan and SEAFDEC/AQD's early history. SEAFDEC Asian Aquaculture, October-December 2002.
SEAFDEC-AQD Annual Report, 1979, p. 35
Villaluz, D. K. 1950. Management of some Philippine Fisheries. Bulletin of the Fisheries Society of the Philippines 1:31-37.
Villaluz, D. K. 1953. Fish farming in the Philippines. Bookman, Manila, 1953. 336p




Claro T. Martin: The Prolific Philippine Fisheries Researcher of His Time
By
Melchor F. Cichon
August 2006

Two years from now, specifically on August 10, 2008, the family, if not the town of Malolos, Bulacan, will celebrate the centennial birthday of Claro Tolentino Martin.
Who is Claro T. Martin?
Martin was born on August 10, 1908 in Malolos, Bulacan to the couple Antonio Martin and Julia Tolentino. But his last known residence was in Bautista St., San Francisco del Monte, Quezon City.
The young Claro grew up to become one of the earliest Filipino molders of fisheries researches in the Philippines. He married twice and was blessed with six children. He married his first wife, Edna Buck, on March 7, 1929; and his second, Juliana Millan, on December 12, 1952. Their children were Rosalinda, Hector, Victor, Rose Marie, Clarence and Anton.
He finished his Bachelor of Science degree at the University of the Philippines in 1927.
After which, he worked as Assistant at the Division of Fisheries, Bureau of Science most probably just after his graduation in 1927. The following year, he was promoted as Asst. Ichthyologist in the same office.
After several years of working from the different offices of the Bureau of Science and from the Bureau of Fisheries, he became the Chief of the Division of Fisheries Technology, 1947-1957. He also served as contributing editor to the Philippine Journal of Fisheries.
He was a member of several societies and organizations like the Philippine Scientific Society; National Research Council of the Philippines; Fisheries Society of the Philippines; Zoological Society of India; The Academy of Zoology, Agra, India; Philippine Association for the Advancement of Science, Phi Sigma fraternity (Alpha Chi chapter, U.P. biological Society).
It was during these periods that Mr. Martin conducted a lot of studies on fisheries and published his findings in various publications more particularly in the Philippine Journal of Science.
His scientific studies on fisheries will show us the extent of his contributions to the early researches on Philippine fisheries. He did not only work on fisheries resources, but he also focused his attention on the possibility of industrializing fisheries in the country. He also wrote on the post-harvest aspect of Philippine fisheries. The concept of coastal resources management was not in his consciousness then, but in his welcome remarks at the Dagat-Dagatan Fishery Experimental Station, Malabon, Rizal on December 8, 1959, he sounded a warning to the legislators "that in the program of industrialization the compensatory bad effect of industrial plants through pollution of the water by the effluents from them should not be overlooked."
So far, this writer has captured 27 published articles and pamphlets, both in popular and in scientific journals like the Philippine Journal of Science.
Here is the complete list.
Martin, Claro and Heraclio R. Montalban. 1934. Philippine Sillaginidae, Philippine Journal of Science 55(3):221-229.
Martin, Claro and Heraclio R. Montalban. 1935. Philippine Parapercidae. Philippine Journal of Science 56(2):215-227.
Adams, Wallace, Heraclio R. Montalban and Claro Martin. 1932. Cultivation of bangos in the Philippines. Philippine Journal of Sciences 47(1): 1-38
Martin, Claro . 1934. Methods of smoking fish around Manila. Philippine Journal of Science 55(1):79-89.Martin, Claro. 1935. The catching of alamang (Palaemonetes sp.) in Bulacan, Bulacan with special reference to the destructive method. National Research Council of the Philippines. Bulletin No. 9, p. 13 (abstract)
Roxas, Hilario A. and Claro Martin. 1937. A checklist of Philippine fishes. Manila, Bureau of Printing. 314p. (Philippine commonwealth). Dept. of Agriculture and Commerce. Technical bulletin 6.
Martin, Claro 1938. Two new Philippine fishes. Philippine Journal of Science 66(3):387-389.
Martin, Claro. 1938. The flying fish industry of the northwestern and southwestern coast of Cebu. Philippine Journal of Science 67(2):177-184.
Martin, Claro.1938. Tuna fisheries and long line fishing in Davao Gulf, Philippines. Philippine Journal of Science 67(2):189-198.
Martin, Claro and H. R. Montalban. 1938. Philippine Parapereidae. Phil. J. Sci 67:189.
Martin, Claro. 1938. The fisheries of the province of Oriental Negros, Cebu, and Bohol. National Research Council of the Philippines. Bulletin no. 19, pp. 121-122 (abstract).
Martin, Claro. 1939. Cultivation of bangos in the Philippines. Philippine Commonwealth. Dept. of Agriculture and Commerce. Popular Bulletin no. 12.
Martin, Claro. 1939. Two rare Philippine fishes. Philippine Journal of Science 66:387-389.
Martin, Claro. 1946. Bangos culture. 8p. (Philippines Republic. Dept. of Agriculture and Commerce. Food Production Series. Leaflet No. 6.
Martin, Claro. 1946. Preparation of fish sauce (patis). 4p. Philippines Republic. Dept. of Agriculture and Commerce. Food Production Series. Leaflet no. 9.
Martin, Claro. 1949. Notes on experimental canning of fish at fish preservation station in Estancia, Iloilo Province. Manila, Bureau of Printing. 15p. (Philippines. Republic. Dept. of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Popular Bulletin no. 28. Also in Fisheries Gazette, May 1960, v. 5, no. 5, p. 2-12.
Martin, Claro and Herbert Warfel. 1951. Outlook for industrialization of Philippine fisheries. Philippine Journal of Fisheries 1(1):99-103; Indo-Pacific Fisheries Council Proceedings, 2nd Meeting, 1950, Sections II and III, p. 153. (abstract)
Villadolid, Deogracias V., Heraclio R. Montalban and Claro Martin. 1948. Role of fresh-water fisheries and fish farms in increased pond production. Farming and Cooperatives (11):12-31.
Martin, Claro. 1952-1953.Commercial miscellaneous aquatic products and their uses. Bulletin of the Fisheries Society of the Philippines 3-4:35-40.
Martin, Claro. 1952-53. Outstanding research on fish and fisheries in the Philippines. Bulletin of the Fisheries Society of the Philippines 3-4:101-109; Philippine fisheries Yearbook, 1953, pp. 66-68,247, 282.
Martin, Claro and Augusto D. Manalo. January 11, 1953. Methods of preservation and processing of fish. Philippine Herald Agricultural Weekly 1(15): 8.
Martin, Claro. March 1954. The fisheries of the Capiz-Masbate sector of the Visayan sea. Agricultural and Industrial Life 16(3);50-51.
Martin, Claro and Jose .I.Sulit. 1955. Studies on the preparation of salted fish paste (bagoong) from dried dilis (Stolephorus indicus). Philippine Journal of Fisheries, 3(1):39-45.; Indo-Pacific Fisheries Council Proceedings, 4th Meeting, 1952, Section II, p. 258 (abstract); Fisheries Gazette, Sept. 1960, vol. 4, no. 9, p. 26-27; Nutrition News, Oct-Dec 1957, vol. 9, no. 4, p. 19-20.
Martin, Claro. 1959. Preliminary results of the marine fishery biological research program. Manila, Agricultural Information Division, Dept. of agriculture and Natural Resources. 15p. (Technical bulletin no. 26)
Martin, Claro and Inocencio Ronquillo. 1960. Marine fisheries biology research. National Research Council of the Philippines Bulletin No 45, pp. 213-214.
Martin, Claro and Priscilla Cases-Borja. 1962. The status of marine fisheries biological research programme. Philippine Fisheries Yearbook, 15th anniversary issue, pp. 36-44.
Martin, Claro, Leticia Brillo, Constancio N. Legaspi, Teodoro G. Megia, Gregorio T. Velasquez and Deogracias V. Villadolid. 1962. Marine research and training in the Philippines. Science Review 3(3):5-11, 20.
Mr. Martin was a well-travelled man. Almost every year, he was sent to local and international meetings/conferences where he presented the Philippine fisheries situations.

Below is the list of meetings/conferences he attended:

1948—Sub-Area Committee Meeting under the auspices of FAO Buitenzorg, Java.
1949—Inaugural Session of the Indo-Pacific Fisheries Council, Singapore
1950—Second session, Indo-Pacific Fisheries Council, Cronulla, N.S.W., Australia
1952--Fourth Session, Indo-Pacific Fisheries Council, Quezon City
1953--Eight Pacific Congress
1954--Pacific Regional Seminar on "Teaching About U.N. and Education for International Understanding, Quezon City
1955--Sixth Session, Indo-Pacific Fisheries Council, Tokyo.
1955—UNESCO-Sponsored Meeting of Representatives of Marine Sciences Institutes of the Indo-Pacific region, Tokyo
1957—Seventh Session, Indo-Pacific Fisheries Council, Bandung, Indonesia
1958—United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea, Geneva (Adviser on Fisheries to the Philippine Delegation)
1959—UNESCO-Sponsored Regional Conference of Specialists on Marine Sciences, Saigon, South Vietnam
1959—Tenth Session of the Conference of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome1961—Ninth Session, Indo-Pacific Fisheries council, Karachi, Pakistan
1962—UNESCO-sponsored Regional Meeting of Representatives of Marine Sciences Institution in East and Southeast Asia, Manila (Chairman of Philippine Delegation)

For his exemplary works, he received two awards: In 1931, he was sent by the Philippine government as a pensionado for a study tour in the United States, and the Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources conferred him a Merit Award on Fishery Technology (no date given).

Hopefully, what Mr. Martin had worked for had given inspirations to our contemporary fisheries scientists.

Sources::

Blanco, G. J. and H. R. Montalban. 1951. A bibliography of Philippine fishes and fisheries. Philippine Journal of Fisheries 1(2):115-138 (Republished edition, 1977)
His Curriculum Vitae. No date. Typescript.



Silvestre V. Bersamin:
Philippine Pioneer Fisheries Technologist

by

Melchor F. Cichon
July 16, 2007

One of the earliest Filipino fisheries technologists was Dr. Silvestre V. Bersamin.
Born in Bangued, Abra on December 31, 1919, Dr. Bersamin became the Chief of Fishery Technologist and Chief of the Fisheries Utilization Division, Philippine Fisheries Commission on February 25, 1964.
Dr. Bersamin finished B.S. Fisheries at the University of the Philippines in 1942. He then took his M.S. in Zoology at the University of Sto. Tomas in 1954. In 1964, he received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.
His parents were Luis Bersamin and Teodora Valera. His wife was Maria Belisario whom he married in April, 1944. They had six children: Daisy Jean, Cherie Edna, Venice Rowan, Jerome Ralph, Ruby Pearl, and Scarlet Rose.
Dr. Bersamin held several positions before he became the Chief of Fishery Technology Division of the Philippine Fisheries Commission. He was a medical technologist and Chief Clerk of the Medical and Surgical Staff, Base Hospital, U.S. Armed Forces in the Pacific in 1945. The next year he became the Registrar-Instructor of the Philippine Police Detective Academy.
But he was not destined to become military personnel.
In 1946, he became an instructor in Zoology and Botany at the University of Manila.
But he again switched to his first love—fisheries—in 1949 when he was hired as Junior Fish Culturist and Fishery Biologist.
From there he rose to become the Chief of Fisheries Utilization Division of the Philippine Fisheries Commission on February 25, 1964.
Dr. Bersamin received several awards. Some of which are as follows:
He was a fisheries fellow at the U.S. Department of the Interior from 1948 to 1949. From 1955 to 1957, he was a Foreign Student Fellow at the University of Michigan and in 1964, UNESCO awarded him a Fellowship on Marine Sciences.
From there, this writer has no more information about him except that he was a professor and chairman of the Biological Science Department, Graduate School and member of the Dean’s Council of the University of Sto. Tomas in 1965
What he has is a list of Dr. Bersamin’s publications.
From 1949 to 1965, Dr. Bersamin wrote 29 articles on fisheries particularly on fisheries technologies.
Four of his notable contributions on Philippine fisheries are the following:
Determination of the Vitamin D potency of certain fishery products by the biological method. Sea Echo, December 1949.
Availability of calcium in bagoong alamang, dried alamang, canned bangos, oyster shell and balut. Silvestre V. Bersamin, Olympia N. Gonzales and Jose Sulit. Philippine Journal of Fisheries, July-December 1955, vol. 3, no. 2, pp. 85-95
The effect of kalamansi juice on the preservation and keeping quality of fresh shrimps. Silvestre V. Bersamin, A. S. Legaspi and N. G. Macalinlag. Indo-Pacific Fisheries Council Proceedings, 10th session, Seoul, Korea, 1962, Section II.
Fish hydrolyzates from commercial Philippine species, Part I. Preliminary studies on hydrolized fish protein. L. G. Salcedo, G. Guevara and Silvestre V. Bersamin. Indo-Pacific Fisheries Council Proceedings, 11 session, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Oct 16-31, IPFC/C64/Tech. 23.

Source: His bio-data. 6 leaves. Type-written. No date.




Santos B. Rasalan: Early Leader In Philippine Fisheries

One of the early leaders and fisheries scientists in the Philippines was Santos B. Rasalan.
Born in Sarrat, Ilocos Norte, on October 29, 1905, the young Santos finished the degree of Bachelor of Science in Zoology at the University of the Philippines in 1903. He has five children with the former Calixta Balicanta also of Sarrat.
In 1934, he worked as a student assistant in the Fish and Game Administration of the Department of Agriculture and Commerce in 1934. It was through this assistantship that his interest on fisheries developed. He worked  as Ichthyologist, Assistant Fish Culturist, Fishing Gear Specialist, Fishery Technologist, and Chief of the Marine Fisheries Division. The highest position he handled was Deputy Commissioner of the Fisheries and Officer-in-Charge when Pres. Ferdinand E. Marcos appointed him to that position in March 1966. On July 5, 1967, the Commission on Appointment confirmed his appointment as Deputy Commissioner for fisheries services, information and regulation.
Mr. Rasalan served as official Philippine delegate to various meetings abroad.
According to Nellie M. Anorico, Mr.  Rasalan was the lone Philippine delegate to the 2nd FAO Technical Conference on Fishery Research Craft held at Seattle, Washington last May 1968.  He was also the lone Philippine government delegate to the 10th session of the Indo-Pacific Fisheries Council held at Seoul, Korea in 1962. He again attended the 12th session of the IPFC held at Honolulu, Hawaii from October 2-17, 1966.
During his term as Deputy Commissioner, he proposed, and was approved by the Secretary of Agriculture and Natural Resources,  Fernando Lopez,  the amendment of Section 2 of the Fisheries Administrative Orders (FAO) no. 84.
Section two of the approved FAO says:   "Section 2. Prohibition. - It shall be unlawful for any person to engage in electro-fishing or to catch fish by the use of electric current in freshwater fisheries in the Philippines such as rivers, lakes, swamps, dams, irrigation canals and other bodies of freshwater except for research, educational and scientific purposes which must be covered by a permit issued by the Secretary of Agriculture and Natural Resources which shall be carried at all times."
As a scientist, Mr. Rasalan contributed the following:

Rasalan, S. B. Si-si fishery of Samar, Philippine Islands. Phil J. Sci. 64 (1937).
Rasalan, S. B. Methods of preserving fishing appliances in Samar province. Phil. J. Sci. 73 (1940)
Rasalan, S. B. New methods of fish capture in the Philippines. Bull. Fish. Soc. Phil. 1(1950):57-66.
Rasalan, S. B. and D. V. Villadolid. The basnig, a bag net for pelagic fishing in the Philippines. Dept. of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Manila, Philippines. Tech. Bull. 21. In press.(as of 1951)
Rasalan, SB. 1953. Fish corral fishing in the Philippines. bull. Fish. Soc. Philipp. 3&4:45-63.
Rasalan, SB. 1950. New methods of fish capture in the Philippines. bull. Fish. Soc. Philipp. 1:57-68.
Rasalan, SB. 1952. Fishing gear commonly used in Philippine fishing. Philippine Fisheries, a handbook prepared by the Technical Staff of the Bureau of Fisheries, pp. 53-69.
Rasalan, SB and B. Y. Datingaling. 1952-1953. Bull. fish. Soc. Philipp 3/4:64-72.




Jose S. Domantay:
An Internationally Acclaimed Natural Scientist
By
Melchor F. Cichon
Otolith, April-June 1997, p. 11

Mr. Jose Sison Domantay was considered by his contemporaries as the only living Filipino and among the very few living ochinodormists of the world. His article which he co-authored with P. B. Sivickis, “The morphology of a holothurian, Stichopus chloronotus Brandt” , published in Philippine Journal of Science, 37(1928):299-332, was the first written article exclusively on Philippine holothurians or trepang. He followed this with 10 articles on holothurians published mostly in the Philippine Journal of Science and the U.P. Natural and Applied Science Bulletin between 1931-1961. Three of these are, “Autotomy in holothurian,” (1931); “Littoral holothurioidea of Port Galera Bay and adjacent waters, “ (1933); and “Four additional species of littoral holothurioidea of Puerto Galera Bay and adjacent waters”, (1934).
His deep interest on Philippine echinoderms was inspired by the works done by Captain Ziesenhenne of the Allan Hancock Foundation on the many echinoderms caught during the survey of Manila Bay after World War II. Ziesenhenne classified those echinoderms but the result was not published.
Domantay was born on November 5, 1897 in Malasiqui, Pangasinan. He finished his elementary education in his hometown while he had his secondary schooling at the then National Academy High School (NAHS), now the National University, Manila in 1917.
From NAHS, he proceeded to the University of the Philippines (UP) where he obtained four undergraduate degrees: Associate in Arts (AA, 1921); Bachelor of Philosophy (PhB, 1923); Bachelor of Science (BS in Zoology, 1925); and Master of Science (MS zoology, 1928). After the war, he enrolled at the Graduate School of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA, as a Fulbright Scholar for his Doctor of Philosophy degree. Unfortunately, he was not able to finish the degree because his superior at the Bureau of Fisheries did not approve the extension of his official stay at the U.S.A.
From 1935 to 1940, Domantay along with other Filipino fisheries scientists like D. Villadolid, G. Blanco, A. Umali and others, was trained by Dr. Albert Herre on marine resources of Philippine seas. It was during this period that a worldwide economic depression took place. This resulted to the drastic cut of the bureau and the salaries of the staff reduced. Despite this situation, Domantay stayed with the bureau. For this reason, he was called by Jose Velasco and Luz Baens-Arcega as one of the Preservers of the Bureau of Science.
At 21, he worked as a senior clerk at the Municipal Treasurer’s Office in Malasiqui, Pangasinan while pursuing his college degree at U.P. In 1923, just after he obtained his PhB degree, he was appointed as Assistant Instructor in zoology at the U.P. College of Liberal Arts. Three years after that, he was promoted as instructor. During this time, he was simultaneously teaching zoology classes at UP and at the Ateneo de Manila University. In June 1937, he accepted the position of a Fisheries Technologists at the Division of Fisheries of the Bureau of Science. After 25 years (May 5, 1961), he was appointed as assistant director of the Bureau of Fisheries. But in 1954, while working at the Bureau of Science, he was granted permission by the Secretary of Agriculture and Natural Resources to teach at the Graduate School, University of Santo Tomas (UST). Since then, he had been connected with UST as a Professional Lecturer.
Like other Filipino scientists who worked in the Philippine government office, Domantay was privileged to conduct researches on Philippine fisheries. Some of his other studies other than that on trepang were on turtle fisheries at the Turtle Islands; marine vegetation and the fauna of the Hundred Islands in Lingayen Gulf; and on the taxonomy of the holothurioides collection of the Allan Hancock foundation, University of Southern California.
Before he retired on November 5, 1962, he had published more than 60 papers on various aspects of Philippine fishes and fisheries.
It was also during this time that Domantay was able to collect valuable rare specimens of Philippine fishes and fisheries. It was said that these specimens were left at the Philippine Institute of Fisheries Technology (PIFT), the forerunner of the UPV College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences. He was once a faculty member of PIFT when the institute was still under the Bureau of Fisheries. He also had another set of biological collection in Zamboanga City where he was once assigned. However, all these valuable specimens were lost during the war. But he continued his mission of collecting Philippine biological specimens after the war. Upon retirement, he donated the gathered specimens to the Bureau of Fisheries.
Due to his accomplishments as a scholar and as a scientist, he became a member of honor societies and scientific organizations like Sigma XI, Phi Sigma, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the National Research Council of the Philippines, and the Philippine Association for the Advancement of Science.
After his retirement from government service, Domantay continued to teach at the Graduate School, UST, Manila. He was, in fact, the thesis adviser of the former dean of the UPV College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences—Prof. Prudencia V.Conlu when she took her MA degree in Zoology at UST.
Prof. Conlu rose to become one of the most prominent Philippine ichthyologists of her time.
Bibliography
Anon. 1962. (Nov-Dec). “Assistant director Domantay Retires.” Fisheries Gazette, p. 1
Blanco, Guillermo J. and A. R. Montalban. 1051. “Bibliography of Philippine Fishes and Fisheries.” Philippine Journal of Fisheries 1(2):115-138.
Francisco, Isidro M. (Nov-Dec), “A Man of Science Retires”. Fisheries Gazette, pp. 56-57, 64.
Velasco, Jose R. and Luz Baens-Arcega. 1984. National Institute of Science and Technology 1901-1982: A Facet of Science development in the Philippines. Manila: NIST. 196p.



Dr. Deogracias V. Villadolid: Father of Fisheries Education in the Philippines
By
Melchor F. Cichon
Otolith, January-March 1996, p. 13
Many UPV constituents were surprised when former Chancellor Francisco Nemenzo approved the naming of the present Administration Building of the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of the Philippines in the Visayas, in Miag-ao, Iloilo to DR. DEOGRACIAS V. VILLADOLID HALL. They were surprised because it was the first time that they ever heard about this man.
Who is Dr. Deogracias V. Villadolid? Why honor him?
Villadolid is not known among non-fisheries graduates. However, those who have been trained in fisheries know him especially in relation to the early beginnings of fishery science and fisheries education in the Philippines.
It was Villadolid who introduced tilapia in the Philippines in 1950 when he was Director of the Bureau of Fisheries. He also initiated fisheries education in the country. For this reason, he is known as the Father of Fisheries Education in the Philippines.
From his humble beginnings in Nasugbu, Batangas, Villadolid rose to become the most respected Filipino fisheries scientists in his time. In fact, he is also known as the Dean of Philippine fisheries. He studied agriculture at the U.P. College of Agriculture (UPCA), now the College of Agriculture, University of the Philippines at Los Baños, Laguna. He earned three degrees from UPCA: Bachelor of Agriculture in 1919, Bachelor of Science in Agriculture in 1923, and Master of Science in Agriculture in 1923.
From UPCA, he proceeded to Stanford University in Palo Alto, California in the United States of America where he obtained a Doctor of Philosophy degree, major in marine biology and minor in aquatic botany in 1927.
Upon his return to the Philippines, he taught at the UPCA. It was there where he designed a course of instruction on limnology, biology of aquatic fauna and flora, particularly fishes, phycology and a general fisheries program. This course was incorporated in the College of Agriculture program. It was also at this time when Villadolid trained UPCA students on the mechanics of fishery science.
From UPCA, he transferred to the newly organized Fish and Game Administration of the Department of Agriculture where he worked with the world famous ichthyologist, Dr. Albert Herre. (the latter was the man who discovered the smallest fish in the world, Pandaca pygmea, which was then found at the Dagat-Dagatan lagoon in Malabon, Metro Manila. Thanks to the development projects of our government and to the pollution contributed by our people so that the lagoon and this Philippine pride are now gone. But you can still see the preserved form of this very rare species at the UPV Museum of Natural Science in Miag-ao, Iloilo)
Villadolid then served as Director of the Bureau of Fisheries and continued to do so even during the Japanese occupation. After the war, he spearheaded the establishment of the first fisheries school in the Philippines, the Philippine Institute of Fisheries Technology (PIFT) in 1946. The school, then located in Navotas, Port Area, Manila, attracted students not only from the Philippines but also from Thailand, Burma, Indonesia, Vietnam, India and Pakistan. The said Institute was transferred from the Bureau of Fisheries, Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources in January 1957 to the University of the Philippines through Republic Act 997 or the Reorganization Act. This law was approved by the Philippine President Ramon Magsaysay. (It was in this school where Dr. Rogelio O. Juliano, the former Chancellor of the UPV received his Certificate in Fisheries in 1952). This school stayed in Port area, Manila until 1962. On April 10, 1958, the PIFT was reorganized by the UP Board of Regents and became the UP College of Fisheries. This pioneering school became the forerunner of more than 50 fisheries schools in the country today.
It was during his stint in the Bureau of Fisheries where Villadolid produced about 150 articles on fisheries research, most of which are pioneering researches on Philippine fisheries. In fact, the proceedings of the D.V. Villadolid symposium held on March 22, 1966 and sponsored by the National Research Council of the Philippines, the Philippines Fisheries Commission and the U.P. College of Fisheries, listed 146 works authored by Villadolid which also included those done in collaboration with other Filipino fisheries scientists.
During his term as Director of the Bureau of Fisheries, he succeeded in sending 125 Filipino fisheries pensionadores to the United States of America to train on deep-sea fishing. He also contributed to fisheries development in the country by declaring a Fish Conservation week which until today is being observed every October throughout the country.
Villadolid was a well-traveled person. He had gone to several countries like Washington, D.C. in the U.S.A., Japan and Denmark as a Philippine delegate to many international conferences and meetings or a vice-chairman and later as chairman of the Indo-Pacific Fisheries Council (IPFC). He was also a member of several professional and honor societies like Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma XI, and the National Research Council of the Philippines.
For his distinguished achievements and services for the development of fisheries in the Philippines and in the region, Villadolid received awards from local and international organizations. Two of these awards were the Distinguished Science Star medal and Diploma of Honor as a Philippine Presidential Awardee in Science in 1954. He also received the Dr. Shinkishi Hatai Medal in Tokyo, Japan when he was a special Guest of the 11th Pacific Science Congress in Tokyo, Japan. This award is bestowed to scientists with the most remarkable contributions to marine biology in the Pacific area. Villadolid was the first Filipino to receive such an honor.
He retired from government service on March 22, 1961 on his 65th birthday. During his retirement, he served as the Vice-President of Araneta University and as Dean of the Institute of Graduate Studies and Applied Research in the same university until his 70th birthday in 1966.
Indeed, Dr. Deogracias Villamin Villadolid served as a guiding star to numerous Filipino fisheries scientists for many years and even long after he died at the age of 80 in 1976.
Dr. Juan Salcedo, Jr., then Chairman of the National Research Council of the Philippines, describes the Father of Philippine Fisheries Education as: “One of the country’s outstanding biologists, Dr. Deogracias V. Villadolid devoted the last years of his life to the advancement of research in fisheries in the Philippines and in the Indo-Pacific area. He contributed a great deal to the sustained study and interest in the biology of fishes, especially cultivation and conservation as well as to the promotion of the fishery industry.”



Nazario A. Pidlaoan: Pioneer Director of UP College of Fisheries
By Melchor F. Cichon
Otolith, July-September 1997, p. 11
Revised: March 4, 2008
The first director of the U.P. College of Fisheries, now the UP Visayas College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, was Prof. Nazario A. Pidlaoan, a fishery technologist, chemist and a dedicated fishery professor.
According to Dr. Rogelio O. Juliano, the first dean of U.P. College of Fisheries was Dr. Jose V. Yapchiongco. Prof. Pidlaoan succeeded Dr. Yapchiongco when the latter retired in 1970.
From his curriculum vitae, I learned that this gentleman had done a lot in the development of fisheries education in the Philippines particularly that of the UP College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences.
Pidlaoan was born in San Carlos, Pangasinan on April 5, 1905. He finished his Bachelor of Agriculture and a Bachelor of Sciences in Agriculture degrees in the UP College of Agriculture in 1929 and 1933, respectively. Immediately after graduation, Pidlaoan worked as an instructor and researcher at his alma mater from 1929 to 1933. After World War II, the Division of Soil Survey, Department of Agriculture and Commerce hired him as soil biologist. He stayed there from 1946 to August 1947 when he transferred to the Philippine Institute of Fisheries Technology (PIFT), Bureau of Fisheries, Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources as Chief Chemist. At that time, PIFT was located at Port Area, Manila.
He must have been an outstanding administrator because the following year, 1948, he was appointed as Superintendent of PIFT. He held this position until 1957 when the PIFT was transferred to the University of the Philippines in January 1957 by virtue of the Reorganization Act of 1957 (RA 997).
On April 10, 1958, the UP board of Regents reorganized PIFT and it became the UP College of Fisheries, now the UPV College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences. But the new UP academic granting unit remained in Port Area, Manila until 1962. Again because of his excellent performance as head of PIFT, Pidlaoan was appointed by the Board of regents as first Director of the College of Fisheries effective April 11, 1958 to June 30, 1965. Since the College was expanding, the position of the head of the College was changed from director to dean in 1966. Pidlaoan was appointed dean from July 11, 1969 to April 11, 1970. This made him the first dean of the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences.
It was during his term as dean when the College started offering major courses in the Bachelor of Science in Fisheries. The existing Certificate in Fisheries curriculum programs were slowly being phased out. Also, it was during his term that the College acquired from Japan the M/V Pampano, a research and training vessel thru the Philippine reparation Commissions. The turnover of the vessel to the College was on February 9, 1962.
In 1962, the College was transferred from Port area, Manila to its new building at Albert Hall, Diliman, Quezon City. The building was named after the acting UP President and Chairman of the UP Board of Regents, Alejandro Albert. The College stayed there until May 1988 when it moved to its larger and scenic campus at the UP Visayas, Miag-ao, Iloilo.
It was also during Pidlaoan’s term that the Institute of Fisheries Development and Research (IFDR) was established thru Republic Act 4514 which was signed into law by pres. Diosdado Macapagal on June 19, 1965. IFDR served as the research and extension arm of the College.
As a researcher, Pidlaoan focused on nutrition and fisheries education. Some of his works include “Nutritive Value of Fishes”, 1952; “Fisheries Education in the Philippines”, 1962; “quality Assessment of Fish and Fishery Products,” 1965.
Pidlaoan’s thesis at the College of Fisheries, University of Washington, U.S.A. is entitled “The Vitamin A Potency of the Liver Oil and Oil Yield in the Ratfish of Puget Sound and the Relationship of these Factors to Sex of the Fish.”
He also did a study on the artificial propagation of milkfish (Chanos chanos) in 1963-1964. The National Science and Development Board and the College of Fisheries funded it.
Other than being a member of various learned organizations and honor societies, Pidlaoan also attended several international scientific conferences.
It cannot be denied that Pidlaoan played a critical role in moulding the present and future structures of the UPV College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences. Thus, though he no longer lives, his legacy remains. His achievements as a leader will continue to inspire the present and future leadership of the College.
Source: Juliano, R. O. 1998. Inland fisheries in the Philippines: its development, management and future. In: Guerrero, R. D. III. ed. 100 Years of Philippine Fisheries and Marine Science. Los Baños, Laguna. Department of Science and Technology. Philippine Council for Aquaculture and Marine research and Development, pp. 116-192.





Prof. Zosima Vicencio: A Picture of a Dedicated Mentor
by
Soledad S. Garibay

I have known her personally for many years ever since I was a student.
Way back at U.P. Diliman she is a terror Professor because of her 75 % passing score in her Phycology laboratory class.
Yet in many ways Ma’am Vicencio remains a very gentle and sweet mentor.
Born on December 26, 1923 in Navotas, Rizal, Professor Zosima T. Vicencio, “Ziming” to her friends is one of the former Professors of the College of Fisheries who had worked hard with dedication and commitment to her Institution for 39 years. Ms. Vicencio, an M.S. Botany graduate at UP Diliman, is considered as one of the few phycologists in the country sought after her expertise on algal taxonomy not only within the University but by other agencies including private sectors.
Her research was generally on the plankton particularly on diatoms. Among the number of researches she got involved with include the: “Algal Food Habits of the Milkfish”, “Plankton of Samar Sea”, “Plankton Flora of Laguna de Bay”, and “The “Limnological Studies of Bulusan, Naujan and Paoay Lakes”.
No wonder that through her initiative and efforts she has earned a respected status in her own field of specialization.
Ms. Vicencio started her professional career as an Instructor in the Fish Preservation Department of the defunct Philippine Institute of Fisheries Technology (PIFT) which was then under the Bureau of Fisheries. In 1952, she was transferred to the Fish Culture Department where she was made to teach Aquatic Botany (Phycology). In 1957, by organization Law, PIFT was transferred under the administration of the University of the Philippines.
With hard work and determination, she rose in rank from Instructor to Full Professor. At 82, Prof. Vicencio remained active in her career.
For three years, she served as a private consultant working on the identification of planktons both with PHIL-KOEI International Inc., a private agency.
At her age, many envied her because she could  still ably use the microscope and identify phytoplankton. This only shows that her love and dedication to her field of interest never dies.
When asked for her principles in life, she said that, “In the performance of your assigned task, always work systematically to get things done the best way that you can. Be dedicated and devoted to what you do and be determined to strive for accomplishment. Learn and grow along with your chosen field”.
So, what else can I say about her? It is just right that we and the future generations learn from her to become more dedicated and committed in our own chosen field.
Prof. Vicencio who retired in May 1988, has donated some of her seaweed collections at the UPV Museum of Natural Sciences.
She passed away on November 15, 2006 in Malabon, Metro Manila.



Margarita Manibay de la Torre-de la Cruz:
An Expert on Community Based-Coastal Resource Management
by
Melchor F. Cichon
April 20, 2009

Prof. Margarita  de la Torre-de la Cruz was born on September 19, 1953  in Bobon, Northern, Samar. Her parents are Pedro de la Torre and Monserrat Manibay.  She finished her Bachelor of Science in Fisheries  major in Fish Processing Technology degree in October 1973 at the UP College of Fisheries, Diliman, Quezon City.  After teaching at the Bobon School of Fisheries  for two years, she transferred to the Development Academy of the Philippines as a project assistant for four years.  She then joined the faculty of the UPV College Tacloban wherein she got a local fellowship from the U.P. System. She took a Master of Science in Fisheries Biology degree and graduated in May 1986.  Her thesis is entitled: Catch composition and seasonal abundance of fish corral caught fishes in Guiuan, Eastern Samar with notes on the biology of some commercially important species.

This study became her turning point in her scientific studies.

Here are some of her researches and published articles:

De la Cruz, Margarita de la Torre. 1986. Catch composition and seasonal abundance of fish corral caught fishes in Guiuan, Eastern Samar with notes on the biology of some commercially important species. May 1986. 157 leaves. Thesis (M.S. in Fisheries)—U.P. in the Visayas, Miag-ao, Iloilo.
De la Cruz, Margarita de la Torre, K. Muroga. 1989. The effects of Vibrio anguillarum extracellular products  on Japanese eels. Aquaculture 80:201-210.
De la Cruz, Margarita de la Torre, G Erazo, MN Bautista. 1989. Effect of storage temperature on the quality of diets for the prawn, Penaeus monodon Fabricius. Aquaculture 80:87-95
De la Cruz, M. T. 1994. Preliminary observation on the spawning grounds and embryonic development of cuttlefish, Sepia latimus, in Leyte Gulf. UP Tacloban College, Tacloban City. Terminal Report.
De la Cruz, M. T. and Sape, R. M. 1998. Preliminary assessment of the water quality of Bao River, Leyte. UP Tacloban College, Tacloban City. Terminal Report.
De la Cruz, Margarita de la Torre. 2007. Growth performance and survival of abalones Haliotis asinina Linnaeus reared in different salinities. UPV J Nat Sci 12(1):129-133.
Prof.  De la Cruz teaches at the UP Tacloban College, Tacloban City. She is married to Engr. Wilfredo de la Cruz, with whom she has two sons.
Source: UPV Directory of Expertise; A Guide to University Human Resources, University of the Philippines in the Visayas. Miag-ao, Iloilo: Office of Research Coordination, UPV, 1996.





Dr. Lourdes A. Dureza: A Fish Diseases Expert
By
Melchor F. Cichon
April 20, 2009

Dr. Lourdes A. Dureza is one of the very few Filipino experts on fish diseases. She was born on December 23, 1943.
Several years after taking her master’s degree at the U.P. in the Visayas College of Fisheries (now, UPV-College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences (CFOS), she went to  Auburn University to take up a Ph.D. degree. Her dissertation is entitled: Toxicity and lesions in the gills of Tilapia nilotica fry and fingerlings expose to formalin furanace, postassium permanganate and malachite. After her Ph. D., she went back to teaching at the UPV-CFOS. After her retirement, she went back to the United States of America.
While in the Philippines, she  conducted researches on fisheries.

Here are some of her works:

Leano, E. M., Lio-Po, G. D. and Dureza, L.A. 1996. Virulence and production of Extracellular proteins (ECP) of Aeromonas hydrophila associated with the Epizootic Syndrome (EUS) of freshwater fish. UPV Journal of Natural Sciences 1(1):30-38.
Dureza, L. A., Gempis, C., Salvador, R. Sombrero, R. and Belmonte, D. 1994. Effect of selected factors on growth and survival of tilapia hybrids raised in cages in saline water. Second National Tilapia Symposium. PCAMRD Book Series.
Leano, E., Lio-Po, G., Albright L. and Dureza, L. A. 1994. Siderophore detection among bacteria associated with Epizootic Ulcerative Syndrome (EUS). In: Symposium on Diseases in Asian Aquaculture held at Phuket, Thailand.
Dureza, L. A., ed. 1994. Tilapia farming: genetic improvement and advances on culture technology. Los Baños,  Laguna, PCAMRD Book Series 18.
Dureza, L. A. 1992. Toxicity of formalin and potassium permanganate to Oreochromis niloticus fingerlings, In: R. Hirano an I. Hanyu, eds. The Second Asian Fisheries Forum. Asian Fisheries Society, Manila, Philippines, pp. 295-298.
Dureza, L. A. 1980. The effects of various salinity and methyltestosterone levels on the growth, survival and sex reversal of Tilapia mossambica (Peters). 55p. Thesis (M.S. in Fisheries)—College of Fisheries, UPV.
Dr. Lourdes A. Dureza is married to Prof. Virgilio Dureza, a retired professor of  UPV-CFOS.

Source: UPV Directory of Expertise; a Guide to University Human Resources, University of the Philippines in the Visayas. Miag-ao, Iloilo, Office of Research Coordination, UPV.



Dr. Carmen Camacho Velasquez: Distinguished Fish Parasitologist
by

Melchor F. Cichon


One of a few Filipino experts on fish parasitology  is Dr. Carmen Camacho Velasquez. A former professor at the University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City, she published a pioneering book titled Digenetic Trematodes of Philippine Fishes (1975). This book provides a comprehensive summary of the classification, structure, life histories and distribution of known digenetic trematodes of Philippine fishes. 

Here is an excerpt of an article about her in the nast.dost website: “Dr. Velasquez's contributions to science include thirty-two new species and one new genus of digenetic trematodes from Philippine food fishes, two from birds and five from mammals; nine life cycles of trematodes of the family Transversotrematidae, Echinostromatidae, Notocotylidae (2), Plagiorchidae, Heterophyidae (2), Microphallidae and Philophtalmidae. In addition, two new species of nematodes from Philippine fishes and a new species of Capillaria from the intestine of man. Also, a new species of parasitic copepod in Glossogobius giurus (Goby). Most of these works are published in international journals and cited in a number of journals abroad.”
Dr. Velasquez holds the following degrees: BS (Zoology), University of the Philippines, 1934;  MS (Zoology), University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1937 ; Ph. D. (Parasitology) University of the Philippines, 1954.
She received, among others, the following awards and honors:

1. Guggenheim fellowship (1957 and 1963)
2. The Presidential Distinguished Service Medal and Diploma of Honor (1965)
3. The Professional Chair in Zoology, University of the Philippines, 1973-1977.
4. The Special Award of the Biology Teachers Association of the Philippines, Inc. (1975)
5. Outstanding Woman in Science in the Philippines (1975)
6. National Scientist, 1983.

Dr. Velasquez is listed in the following prestigious directories:

American Men and Women of Science
International Scholars' Directory
International Who's Who of Intellectuals
World Whos' Who of Women

Dr. Carmen C. Velasquez was born in 1913 and died in 1994.

Sources:
Anon. Apr-Sept 1989. In Memoriam. The Carillon Newsletter, p. 8.
Anon. Carmen C. Velasquez. http://www.nast.dost.gov.ph/pro_velasquez_c.htm. Retrieved: April 16, 2009



Dr. Arsenio S. Camacho: A Fish Nutrition Expert
by

Melchor F. Cichon

Dr. Arsemio S. Camacho was a professor at the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of the Philippines Visayas before he became its Chancellor from November 1, 1993 to August 16, 1998. He took his Ph. D. degree (Fisheries Management) at Auburn University, U.S.A.
Dr. Camacho was born on January 23, 1945.
Aside from staying in America for his Ph. D. degree, Dr. Camacho had some overseas experiences. In 1977, he went to Thailand, Taiwan, Japan, Malaysia, Indonesia, and Singapore for a study tour of Southeast Asian educational institutions and aquaculture nutrition laboratories. He also went to France in 1980 on a study tour of aquaculture institutions in that country.
Before he migrated to the United States of America, Dr. Camacho  published several articles on fisheries more particularly on fish nutrition.
Here are some of them:

Camacho, AS. 1976. Mono and polyculture of bangus and all-male Tilapia mosambica in brackishwater ponds (Trial II). Inland Fisheries Project Technical Report no. 8, UP College of Fisheries, Diliman, Quezon City, pp. 16-26.
Camacho, AS. 1977. Implication of acid sulfate soils in tropical fish culture. In: Proceedings Joint South China Sea Fisheries Program and SEAFDEC Workshop on Aquaculture Engineering SCSP/GEN/7715, vol II, Manila, Philippines, pp. 97-102.
Camacho, AS. 1979. Nutrition in milkfish. In: Technical Consultation on Available Aquaculture Technology in the Philippines. SEAFDEC Aquaculture Dept. Tigbauan, Iloilo, pp. 43-47.
Camacho, AS. and Dureza, L.A. 1977. Feeding trial using treated and untreated ipil-ipil leaf meal in pelleted feed for tilapia. In: Inland Fisheries technical report nos. 11-12, U.P. College of Fisheries, Brackishwater Aquaculture Center, Leganes, Iloilo, pp. 87-89.
Camacho, AS. and Corre, VL, Jr. 1987. The status of the Philippine shrimp farming industry. In: Report of the Workshop on the conversion of Mangrove Areas to Aquaculture held in Iloilo City, Philippines, April 24-26, 1986. UNDP/UNESCO research and training Pilot Programme on Mangrove Ecosystem in Asia and Pacific (RAS/79/002), New Delhi, 1987, pp. 128-145.
Camacho, AS. Corre, VL, Jr., Bien, N. 1982. Development of artificial feeds for milkfish fry for an extensive milkfish fingerling production. I. Optimum requirement of protein, carbohydrates, vitamins and fats. In: Technical Report. Brackishwater Aquaculture Center, College of Fisheries, U.P. in the Visayas, Iloilo, Philippines.
Camacho, AS, Corre, VL, Jr., Tubongbanua, ES. 1982. Use of agricultural by-products and waste substitutes. Iloilo. Technical Report. Brackishwater Aquaculture Center, College of Fisheries, U.P. in the Visayas, Iloilo, Philippines.
Camacho, AS, Dureza, L., Gempis,C. 1977. the effects of varying salinity and hormone levels on growth, survival and sex reversal of the cichlid fry Tilapia mossambica. In: Inland Fisheries Technical Report nos. 11-12. U.P. College of Fisheries. brackishwater Aquaculture Center, Leganes, Iloilo,pp. 114-126.
Camacho, AS, Corre, VL, Jr., Bien, NB, Palao, JM. 1982. The development of artificial feeds for milkfish fry for an intensive milkfish fingerling production: optimum requirement of protein, carbohydrates, vitamins and fats. In: Technical Report, 1978-1980. Brackishwater Aquaculture Center, College of Fisheries, U.P. in the Visayas, Leganes, Iloilo, pp. 1.2-1.34.
Camacho, AS and Bagarinao, T. 1986. Impact of fish pond management on the mangrove ecosystem. In: Mangroves of Asia and the Pacific: Status and Management; Technical Report of Asia of the UNDP/UNESCO research and Pilot Program on Mangrove Ecosystem in Asia and the Pacific. Quezon City, Philippines: Ministry of Natural Resources Management Center and national Mangrove Committee, pp. 383-406.
Camacho, AS. 1975. Status and needs of fish nutrition. In: PCAR Fisheries Research Congress, Ist, Legaspi City, 1975. Proceedings. Makati: SEAFDEC, PP. 97-105.
Camacho, AS. Fineman-Kaliao, A. 1987. the effects of supplemental feeds containing different protein energy ratios on the growth and survival of Oreochromis niloticus (L) in brackishwater ponds. Aquaculture and Fisheries Management 18:139-149.

When Dr. Camacho left the Philippines, the Filipinos lost an expert on fish nutrition, aquaculture, and invertebrate zoology.





Dr. Carlos C. Baylon: An Aquaculturist
by
Melchor F. Cichon
April 15, 2009


On January 20, 1953, the would-be  Dean of the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of the Philippines Visayas (CFOS-UPV) was born in Manila.  He is Dr. Carlos C. Baylon.
He got his Master of Science degree at the University of the Philippines in Los Baños,  Laguna in 1981. He took his Ph. D. degree (Biology and Living Resources) at the University of Miami, U.S.A. in 1987 through the UPV-World Bank scholarship program.
Before he became the Dean of CFOS,  Dr. Baylon was the Director of the Institute of Fisheries  Planning and Development Studies, CFOS-UPV where he works as a professor.
As a fisheries scientist, Dr. Baylon has been involved in special projects and researches serving as member, consultant, national project director or project leader. 
In 1990 to 1996, he worked on shrimp culture. It was funded by the International Foundation for Science. In 1991 to 1993, he was a member of the Interdisciplinary Committee of the Food System Development Project for Fisheries Technology. In 1995, he was the chairperson of the committee that formulated the first Ph. D. Program in Fisheries  in the Philippines. Now this program has produced several  Ph. D. graduates.  The following year, Dr. Baylon  directed the project on strengthening research and training in population and development dynamics of rural fishing communities.
The results of some of his researches can be found in the following publications:
Baylon, C. C.  2003. Water quality dynamics during extensive and intensive culture of the tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon Fabricius. Philippine Agriculturist 86(2):182-194.
Baylon, C. C. 2001. The integrated municipal council as an institution for co-management in the coastal areas of the Philippines. In: Asian Fisheries Society, 6th Asian Fisheries Forum Book of Abstracts, November 25-30, 2001, Kaohsiung, Taiwan, p. 25.
Catedrilla, L. C., M. Andalecio and C. Baylon, eds. 1997. Establishing a policy basis for Philippine fisheries Development: IFDS Seminar series. Miag-ao, Iloilo: University of the Philippines in the Visayas, College o Fisheries.
Baylon, C. C. 1997. Population characteristics and trends of fishing communities in the Philippines and their relationship to the level of exploitation of fisheries resources. FAO Fisheries Report No. 566 on Workshop on Population Characteristics and Change in Coastal Fishing Communities, Madras, India, 10-14 March 1997.
Baylon, C. C. 1996. Polyculture and crop rotation in brackish-water shrimp: effect on soil and water quality. Proceedings of the International Foundation for Science (IFS)/European Union (EU) Workshop., Aquaculture Research and Sustainable Development in Inland and Coastal Regions in South-East Asia, Can Tho, Viet Nam, 18-22, March 1996.
Baylon, C. C. 1995. Polyculture and crop rotation: strategies for a sustainable prawn farming system. College of Fisheries, UP in the Visayas, Miag-ao, Iloilo. Terminal Report.
Baylon, C. 1993. Polyculture and crop rotation: strategies for a sustainable prawn farming system. Proceedings of the First IFS-NRCP Seminar Workshop. Manila, pp. 59-61.
Gallardo, W., M. de Castro, R. Buensuceso, C. Espegadera and C. Baylon. 1992. Gonad development of Placuna placenta fed Isochrysis glabana, Tetraselmis tetrahele or their combinations. Aquaculture 102:357-31.
Brand, L., M. Gottfried, C. Baylon and N. Romer. 1991. Spatial and temporal distribution of phytoplankton in Biscaye Bay, Florida. Bulletin of Marine Science 491:599-615.
Juliano, R. O. and C. C. Baylon. 1990. Aquaculture in the Philippines. In: Aquaculture I Asia (ed. By M. Mohan Joseph), pp. 303-324. Indian Branch, Asian Fisheries Society, Bangalore.
Baylon, C. C. 1989. Larvae rearing and settlement of the green mussel (Perna viridis). ASEAN Symposium on bivalve, 6-8 November, Dagupan City, Philippines.
Baylon, Carlos. 1988. Larval rearing and settlement of the green mussel, Perna viridis. May 1988. 118 leaves. Ph. D. Dissertation. University of Miami, Miami, Florida, USA.
Baylon, C. 1981. Chemical changes in a limed and flooded acid sulfate fishpond. 94 leaves. Thesis (M.S.)--College of Agriculture, UP Los Baños, Laguna. 
Fortes, RD, C. Baylon, T. Abalos. 1977. Use of rice straw as additional substrates for fishfood organisms in brackishwater ponds (Trial III). In: Inland Fisheries Technical Report nos. 11-12 U.P. College of Fisheries, Brackishwater Aquaculture Center, Leganes, Iloilo, pp. 63-69.

Dr. Carlos C. Baylon is married to a brilliant and beautiful lady, Prof. Juliana E. Corcino-Baylon. She teaches at the College of Arts and Sciences, UP Visayas and has published several papers on mudcrabs and milkfish.

Sources:
Cichon, Melchor F. 2009. Filipiniana thesis and dissertations on fisheries and  aquatic sciences. Unpublished.
Cichon, Melchor F. 2009. A bibliography of Philippine fishes and fisheries, 1895-2008. Unpublished.
UPV Directory of Expertise; A guide to University Human resources. 1996. University of the Philippines in the Visayas. Office of Research Coordination. Miag-ao, Iloilo.




Dr. Minda J. Formacion: A Profile
by
Melchor F. Cichon


The third lady UP Visayas Chancellor is a zoologist, and an administrator of the highest order.
The UP Board of Regents approved her appointment during its 123th meeting on September 29, 2008. She will serve as UPV Chancellor effective November 1, 2008 until October 31, 2011.
Born in 1946, in Sta. Cruz, Ilocos Sur, Dr. Minda J. Formacion is married and has two children.
Although her background is zoology (BS (Zoology, UP Diliman, 1966; M.A. in teaching (Biology), U.P. Diliman, 1975; MS (Zoology), U.P. Diliman, 1983, and Ph.D (Zoology), National University of Singapore, 1992), her recent researches focus mostly on fisheries.
So far her researches include microalgae as sources of bioactive compounds for fish health and nutrition; reproductive biology of the mud clam, Imbaw, the farming of sea cucumber and sea urchin.
Before this, she worked on the overripening of ovulated eggs of goldfish, the focus of her dissertation.
Dr. Formacion co-authored two textbooks entitled Basic Concept in Biology, 2003,  and Introduction to Biological Sciences, 2000. Her creative work, a learning object is "Sex Cells in the Making," considered as the first Learning Object to be uploaded in the UP Visayas website.
Dr. Formacion has been invited to present scientific papers in international conferences. In 1989, she was in Malaga, Spain during the 11th International Symposium on comparative Endocrinology. In 1992, she attended the 3rd Asian Fisheries Forum held in Singapore. This was followed in 1995 when she attended the 4th Asian Fisheries Forum in Beijing, China. In 2002, she attended the World Aquaculture 2002 Conference, also in Beijing, China.
Dr. Formacion had undergone research trainings in Japan on various occasions. She was an exchange researcher in Kagoshima University in 2006 in JSPS-DOST Core University Program in Fisheries Sciences. In 1982, she attended the 2nd International Training Course on Cell Biology of Early Development, sponsored by UNESCO, in Shimoda Marine Research Station and Sugashima Marine biological Station, Japan.
Her awards , grants and scholarships are many. Here are some:
Research Grants, Creative  and Research Program, UP System (2004-2005)
Best Adviser Award, Natural Sciences Cluster, 1st UPV graduate research conference, UPV, 2005.
UPV Chancellor's Award for Outstanding Published research (1995)
RP/IBRD Scholarship award, National University of Singapore, 1985-1989.
Monbusho Research Scholarship, Nagoya University, Japan, 1981-1983.

Because of her outstanding contributions to Philippine sciences, she has been elected member of both local and international professional organizations. She is a member, among others, of Women Association of Scientists of the Philippines (WASP), International Society for Molecular and Cell Biology Protocols and Researches (ISMCBPR), and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Aside from being a scientist, Dr. Formacion is an administrator. For two decades, Dr. Formacion has held several administrative positions which very few people had the opportunity to hold on.  Before she became the third lady UPV Chancellor, she was the Chair of the Division of Biological Sciences, UPV College of Arts and Sciences (UV-CAS) from 1979-1981; 1983-1985.  In 1994, she became a Faculty Regent, Board of Regents, UP System. From 1996 to 2002, she was the Dean of the UPV CAS. In 2005, she was the Chair of the Search Committee for Chancellor, UP Mindanao, and consequently, became Chair of the Search Committee for Chancellor, UP Visayas.   
Here is one philosophy that she holds on: "Once I arrived at a certain decision, that's it." That is how methodological and firm she is in her decision making.
These academic, administrative and other qualities of a lady made her the best choice for the UPV Chancellor.



Dr. Jesus Juario: The A1 Filipino Fisheries Scientist
By
Melchor F. Cichon

In 2007, I prepared a site that features the birthdays of famous Filipinos in different fields like sports, business, movies, and science.
One of those that I included was Dr. Jesus Juario, a Filipino fisheries scientist.
I have read a lot about him, especially his contribution in the spawning of captured milkfish that became the basis for the development of the milkfish, siganid and seabass hatchery technologies at SEAFDEC AQD (1977 – 1986).
Since I am biased towards people who are trailblazers, I wanted to interview Dr. Juario to know more about him. Unfortunately, I really had no chance to be near him. If ever I had the chance to be close to him, I could not also talk to him as he was always busy.
When I became a member of the search committee to select a dean of the UPV Cebu College, I was in this college for about two days. I thought it was a good chance for me to interview him. I was not lucky. He was too busy for me.
Meanwhile, I collected some articles about him and compiled a list of his publications.
Of course, that collection of mine was not enough. I knew he has done so much that I was not aware of.
Then one afternoon someone told me that Dr. Juario wanted to get my email address.
Unfortunately, again, I could not give one because somebody hacked my email and I had not applied for a new one.
Two months after, I accidentally found his email address.
I emailed him and inquired why he was asking for my email address.
He said he found in a Google site that I wrote something about him and he wanted to update me of his many accomplishments particularly his publications, the seminars/workshops he attended and more.
In our next email exchanges, he hinted that he was already in the United States of America. I had been thinking that he was still teaching in UPV Cebu College, Cebu City, Philippines where many of his brilliant ideas flourished. I did not remember that he turned down the offer to run as UPV Chancellor in 2005 because he only had about a year and a half left before his retirement, and he wanted to join his wife and children in the US upon retirement from UP Visayas as a faculty member.
To quench my thirst, he sent me a copy of his biobrief and a summary of his accomplishments. With very little editing, I am presenting here his inspiring profile:
Dr. Jesus Villarosa Juario was born on August 6, 1942 in Carcar, Cebu. He is the youngest son in a family of five. He graduated Bachelor of Science in Zoology magna cum laude from the University of San Carlos, Cebu City, in March 1963, and finished his Master of Science in Zoology at the University of Hawaii, U.S.A., in May 1967 through an East-West Center Graduate Scholarship. His Ph.D. degree focused on Biology (Marine Biology) with a grade of "sehr gut" at the University of Hamburg, Germany through a German Academic Exchange Service (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst) Graduate Scholarship in July 1974.
Developed to become a scientist, Dr. Juario worked on marine nematodes.
As a scientist, Dr. Juario erected one genus and described 11 new species of free-living marine nematodes while working for his doctoral degree at the Institute for Marine Research in Bremerhaven, Germany. Together with other scientists from the Aquaculture Department of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC AQD), he developed the technique to capture and transport wild adult milkfish and rear them in captivity. In April 1977, together with Dr. Hiralal Chaudhuri, he spawned for the first time wild adult milkfish in captivity and subsequently confirmed that the fry collected by Delsman in 1929 from Indonesian waters and identified by him as milkfish were indeed milkfish fry. The results of their study were presented in Paimpont, France during the international symposium on the Reproductive Physiology of Fishes (Sept. 19-22, 1977). In the years that followed, he developed together with Ms. Marietta N. Duray, the technique to spawn milkfish, Chanos chanos, in captivity and later on the technique to spawn the siganid, Siganus guttatus, and the sea bass, Lates calcarifer, in captivity and rear the resulting larvae to metamorphosis. This formed as the basis for the development of the milkfish, siganid and seabass hatchery technology at SEAFDEC AQD (1977 – 1986). In 1979, he had a chance to work with Dr. I-Chiu Liao as an exchange scientist at the Tungkang Marine Laboratory in Taiwan on the hatchery of the grey mullet, Mugil cephalus, and with Dr. Ching Ming Kuo in 1980 as an exchange scientist at the Oceanic Institute in Hawaii to work on milkfish hatchery. As a research fellow at the Johannes-Gutenberg University in Mainz, Frankfurt, Germany, he worked with Prof. Dr. R. Reinboth (June to July 1982) on certain aspects of milkfish reproduction and with Prof. Dr. Volker Storch (August to September 1982) of the University of Heidelberg to develop a rapid technique of assessing the nutritional quality of feed/diets through electron microscopy. Together with Prof. Storch and Mr. Helmut Segner, a doctoral candidate, he has shown for the first time through electron microscopy that milkfish larvae could not digest Chlorella, the phytoplankton commonly used at that time together with rotifers to rear milkfish larvae to metamorphosis.
Because of his expertise in milkfish/finfish hatchery and culture, he was hired by the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) as the UNDP Aquaculture Expert for the Republic of Kiribati (September 1984 to June 1986) to explore the possibility of establishing a milkfish hatchery in Christmas Island (Kiritimati) and to develop, using local resources, a technique of producing milkfish fingerlings in ponds to be used as tuna baits.
In September 1986, Dr. Juario decided to leave SEAFDEC AQD and teach full time at the University of the Philippines in the Visayas Cebu College (UPVCC) so he could be with his family. While teaching at UPVCC, he was hired as a consultant by several private companies that were into milkfish/finfish and prawn hatchery and culture. One of the companies that hired him as a consultant was the Atlas Prawn Corporation in Balamban, Cebu. Together with its Fisheries Technicians, he developed a pond culture technique for the production of grouper fingerlings from fry collected from the wild, a technique for the commercial production of marketable-sized grouper in cages, and for the live transport of grouper fingerlings and marketable-sized fish.
In recognition of his works and significant contribution to Marine Biology, especially to the aquaculture industry in the Philippines, the Department of Science and Technology, Region VII, chose him in 1990 as the Outstanding Scientist for Region VII.
In 1995-1996, Dr. Juario together with a DED consultant, Dr. Jörg Pilz used GIS to develop a Coastal Environmental Information System (CEIS) for the Management of Marine Resources in Cebu. After the institution of the CEIS Project at UPVCC, he was able to get research grants from USAID, DED, BFAR-FRMP and GTZ. This enabled him to involve several biology, social sciences faculty and graduate students to conduct studies related to coastal resource management and encouraged them to publish their results in peer-reviewed journals.
While a faculty member at UPVCC, he was also hired as a World Bank consultant for the preparation of the Central Visayas Regional Project Phase 2 Proposal for the Fisheries Sector – a community-based coastal resource management approach (Jan. 15, 1995 – April 15, 1995) and as PRIMEX consultant for the preparation of a project proposal supported by Asian Development Bank on "Integrated Milkfish Broodstock and Hatchery Fry Production for Western Visayas," (April 16, 1995 to May 15, 1995).
He was appointed chairperson of CHED’s Regional Quality Assessment Team for Science and Mathematics (1995 to 2000), of the Technical Evaluation Committee for the multimillion Fisheries Sector Research Projects (Aquaculture Research Projects) of the Dept. of Agriculture (1995,1996), of the Technical Evaluation Committee of the multimillion high impact AFMA Projects of the Dept. of Agriculture, Bureau of Agricultural Research (1999), of the Technical Committee that reviews research proposals from the Visayas for PCAMRD-DOST funding (1995 to 2004) and of the Technical Committee of BFAR-VII that reviews research proposals and determines together with participants from different universities and colleges, the private sector, people’s and non-government organizations, the research directions of BFAR-VII (1990-2006).
In addition, he usually chaired the Technical Committee created by DENR-VII to review EIA, IEE and EIS (Feb. 2000 – 2006) before the issuance of ECCs. He was also a member of the screening committee created by NEDA to award graduate degree scholarships and training grants to applicants from the Visayas.
Dr. Juario, has been invited as speaker/resource person in many seminars, workshops and short term trainings related to aquaculture including the series of seminars held by the Technology and Livelihood Resource Center in Manila and to speak on topics related to Environmental/Coastal Resource Management and preparing research proposals and scientific papers for publication in peer reviewed journals.
During his sabbatical leave in 2003-2004, he was hired by USAID through DAI (Development Alternatives Inc.) as Fisheries Specialist and as LGU CRM Planning Specialist to facilitate the formulation of the CRM Plan for the Municipalities of Poro and Tudela in Camotes and Balamban, Cebu.
Together with some UPV faculty, he also facilitated the formulation of the CRM Plan for the municipality of Dumangas through a CIDA-funded project, "Principles in Practice in Ocean and Coastal Governance."
His legendary examinations and teaching methods had given him a very special place in the hearts of the many undergraduate and graduate students he had taught through the years. His unwavering principle and emphasis on academic excellence has made him a standard for the UPVCC biology faculty and students to emulate. His commitment to students is not only limited to class hours. He offers tutorials and group reviews and makes his consultation hours enjoyable.
In recognition of his accomplishments as a teacher and researcher and his services to the community, he was chosen by the University of the Philippines in the Visayas as the most Outstanding Faculty of UPVCC for 1986-1989 and by Metrobank as the Most Outstanding Teacher (College Level) for 1992 representing the provinces in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao.
As the former Chairperson of the Natural Sciences Division and Dean of UPVCC, Dr. Juario had accomplished considerable and significant improvements and projects that far exceeded the achievements of previous administrators of the College.
To put everything in a nutshell, he was the very first Dean to be awarded a resolution by the UPVCC Student Council acknowledging his exceptional legacies and major contributions to the College. In addition, he received a Plaque of Recognition from the Civil Service Commission for being chosen as the semi-finalist from the Visayas for the Civil Service Pag-asa Award as an Academic Administrator and a very aptly worded Certificate of Appreciation from the UPV Chancellor which any Dean would surely dream to have.
Popularly known to the faculty, staff and students as a "hands-on" Dean, during his term new laboratories (biology, computer science, physics, chemistry, psychology, computerized radio room, TV production room, newsroom, the darkroom and workshop for the Fine Arts) were constructed, sophisticated laboratory and audio-visual equipment were acquired and other facilities were built through the financial grants he procured from the Government of Japan, Senator John Osmeña and the late Senator Marcelo Fernan.
This truly reflects his commitment to provide UPVCC students with quality education and service. He firmly believes that if students and faculty members are provided with well equipped laboratories and comfortable and clean classrooms, then teaching and learning will be effective and creativity among faculty and students will be greatly enhanced. His professional work attitude, work ethics and dedication have been a model to his staff and colleagues, making them more efficient and accommodating, perhaps as a consequence of his strong belief in leadership by example.
Dr. Juario has authored and co-authored 19 papers published in ISI-indexed journals, 11 in peer–reviewed  national journals, 5 in International Scientific Proceedings, 5  in other national journals and newsletters, and a chapter of the book, "Production of Aquatic Animals – Fishes" a World Animal Science Series published by Elsevier and edited by C.E. Nash and A.J. Novotny, and 16 technical reports. He edited 2 and co-edited 1 international scientific proceedings and had been the executive editor of the peer reviewed UPV Journal of Natural Sciences from 1995-2006. In addition, he has presented 19 papers in international and national conferences, symposia and workshops. As a service to the private sector, to the aquaculture industry, and to the community he has authored and co-authored 15 extension manuals on either the hatchery or culture of milkfish, siganids and groupers, on the culture of Eucheuma and Caulerpa and on coastal resource management. As a teacher and trainor, he prepared 10 lecture notes for the international and national training programs of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, the UNDP/FAO Network of Aquaculture Centers in Asia and the University of the Philippines in the Visayas and lecture notes on Genetics, Animal Physiology, General Physiology, G.E. Biology and Scientific Writing for UPVCC students.
Dr. Juario is married to Dr. Hosanna A. Famador, an obstetrician-gynecologist and a registered nurse presently (2008) working in Florida. They are blessed with three sons: two are both doctors of medicine and physical therapists and are now working in Florida; the youngest, a nurse, will join them soon.
Looking back, here are some illuminating words from Dr. Juario when this writer asked his opinions on various issues that relate to Philippine fisheries science and Philippine fisheries industry.
M. Cichon (MC) 1. What made you focus your career in fisheries?
Dr. Juario (Dr. J) Our fishery resources are dwindling not only because of the destruction of natural habitats but also because of ineffective implementation of our fishery laws. I believe I would be helping our country a lot and could help most especially the municipal fishermen to improve their lives if I will focus my career in fisheries and aquaculture and develop techniques or resource management schemes that would improve our dwindling fishery resources.
MC) 2. What do you consider your most important contribution to Philippine Fisheries?
Dr. J) 2a. The development of techniques, together with other SEAFDEC researchers, to spawn milkfish, Chanos chanos, the siganid, Siganus guttatus, and the seabass, Lates calcarifer, in captivity and rearing their resultant larvae to metamorphosis. The development of these techniques would improve the availability or supply of the fingerlings of these species for culture in ponds and cages. The results of my studies connected with the development of these techniques have been published in ISI-indexed journals (please refer to my list of publications).
Dr. J) 2b. The development of techniques, together with fisheries technicians from the Soriano – owned Atlas Prawn Corporation, to produce grouper fingerlings from wild caught fry for stocking in cages and the development of a technique to rear grouper fingerlings to marketable size in floating net cages. The results of these studies were presented in an international scientific conference.
(MC) 3. What makes Philippine Fisheries Science and Fisheries Industry so slow in their development and how can we tackle these two issues so that our future generations will have good memories about us?
(Dr. J) 3a.  I think these are some of the most important reasons why Philippine Fisheries Science is so slow in its development:
(Dr. J) 3a.1 Unfortunately, the majority of our fisheries scientists do not and, in fact, many cannot publish their works in ISI-indexed journals because there is something wrong with either the review of literature, data collection, experimental design or the way the paper is written. They would rather write a technical report, which is very easy to do, or publish their findings in local journals which do not require any peer review.
3a. 2) There are many  colleges and universities  offering graduate (masteral and doctoral) programs in Fisheries but  their graduate faculty have not published a single paper  in ISI-indexed journal or even in national peer-reviewed journals. Worse, most of these colleges and universities do not have subscriptions to or cannot access ISI-indexed journals or at least Current Contents or Abstracts that would include ISI-indexed journals. This in turn would make it very difficult for fisheries scientists in these colleges or universities to write  papers that could be published in ISI-indexed journals.
These two alone would significantly hinder the rapid  development of fisheries science in the Philippines.  To improve the rate of development of Philippine Fisheries Science: a) fisheries scientists should be encouraged to  publish their works in ISI-indexed journals, for example, UP and SEAFDEC AQD give significant monetary rewards if their faculty members will publish in ISI-indexed journals;  b) only colleges and universities that have the faculty with the appropriate graduate degree and publications  in ISI-indexed or at least  peer-reviewed journals and with  appropriate journal subscriptions in their library should be allowed to offer  graduate degrees in Fisheries. 
(Dr. J) 3b. I think these are some of the most important reasons why The Fisheries Industry in the Philippines is slow in its development:
(Dr. J) 3b.1. Based on my personal observations, there is  no effective coordination among the  three national agencies (PCAMRD of DOST, BAR-BFAR of DA, and the ERDB of DENR) involved in Fisheries Research and Development. To worsen the situation, another R&D agency, the NFRDI, was created. It appears to me that NFRDI and PCAMRD may have more or less the same functions; I hope each institution  will  define their  specific functions to avoid duplication in their activities.  If  coordination among these agencies are significantly improved or if there is only one agency that will be in charge of R&D in Fisheries, then it would be easier to identify research directions and priorities which in turn will facilitate or hasten the development of much needed technologies to improve fisheries or aquaculture production and the development of management schemes that will significantly increase  fish population or significantly improve our fisheries and prevent further destruction of our coastal and/or marine resources.
(Dr. J) 3b.2. Unfortunately, there are still national funding agencies that give financial support  to researchers who have never published in ISI-indexed nor even in national peer-reviewed journals. Usually  the output of these researchers are not or cannot be published in ISI-indexed nor in national peer-reviewed journals and will just end up as technical reports or papers published in local journals that are not included in Abstracts nor in Current Contents. Consequently,  the output of these researchers will just fall under unverified techniques or technologies since experts from different parts of the world or even from the Philippines will have difficulty in accessing their papers or reports. Worse, the same national funding agencies continuously give financial support to these researchers or research institutions even if they have not published their findings in ISI-indexed journals especially if they have good connections with the funding institutions. This is, of course, a very big hindrance to the rapid development of our fisheries industry. National funding agencies should stop giving financial support to researchers who have not published their previous works in ISI-indexed journals to significantly improve the rate of development of our fisheries industry; or  national funding agencies should make it a condition sine qua non for researchers to publish their findings in ISI-indexed journals if they will be given financial support. In addition, national funding agencies should also stop giving awards to papers that have not been previously published in ISI-indexed journals or  papers that are presented in national conferences but which are not publishable even in national peer reviewed journals because there is something  wrong with the review of literature, the experimental design and  analysis of data. If our national funding agencies will continue to award papers which are not even publishable in national peer reviewed journals, this will give a wrong signal especially to our budding fisheries scientists and will surely be a hindrance to the rapid development of our fisheries science and industry.
(Dr. J) 3b.3. There is a very serious lack of good extension workers who can extend promising research results to our fisheries industry. A very good group of extension workers is a very important link between good research institutions/fisheries scientists and the industry. I firmly believe that if a very good group of extension workers would be available, this will enhance or significantly improve the rate of development of our fisheries industry. This same group of extension workers should be able to give a feedback to the scientists or generators of technology or management schemes as to  how a  newly developed production technique/technology or management scheme  be improved to suit the needs of the local environment. Production technologies/techniques  especially for fisheries and aquaculture and  management schemes for coastal resources are very often not only species but also location specific.
(Dr. J.) 3b.4. The national government and  the private sector do not give sufficient financial support to improve the capability of fisheries research institutions so these could contribute to the rapid development of fisheries science and industry.. Perhaps it might be better to have a separate Department of Fisheries so our government and, perhaps the private sector, can focus its attention on how to improve the rate of the development of our fisheries science and industry.
(Dr. J) 3b.5. Unfortunately, the implementation of our  Fishery Laws is poor and ineffective. Violators (most especially owners of commercial fishing vessels) should be penalized regardless of who they are or regardless of their connections - political or personal. For as long as government officials  will base their decision on patronage or electoral votes, the Fisheries Industry will stay as it is now in our country.
(Dr. J) 3b.6. Unfortunately, there are still a good number of people in the fisheries industry who would believe more in foreign or imported technology rather than help support or improve those generated by Filipino scientists who publish their results in ISI- indexed journals. This is, of course, very much related to our crab mentality. The Fisheries Industry can encourage or motivate Filipino scientists to be more creative and develop or improve better production techniques or better resource management schemes if the industry support them either by giving them financial support for their work or acknowledging what they have done for the industry.
(With additional inputs from Dr. Jesus Juario)





Dr. Ida M. Siason: A Fisheries Social Scientist
By
Melchor F. Cichon
January 29, 2008



Yes, she did not study fisheries.
After receiving her high school diploma as a valedictorian at the Assumption College Iloilo in 1966, she studied at Maryknoll College in Quezon City for an A.B. English degree (1970). In 1974, she got an M.A. in Psychology from Ateneo de Manila University. She received her Ph.D. (Social Psychology) from Pennsylvania State University at University Park in 1992  with minor emphasis on Rural Sociology.
Indeed her educational background has nothing to do with fisheries.
Because of this, she focused her researches and publications  on  the  social sciences. 
But she has conducted some researches and published articles and monographs on the social science aspects of fisheries. And her background on psychology and sociology make her an effective researcher on this discipline.
Dr. Siason, or Ida to her colleagues was born on July 30, 1950 and is married to Mr. Pedro Siason.
Almost immediately after her graduation from college, Dr. Siason worked as a Researcher at the Central Guidance Bureau, Ateneo de Manila, from 1972 to 1973. But she transferred to the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA), Region 6, as a social services specialist from 1974 to 1978. She again moved to the Commission of Population (POPCOM), Region VI as Population Project Officer in and stayed there for one year.
Her latest destination was at the University of the Philippines in the Visayas, Iloilo City where she worked as Coordinator for Research and Development, College of Arts and Sciences.
Being a talented and career-oriented person, Dr. Siason was promoted to Associate Director of Research, UPV, from 1981 to 1982. 
In 1987, she became one of the few Filipinos who received a Fulbright Scholarship for a Doctoral Studies in the U.S.A. While she was pursuing her PhD. Degree, she worked as an instructor of psychology at the Department of Psychology, Pennsylvania State University  from 1990-1991.
The following year, she got her Ph.D. degree. Her Ph.D. dissertation is entitled: “Predicting the Continuation of Volunteer Behavior, using Structural Equations with Latent Variables.”
When she returned to the University of the Philippines in the Visayas (now U.P. Visayas) she eventually became the Chair of the Social Science Division, UPV. And became the UPV Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs from1993 to 1999.  She eventually became Chancellor of the University of the Philippines Visayas from 1998 to 2005.
In her final report, she said among other things: “Some people dream of worthy accomplishments while others stay awake and do them.”
She reported, among other things, that  “In the Pursuit of Academic Excellence, the colleges have reviewed and revised most of their academic programs, making these more responsive to the changing and rapidly evolving needs that characterize the different fields of knowledge. Noteworthy are: the single BS Fisheries program which emerged from its heretofore conventional four majors offerings; the streamlining of the management program, and the opening up in UPV Cebu College of its innovative BA Industrial Design program.”
Among the honors she received are the following: 3rd Place, research Paper for 2000 given by the National Aquatic Research and Development System; Best research Paper  Award, PCAMRD Visayas Zonal Program and Fulbright Scholarship Grantee for Doctoral Studies.
Between these years, Dr. Siason has been involved in various researches covering human behavior, mental health, patterns on decision making, among others, either as a study leader or a team member.   She has also published  and presented  papers in the Philippines and abroad on various topics.

Among the fisheries researches and publications Dr. Saison has completed are as follows:

Siason, I. & Baliao, E. 1987. “Decision-making patterns among subsistence fishermen in selected Philippine barangays,” UPV.
Siason, I. & Ticao, C. 1996. Enforcement and compliance with fisheries regulation in the Philippines, UPV.
Siason, I. “Decision-making among subsistence fishermen in selected Philippine Barangays,’ International conference of the International Institute of  Fisheries Economics and Trade, August 1994, Taipei.
Siason, I. “Women in fishing communities”, Asia-Pacific Regional Workshop on the Role of Women in fisheries Development, July 17, 1995, Iloilo City.
Siason, I. and Subade, R. F. (ed). 1995. Seminar proceedings: Community-based management of coastal resources, ICLAR: AFSSRN research Report Series.
Siason, I. et al. 2002. Women in fisheries in Asia. In: Global symposium on women in fisheries; edited by M. J. Williams, et al., pp. 21-48.
Siason, I. M. 2001. Women in fisheries in the Philippines. In: International symposium on Women in Asian Fisheries, ed. by M. J. Williams, M.C. Nandeesha, V. P. Corral and E. Tech., pp. 69-77
Siason, I. as Study Leader.  Enforcement and compliance with fisheries regulation in selected Philippine fishing communities, 1995, Grant from ICLARM Co-Management Project.
Viswanathan, K., Abdulla, N.M., Susilowati I, Siason, I., and Ticao, C. 1997. Enforcement and compliance with fisheries regulations in Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines. ICLAR: Fisheries Co-Management research project research Report No. 5.

Sources:

Her curriculum vitae. No date.  8p.
Siason, Ida M. October 2005. “My report for UPV”. UPViews 6(11):1-2.





Dr. Alice Joan G. Ferrer:
The Restless Beauty and Brain
By
Melchor F. Cichon
February 6, 2008


“I am restless and I feel guilty when I do nothing.”
This was her response when I asked her how she describes herself.
And her restlessness pays.
Since her graduation from college in 1991, she has been involved in scientific researches, and creative works, including dream analysis. Her latest craze is painting on egg shells.
Dr. Alice Joan G. Ferrer, or Alice, as she is fondly called by her colleagues, was born in Dumangas, Iloilo. But her family moved to Jaro, Iloilo City when she was already 13 years old, about to start first year high school. But now she resides in Guimaras with her husband, Jerry, and her three children. Her eldest, a girl, is taking up nursing.
Alice is the fourth of the five siblings. Two of her sisters are chemical engineers, while her other sister is a medical doctor. Their youngest, a boy, is a police officer.
After graduation from high school as salutatorian from the West Visayas State University, she enrolled at the UP Visayas College of Arts and Sciences, majoring in economics and psychology.
“Truly”, she said, “I did not like economics. In fact, it was not me who filled up my UPCAT application form. My sister’s boyfriend did it for me.  My mother wanted me to take up law to help the poor. But truly I did not know what to get in college.”
After studying some units in economics, she thought of shifting to management. But she disregarded the idea when she realized that it would take her longer time to finish her degree.
But eventually, she loved the course. She in fact was a Drillon-Fonacier Scholar for two years.
After graduation in 1991, she was hired by her alma mater as a faculty. In 1993, while teaching, she enrolled in the Master in Management (Public Management) program of the College of Management, U.P. Visayas, Iloilo City. Unfortunately, she was not able to take the comprehensive exam for graduation because in June 1995 she started graduate school in UP Diliman.
In 1996, she received her MA in economics degree, and in 2003 her Ph.D. in Economics also in UP Diliman. She was actually one of the two students in their batch of 24 students who was invited to continue their second year in the PhD program as a straight program. She accepted the invitation and at the same time made sure she would receive her master’s diploma ahead of time. She got it after 1.5 years.  That is, she still continued with the requirements of a master’s degree  for one semester, while at the same time was in the PhD program. 
On her return to the CAS, UPV, after Ph.D., she conducted her first research entitled: Sexuality Education in Secondary High Schools in Iloilo City. She did it, as she wanted to do something different from economics
Then she was given a Chancellor Grant for a returning Ph. D. holder.
That started her romance with fisheries research, although her undergraduate thesis was on the economics of milkfish in Iloilo City.
Her thesis is so relevant to the fisheries industry in the Philippines as it was cited in one of the big projects funded by the Dutch government by a professor from the College of Fisheries, UP Visayas in the early 1990s. She was informed that the proponent saved a lot of money because of her thesis.
And in a span of four years, Alice was able to complete 20 researches, published 8 scientific articles and two poems. She has presented 15 papers in various conferences and symposia, both local and abroad. She also received 4 awards, and had gone to Malaysia, China, India, and People’s Republic of China.
She was also a member of the CIDA project, ISLE Health Team,  even while she was away in graduate school. She worked with Dr. Ida Siason and Prof. Nera Katalbas in the health team from UPV.  The BS in Public Health  was one of the outputs and the course PH101 (Health Challenges in Island Context). With  ISLE she  was able to visit  Jamaica twice (University of West Indies) and Canada (Dalhousie University).   ISLE is Island Sustainability Livelihood and Equity.
Also, she was invited for a study mission in Newfoundland, Canada by the International Development Research Centre to look at the experience of the province with cod moratorium for 15 years. 
So it seems that this busy lady has no more time for her kids and her husband.
“I make it a point that I eat supper with them, and when they wake up I am with them. And on weekends, if I am not in the field conducting research, I spent my time with them. But even then, I do something to keep me busy. I either write or paint.”
And when I asked Alice what triggered her to go to fisheries, she said: “There are a lot of opportunities, challenges, and happiness in fisheries, especially when I  see the finished reports, beside the money and travel.”
She enjoyed going to different places in the country to interview fishers, government officials, government planners. And in the past years, she was able to visit the People's Republic of China, India, Thailand and Malaysia to present her research findings and get more foreign contacts.
Here are some of the titles of her researches and published works on fisheries: 

Project Leader:   Health Assessment Component.   Social  and Health Assessment and Economic Valuation of MT Solar 1-Petron Oil Spill Off Guimaras Island, Philippines.  September 2006 – January 31, 2007. Funded by the National Disaster  and Coordinating Council (NDCC).
Study leader.   “Health Care Services Utilization and Cost Among Residents of Mt Solar 1 Oil Spill- Affected Coastal Barangays In Guimaras.” Social and Health Assessment and Economic Valuation of MT Solar 1-Petron Oil Spill Off  Guimaras Island, Philippines. September 2006 – January 31,   2007. Funded by the National Disaster and Coordinating Council (NDCC).
Study Leader. “Understanding the Responses To Oil Spill of the Residents of Affected Coastal Barangays In Guimaras.”  Social and Health Assessment and Economic Valuation of MT Solar 1-Petron Oil Spill Off Guimaras Island, Philippines. September 2006 – January 31, 2007. Funded by the National Disaster and Coordinating Council (NDCC)
Study Leader.  “Acute Health Problems Among Cleanup Workers of  MT Solar 1 Oil Spill In Guimaras,  Philippines.”  Social and Health Assessment and Economic Valuation of MT Solar 1-Petron Oil Spill Off Guimaras   Island, Philippines. September 2006 – January 31, 2007. Funded by the National Disaster and Coordinating Council (NDCC)
Co-Study Leader. Health Situation and Health   Protection Practices Among Clean  Up Workers in Nueva Valencia, Guimaras.  Social and Health   Assessment and Economic Valuation of MT Solar 1-Petron  Oil Spill Off Guimaras Island, Philippines.  September 2006 January 31, 2007. Funded by the National Disaster and  Coordinating Council  (NDCC).
Project Leader.   “Assessment of the Nature and Viability of the Northern Iloilo Alliance for Coastal Development.”  Funded by the VisSea Project of the German Technical Cooperation (GTZ) and Department of Agriculture-Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (DA-BFAR). July 1, 2004 to March 31, 2005.
Project Leader. “Assessment of the Operation of the Bantay Dagat in Iloilo Province and Sagay City, Negros Occidental.”  Funded by the VisSea Project of the German Technical Cooperation (GTZ) and Department of Agriculture-Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resourcces (DA-BFAR). July 15, 2004 to March 31, 2005.
Project Leader. “Factors Influencing the Entry of Young People into the Fishing Sector of the Visayan Sea.”  Funded by the VisSea Project of the German Technical Cooperation (GTZ) and Department of Agriculture-Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resourcces (DA-BFAR). July 23, 2004 to March 31, 2005.   
Assistant Project Coordinator and Team Leader for the Concepcion Study. “Fish Fights over Fish Rights: Managing Exit from the Fisheries and Security Implications for Southeast Asia – the Philippine Case Study.” Funded by The WorldFish Center and the Ford Foundation.  May 1, 2004 to December 31, 2004
Researcher. “Sex and Nutritional Status of Underseven Children in the Coastal Barangays in Buenavista, Guimaras.” Self-financed research.  May 2004 to July 2004.
Co-Project Leader. “The Philippine Fish Processing and Postharvest Industry: An Assessment and Review of Resources, Technology and Socioeconomics.” August 1, 2001 to July 31, 2002.  Funded by the Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture.
Project Leader. “Devolution of Health Care Services in the Philippines.” A joint project entitled, “Decentralization Experience ISLE-Health Partner Countries”, of  the Island Sustainability, Livelihood and Equity-Health Committee with members from the University of the Philippines in the Visayas, Dalhousie University(Canada), University of Prince Edward Island (Canada),   Hassanudin University (Indonesia), and University of the West Indies (Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago).  January 1999 to November 2000. Funded by the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA).
Co-Project Leader, Economics and Management of Gillnet and Seine Fishing in Guimaras Strait and Adjacent Waters,  1993.  Funded by Asian Fisheries Social Science Research Network-International Center for Living Aquatic Resources and management. (AFSSRN-ICLARM).
Project Leader. Evaluation of Fisheries Management Options for the Visayan Sea: The case  of northern Iloilo. August 1, 2007 to July 30, 2008.  Funded by the Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia.  (on-going)
Health Assessment and Monitoring of Residents of Lapaz and San Roque, Nueva Valencia, Guimaras Exposed to MT Solar 1 Oil Spill.  October 1, 2007 to September 30, 2008.  Funded by the National Disaster  and Coordinating Council (NDCC).
Publications

Ferrer, AJG. 2006. “Gender and Nutritional Status of Underseven Children in the Coastal  Barangays in Buenavista, Guimaras.”  Edited by Choo, P.S., S.J. Hall and M.J. Williams. Global Symposium on Gender and Fisheries: Seventh Asian Fisheries Forum, 1-2 December 2004, Penang, Malaysia. Malaysia: WorldFish Center. Pp 59-68.
Ferrer, Alice Joan G., Michele Amor Maroliña, and Yoko Tampos. 2004. “Profitability of Sergisted Shrimp (Acetes spp.) Catching Using Saludan and Sungkit in Tigbauan, Iloilo.”  Danyag (UPV Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities), 7(1&2, June): 19-33.
Pestaño, M.C.,  A.J. Ferrer and  J.A. Jusayan. 1998. “The Economics of Gillnet Fishing in the Philippines”, In: J Roch, S. Nurhakim, J. Widodo and A. Poernomo (eds), Proceedings of the Social-Economics Innovation and Management (SOSEKIMA) of Java Sea Pelagic Fisheries. 4-7 December 1995. Bandungan, Semarang, Indonesia.

She said that since the Philippine fisheries is such a complex entity, it is difficult to solve its many problems.
And the main culprit of these problems are the people themselves and their desire for more money. This is simply a case of mismanagement.
With the increase of Philippine population, which is now about 88.7 millions, and with their increasing average life span, more and more fish are needed to meet their basic needs. This includes sustainable livelihood and enough income. And once people start fishing, it is difficult to get them out of this system, especially so with the sustenance fishermen. With their low income, their children will eventually follow the footsteps of their fathers since going to school is almost next to impossible. So they end up as fishers.
One way of changing this vicious cycle, according to Dr. Ferrer,  is to bring the schools where these children are. But then again, do we have the money to establish and maintain them?
According to Dr. Ferrer, the other problem why the Philippine fisheries is not that much developed is because of the lack of logistics on the part of the planners and the law enforcers and the technical assistance being provided to all stakeholders. And there is a possibility that the law enforcers can be corrupted by the commercial fishermen or be pressured by the politicians to do unlawful fishing activities.
This reminds me of the article of Aguilar et al.(2003). He said:

”With the implementation of the Fisheries Code or RA 8550 and the definition of municipal waters in the Local Government Code, the mode has shifted from an open access fishery where everyone can fish anywhere to a territorial based one where local control of municipal waters is left to the Local government Unit. While accommodations to commercial fisheries from the 10.1 to 15 kilometers distance to the municipal within the law, local control of municipal waters represents a challenge to the municipal fisheries in terms of balancing sustainability with production requirements. Periodical comprehensive socio-economic and ecosystem evaluation is required to assess effectiveness and efficiency of mechanisms defined by the provision of the law.
 “Two weaknesses in the local government units are identified as a major hindrance in implementing the laws mandated for coastal resources management. One is the lack of technical assistance to help them in understanding fisheries management in relation to the national laws. Second is the lack of funds to institute fisheries patrols, surveillance systems and effective legal procedures to assess fines and other such legal procedures,” (pp. 193-194).
So how can these problems be solved?

According to Dr. Ferrer, with more than half of the 1650 municipalities in the country are coastal municipalities, and with the vast marine waters around us which are now almost depleted, there must be an independent department to oversee the Philippine fisheries, not just a bureau of the Department of Agriculture so that it can have its own budget and can drive its own course.
Meanwhile, she wishes to work on the Visayan Sea (VisSea) because though it has so much marine resources, it is least studied, although, VisSea has its own problems. Hopefully, there will be a management regime that can minimize if not eradicate its current problems and this management program can be replicated in other fishing grounds in the country.
Indeed the Visayan Sea is one of the most productive fishing grounds in the Philippines.
It is enclosed by the island-provinces of Cebu, Masbate, Iloilo and Negros Occidental and it is located between 11 and 12 degrees North latitude and 123 and 124 degrees East longitude. It is approximately 10,000 square kilometers wide.
A large amount of fishes and other fishery products are caught in this area like: barracudas, big-eyed scad, bogies, dolphin fishes, eels, flatfishes, frigate tuna, gizzard shads (kabasi), goatfishes, groupers, lizard fishes, marlin, milkfish, moonfish, moray, rays, round herring, roundscad, sailfish, sea bass, sea catfishes, shark, siganids, skipjack, slipmouths, snapper (maya-maya), Spanish mackerels, surgeon fish, sword fish, and threadfin breams (bisugo).
The Visayan sea is also abundant of the following: abalones, clams, cockles, crabs, lobsters, mussels, oysters, prawns, scallops, seaweeds, shells, shrimps, sponges, squids, and turtles.
Below is the commercial production of Visayan Sea from 1953 to 1995.

Year Visayan Sea (in kg) Philippines (in kg)

1955---25,086,591---362,927,057
1960---25,977,720---444,622,000
1965---70,148,280---667,202,000
1970---89,992,640---988,884,000
1975---181,030,900---1,336,803,000
1980---135,226,000---1,672,254,000
1985---not available---2,052,111,000
1990---150,854,000---2,503,546,000
1995---120,267,000---2,785,085,000

Dr. Alice Joan G. Ferrer is young, but her accomplishments as a researcher is legion. For sure her thoughts as reflected in her numerous researches and publications will have a far-reaching impacts on the way we manage our natural resources.

Sources:

Aguilar, Glenn D. et al. 2003. Knowledge based tools for supporting fisheries management. UPV Journal of. Natural  Science 8:192-204.
Fisheries Statistics of the Philippines. Manila: BFAR.
Hermes, R. et al. 2004. Overexploitation in the Visayan Sea: Designing a project solution, p. 312-317. In DA-BFR (Department of Agriculture-Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources). In Turbulent seas: The status of Philippine marine fisheries. Coastal Resource Management Project, Cebu City, Philippines. 378p.
Philippine Fisheries Profile. Manila: BFAR.
"Philippine Visayan Sea Close to Depletion",The Catch from News Reports from Around the World. STREAM Media Monitoring Report, June 2004, p.6



Dr. Rodolfo B. Baldevarona:
The Underdog Filipino Fisheries Scientist
By
Melchor F. Cichon
December 8, 2007
One of the most interesting figures in the University of the Philippines  Visayas is Dr. Rodolfo B. Baldevarona.
Each time he opens his mouth, many people make different faces.
Some are happy, but the majority of his colleagues are not. In the shuttle bus, everybody is familiar with his laughter.
And his laughter is contagious. To some.
What makes him interesting?
"I have a foresight, but some people do not agree with my ideas. And since I am alone, my suggestions are always turned down by the majority rule. No problem."
Not only foresight, but he has a lot of bright ideas if only one has the ear to listen to him.
There were several occasions where he had clashed with his colleagues on university policies but this aspect of his life requires a longer paper.
And if you happen to be one of his students, better attend regularly to his class because you will surely miss a lot of insights that will greatly benefit your professional career, particularly in fish physiology for he is one of the few Filipino experts on the subject in the Philippines today.
I will focus on his life as a fisheries scientist.
Dr. Baldevarona has been a faculty member of the University of the Philippines Visayas since 1972.
Born from poor parents, Prof. Baldevarona graduated Valedictorian at Culasi Elementary School, Culasi, Ajuy, Iloilo, and graduated First Honors and Corp Commander in 1965 at Victorino Salcedo High School at Sara, Iloilo. From then he took up B.S. Education, majoring in Mathematics-Chemistry with Physics at UP College Iloilo, Iloilo City in 1969, and became the Corp Commander of UP Vanguard, Inc., UP College Iloilo (UPCI), in Iloilo City (now the University of the Philippines in the Visayas.
After graduation from college, he taught at Luca Barrio High School in 1969-70, then he transferred to Victorino Salcedo High School, his alma mater, in 1970. He stayed there until 1972 when he was hired as an Instructor at UP College Iloilo. After 7 years, he was promoted to Instructor IV.
While teaching at University of the Philippines College Iloilo (UPCI), now the UP Visayas, he took up units in Master in Public Administration and in Master in Arts Teaching majoring in physics. But then he switched to fisheries when there was a move to create the UPV with the College of Fisheries as its flagship college.
After his master’s degree in fisheries, he was appointed as Assistant College Secretary of the UPV College of Fisheries.
His other administrative works include the following: Philippine Army Active Duty, Cebu City 1971-72; Head, DYD/CAT, UPCI High School, 1974-75; Commandant, CAT I, UPCI High School, 1979-80; Asst. College Secretary UP in the Visayas-College of Fisheries Program Iloilo (UPV-CFPI) 1981-1983; Technical Assistant UPV, Food System Development Program 1988-89; OIC UPV Office of research Coordination 1988-89; director, UPV ORC 1989-92; OIC Vice- chancellor for Administration, 9/1/89-12/31/89; OIC UPV security Force 9/1/89-04/30/90 and Station Head, BAC, Leganes, 1/1/99-12/31/99.
When his field of study switched to fisheries, he has no other recourse but to focus on this discipline, more particularly on mangrove reforestation.
And his knowledge on chemistry and physics came as a big help as fisheries deals much on these two sciences. Both chemistry and physics can be applied in marine sciences.
In 1987, he received his PhD degree from the University of South Carolina, USA.
In 2005, he ran for chancellor of the University of the Philippines Visayas together with Dr. Glenn Aguilar, his fellow Ilonggo and a colleague at the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, UPV.
Unfortunately, he was not chosen.
Dr. Aguilar was selected as the new UPV Chancellor, vice Dr. Ida Siason.
Dr. Baldevarona honorably accepted his defeat.
As a fisheries scientist, Dr. Baldevarona has conducted some researches related to fisheries. The results of these can be seen in some of his publications:
Baldevarona, RB. 1979. Basic flow of phosphorus in brackishwater fishponds. MS thesis. Submitted to the Graduate Faculty of the University of the Philippines System in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Fisheries (major in aquaculture). 78 leaves.
Baldevarona, R,B. 1983. Quantitative methods of applying organic matter in fishponds. Danyag, UP in the Visayas 2(1):102-109.
Baldevarona, RB. 1987. Effects of feeding and stocking density on growth and survival of spot, Leiostomius xanthurus Lacepede. PhD. Dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Marine Science Program, University of South Carolina. 117 leaves.
Baldevarona, RB and JM Dean. 1988. Abundance estimate and population structure of spot, Leiostomus xanthurus Lacepede. Kinaalam, UP in the Visayas 2(1):50-62.
Secor, D., JM Dean and RB Baldevarona. 1989. Comparison of otolith and somatic growth in larval and juvenile fishes based on otolith length/fish length relationship. Rapp.p.v.Reun. Cons. Int. Explor. Mer. 191:431-438
Baldevarona, RB. 1990. Chemistry in aquaculture. I. Soil quality management. Kinaalam, UP in the Visayas 3(1):139-146.
Baldevarona, RB and CG Rendon. 1991. Toxic effects of selected plants for pest and predators control in prawn ponds. Philippine Technology Journal 16(4):3-24.
Baldevarona, RB. 1992. The role of mangrove in the Philippine coastal environment. Mangrove Productivity. DOST-PCARRD. 127:25-33.
Baldevarona, RB. 1992. Reforestation and management of mangrove swamp in Taklong island, Guimaras. Mangrove Productivity 127:107-114.
Tambasen-Cheong, MV, J. Tan-Fermin, LM Garcia and RB Baldevarona. 1995. Milt-egg ration in artificial fertilization of the Asian freshwater catfish Clarias macrocephalus, injected salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue and domperidone. Aquatic Living Resources 8:303-307.
La Sara, JA Ingles, RB Baldevarona, RO Aguilar, LV Laureta and S Watanabe. 2002. Reproductive biology of mud crab, Scylla serrata in Lawelle Bay, Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia. JSPS-DGHE International Seminar. Crustacean Fisheries, pp. 88-95.
This year,  2007, is his luckiest year in his career as a scientist.
His two papers were published in two prestigious journals making him a dual recipient of the International Publication Awards 2007 given by the University of the Philippines:
"The Natural Diet of the Mud Crab (Scylla serrata) in Lawele Bay, Southeast Sulawasi, Indonesia, " published in The Philippine Agricultural Scientist 90 (1):6-14, 2007, and the
"Abundance and distribution Patterns of Scylla spp. in the Lawele Bay, Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesian," published in Asian Fisheries Science 19:331-347, 2006.
Now, can we still say that he is an underdog fisheries scientist?




Dr. Riza O. Aguilar: Fish Biochemist
By
Melchor F. Cichon



Dr. Riza O Aguilar was born in 1960.
A professor at the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, U.P. Visayas, Miag-ao, Iloilo, Dr. Aguilar holds the degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Tokyo University of Fisheries.
An expert on fish biochemistry, Dr. Aguilar has conducted researches in Tokyo, Japan, and in the Philippines.
Some of her published works are as follows:
Aguilar, R. O and Ohno, A. 1999. Behavior of some hatchery-reared finfish larvae. Presented in World Aquaculture ’99, Sydney Convention & Exhibition Centre, Sydney, Australia. 27 April-2 May 1999.
Aguilar, R. O., Kohno, H., Ohno, A., Moteki, M., and Taki, Y. March 1995. Development of grouper, Epinephelus coioides, larvae during changeover of energy sources. Journal of Tokyo University of Fisheries 82(1): 103-108.
Aguilar, R. O. 1996. Osteological development of the feeding apparatus in early stage larvae of seabass, Lates calcarifer. Ichthyological research.
Aguilar, R. O. and Ohno, A. Nov. 2002. Observations on the feeding ecology and behavior of newly-hatched grouper, Epinephelus coioides, larvae. Fisheries Science 68(Supplemnt 1):1000-1001.
Aguilar, R. O. Development of structures concerned with feeding in the rabbitfish larvae, siganus guttatus, Ichthyological Research.
Aguilar, R. O., Kohno, H., Ohno, A., Moteki, M. and Taki, Y.  1997. The development of grouper, Epinephelus coioides, larvae during changeover of energy sources. Paper presented in World Aquaculture ’97, Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, Washington, U.S.A.
Urmaza, Elizabeth B. and Aguilar, Riza O. Dec 1999. Effect of increasing salinity regimes on the survival of crossbred tilapia progenies intended for saline environment. UPV Journal of Natural Sciences 4(2):73-91.

Dr. Aguilar was involved in the project titled “Development of Hatchery Techniques for the Oriental Angelwing, Pholas orientalis," in collaboration with Dr. Liberato Laureta, also a professor of the UPV College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences-Institute of Aquaculture (CFOS-IA).
The project "specifically aims to determine the fecundity (reproductiveness) of different sizes of adult diwal; the effects of different temperature, salinity, types, and amount of food items on the growth and survival of larvae and spats; and the best size of seedlings for dispersal that will end the hatchery process."

Angelwing is locally known as diwal and one of the most important marine bivalves in the Philippines
She is married to Dr. Glenn D. Aguilar, the former Chancellor, UP Visayas, Miag-ao, Iloilo.

Source: New project aims to save prized shellfish, http://beta.mb.com.ph/articles/new-project-aims-save-prized-shellfish
Retrieved: April 9, 2009




Teodoro U. Abalos: An Aquaculture Engineer*
by
Melchor F. Cichon
December 3, 2007

An expert in aquaculture engineering, the young Teodoro was born on December 1, 1949, and became a Professor at the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of the Philippines Visayas, Miag-ao, Iloilo.

He took his Master of Science in Aquaculture Engineering at the University of Sterling, Scotland, United Kingdom.  In 1979, he conducted a study on the phytoplankton ecosystem in Lake Lido, West Java, Indonesia. His other researches focused on aquaculture engineering design of freshwater recirculating system for the culture of tilapia  and on the culture and hatchery of tilapia.

*I have limited information about Prof. Abalos.




Dr. Emilia Tobias-Quinitio:  Shrimp and Mud Crab Expert
By Melchor F. Cichon
January 12, 2007

Who says that men are better scientists than women?
Wait until you see Dr. Emilia Tobias-Quinitio.
She is an epitome of women fisheries scientists in the country.
At present Dr. Emilia Tobias Quinitio works as scientist and Program Leader of Shrimp and Crab Domestication at the Aquaculture Department (AQD) of the Southeast Asia Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC) in Tigbauan, Iloilo, where her husband, Dr. Gerald Quinitio, used to work also as a scientist before he transferred to the University of the Philippines -College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences (UPV-CFOS in Miag-ao, Iloilo. Gerry is also a product of UPV-CFOS.
Although Dr. Quinitio was born in Ilocos Sur on September 11, 1953, she was raised and educated in Manila. She took her high school at Saint Rita College in Manila and finished her Bachelor of Science in Fisheries, major in Inland Fisheries, at the UP College of Fisheries in Diliman, Quezon City, now the UPV-CFOS in March 1976. Two months after, she was employed at SEAFDEC/AQD and assigned under the Shrimp Hatchery Project.
Then came the turning point in her career.
She was given a scholarship by the Philippine Council for Agricultural Research  (PCARR), what is now known as the Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD) for an M.Sc.degree at the College of Fisheries, UPV, graduating in 1980. Her thesis is entitled:"Growth, Survival and Macronutrient Composition of Peneaus monodon Fabricius Larvae Fed with Chaetoceros calcitrans and Tetraselmis chuii”.
Ten years after that, she was awarded another scholarship. This time from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science for the Doctor of Fisheries Science at the Faculty of Fisheries, Hokkaido University, Hakodate, Japan . Her dissertation is entitled: "Physiological Studies on the Reproduction of Shrimps: Hormonal Regulation during Vitellogenesis."
With her solid academic background and work experience, Dr. Quinitio continued to conduct research works on crustaceans. These can be seen in her publications, both in local and international journals, as follows:
Tobias-Quinitio, E. and C.T. Villegas. 1982. Growth, survival and macronutrient composition of Penaeus monodon Fabricius larvae fed with Chaetoceros calcitrans and Tetraselmis chuii. Aquaculture 29:243-260.
Quinitio, E.T., D. de la Peña, and F.P. Pascual. 1983. The use of substitute feeds in larval rearing of Penaeus monodon. Rogers G.L., Day R., Lim A., eds. Proc. First Int’l Conf. of Warm Water Aquaculture Crustaceans, Feb 9-11, 1983, BYU, Hawaii, 337-342.
Quinitio E.T. and E. Reyes. 1983. The effect of different feed combinations using chicken egg yolk in Penaeus monodon. Rogers G.L., Day R., Lim A., eds. Proc. First Int’l Conf. of Warm Water Aquaculture Crustaceans, Feb 9-11, 1983, BYU, Hawaii, 333-336.
Quinitio, E.T., P. Gabasa, F. Suñaz, E. Reyes and D. de la Peña. 1984. Prawn hatchery Design and Operation. SEAFDEC/AQD Ext. Manual No. 9. 47 pp.
Vogt, G.,V. Storch, E.T. Quinitio and F.P. Pascual. 1985. Midgut gland as monitor organ for the nutritional value of diets in Penaeus monodon (Decapoda). Aquaculture 58:1-12.
Vogt, G., E.T. Quinitio and F.P. Pascual. 1986. Leucaena leucocephala leaves in formulated feed for Penaeus monodon: A concrete example of the application of histology in nutrition research. Aquaculture 59:209-234.
Vogt, G., E.T. Quinitio and F.P. Pascual. 1989. Interaction of the midgut gland and the ovary in the vitellogenesis and consequences for the breeding success: a comparison of unablated and ablated spawners of Penaeus monodon. De Pauw N., Jaspers E., Ackefors H., Wilkins N, eds. Aquaculture – A Biotechnology in Progress: Bredene, Belgium: European Aquaculture Society 581-592.
Quinitio, E.T., A. Hara, K. Yamauchi, T. Mizushima and A. Fuji. 1989. Identification and characterization of vitellin in a hermaphrodite shrimp, Pandalus kessleri. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology 94:445-452.
Quinitio E.T., A. Hara, K. Yamauchi, and A. Fuji. 1990. Isolation and characterization of vitellin from the ovary of Penaeus monodon. Invertebrate Reproduction and Development 17:221-227.
Quinitio E.T., K. Yamauchi, A. Hara, and A. Fuji. 1991. Profiles of progesterone and estradiol-like substances in the hemolymph of female Pandalus kessleri during an annual reproductive cycle. General Comparative Endocrinology 81:343-348.
Vogt, G. and E.T. Quinitio. 1991. Fate and effects of water-borne heavy metals in Penaeus monodon. De Pauw N., Joyce J. eds. European Aquaculture Soc. Special Publications No. 14, 320-321.
Estepa, F.P., E.T. Quinitio and E.L. Borlongan. 1991. Prawn hatchery Operations. SEAFDEC Aquaculture Extension Manual No. 19. 44 pp.
Quinitio, E.T., F.. Estepa and E. Coniza. 1991. Completion of the life cycle of Penaeus japonicus in the Philippines. Philippine Journal of Science 120:155-158.
Quinitio, E.T. and O.M. Millamena. 1992. Ovarian changes and female-specific protein levels during sexual maturation of the white shrimp Penaeus indicus. Israeli Journal of Aquacult.ure-Bamidgeh 44:7-12.
Quinitio, E.T., R. Caballero and L. Gustilo. 1993. Ovarian development in relation to changes in the external genitalia in captive Penaeus monodon. Aquaculture 114:71-81.
Vogt, G. and E.T. Quinitio. 1994. Accumulation and excretion of metal granules in the prawn, Penaeus monodon, exposed to water-borne copper, lead, iron and calcium. Aquatic Toxicology 28(3-4):223-242.
Quinitio, E.T., K. Yamauchi and A. Hara. 1994. Changes in the steroid hormone and vitellogenin levels during the gametogenic cycle of the giant tiger shrimp, Penaeus monodon. Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology 109C:21-26.
Quinitio, E.T., F.P. Estepa and O.M. Millamena. 1996. Reproductive performance of captive Penaeus monodon fed various sources of carotenoids. Santiago C.B., Coloso R.M., Millamena O.M. and Borlongan I., eds. Proceedings of the National Seminar-Workshop on Fish Nutrition and Feeds, 1-2 June 1994, SEAFDEC/AQD, Iloilo, Philippines. Pp 74-82.
Quinitio, E.T., F.P. Estepa and V. Alava. 1999. Development of hatchery techniques for the mud crab Scylla serrata. 1. Comparison of feeding schemes. Proceedings of the Mud Crab Scientific Forum, 20-24 April 1997, Darwin, Northern, Territory, Australia. ACIAR Proceedings No. 78.
Parado-Estepa, F.D. and E.T. Quinitio. 1999. Larval survival and megalopae production of Scylla sp. at different salinities. In: Proceedings of the Mud Crab Scientific Forum, 20-24 April 1997, Darwin, Northern, Territory, Australia. ACIAR Proceedings No. 78. 174-177.
Millamena, O.M. and E.T. Quinitio. 1999. Reproductive performance of pond-sourced Scylla serrata fed various broodstock diets. In: Proceedings of the Mud Crab Scientific Forum, 20-24 April 1997, Darwin, Northern, Territory, Australia. ACIAR Proceedings No. 78. 114-118.
Millamena, O.M. and E.T. Quinitio. 2000. The effects of diets on the reproductive performance of eyestalk ablated and intact mud crab Scylla serrata. Aquaculture 181:81-90.
Quinitio, E.T. and F.D. Parado-Estepa. 2000. Transport of Scylla serrata megalopae at various densities and durations. Aquaculture 185:63-71.
Honculada-Primavera, J. and E.T. Quinitio. 2000. Runt-deformity syndrome in cultured giant tiger prawn Penaeus monodon. Journal of Crustacean Biology 20(24):796-802.
Quinitio, E.T., F.D. Parado-Estepa, O.M. Millamena and E.M. Rodriguez. 2001. Seed production of mud crab Scylla serrata. In: Proceedings of the International Forum on the Culture of Portunid Crabs. Millamena O.M, Quinitio E.T and Blackshaw A. eds. 1-4 December 1998. Asian Fisheries Science 14(2):161-174.
Quinitio, E.T. and F.D. Parado-Estepa. 2001. Simulated transport of Scylla serrata zoeae at various loading densities. In: Proceedings of the International Forum on the Culture of Portunid Crabs. Millamena O.M, Quinitio E.T and Blackshaw A. eds. 1-4 December 1998. Asian Fisheries Science 14(2):225-230.
Rodriguez, E.M., E.T. Quinitio, F.D. Parado-Estepa and O.M. Millamena. 2001. Culture of Scylla serrata megalops in brackishwater ponds. In: Proceedings of the International Forum on the Culture of Portunid Crabs. Millamena O.M, Quinitio E.T and Blackshaw A. eds. 1-4 December 1998. Asian Fisheries Science 14(2):185-190.
Lavilla-Pitogo, C.R., H.S. Marcial, S.A.G. Pedrajas, E.T. Quinitio, and O.M. Millamena. 2001. Problems associated with tank-held mud crabs (Scylla spp) In: Proceedings of the International Forum on the Culture of Portunid Crabs. Millamena O.M, Quinitio E.T and Blackshaw A. eds. 1-4 December 1998. Asian Fisheries Science 14(2):217-224.
Quinitio, E.T. and F.D. Parado-Estepa. 2003. Biology and Hatchery of Mud Crabs Scylla spp. Aquaculture Extension Manual No. 34. SEAFDEC/AQD, Iloilo, Philippines. 32pp.
Quinitio, E.T. 2003. Mud crab hatchery and grow-out status in the Philippines. In: Proceedings of the ACIAR Crab Aquaculture Scoping Study and Workshop. G. Allan and D. Fielder eds. 28-29 April 2003, Bribie, Island, Queensland, Australia. P. 53-56.
Okuzawa, K. J. Lebata, S.M.A. Buen-Ursua and E.T. Quinitio. 2006. The SEAFDEC/AQD Experience in Stock Enhancement. In: Proceedings of the Regional Technical Consultation on Stock Enhancement for Threatened Species of International Concern. 13-15 July 2005.
Primavera, J.H., Quinitio, E.T. and Eguia, M.R.R. eds. SEAFDEC/AQD and Government of Japan Trust Fund. p.17-26.
Quinitio, E.T. J. de Pedro and F.P. Estepa. 2007. Ovarian Maturation Stages of the Mud Crab Scylla serrata. Aquaculture Research (in press)
Because of her expertise, Dr. Quinitio has been invited to serve as Resource Speaker/Lecturer on Crab /Shrimp Biology and Reproductive Physiology, Breeding and Culture (from hatchery to grow-out ponds), and related topics in local and international training courses, workshops, conferences and fisheries caravan. She also served as adviser, examiner (critic) and reviewer of Ph.D and MSc students from the U.P.V (Philippines), James Cook University (Australia), University of Wales in Bangor, (U.K.) and Rhodes University, Grahamstown (South Africa). She also reviews research proposals for International Foundation for Science (Sweden).
Dr. Quinitio is not only a technical writer, she also has served as reviewer of manuscripts for journals like Aquaculture, Aquaculture Research, Asian Fisheries, Philippine Journal of Science, and others.

Three of the books she has co-edited are:
Quinitio E.T. and J.H. Primavera (Guest editors). 1998. Proceedings of the Second International Conference on the Culture of Penaeid Prawns and Shrimps. Aquaculture Vol. 164.
Millamena O.M., Quinitio E.T. and Blackshaw, A. 2001. Proceedings of the International Forum on the Culture of Portunid Crabs. Asian Fisheries Science. Vol. 14 No. 2.
Primavera, J.H., Quinitio E.T. and Eguia M.R.R. 2006. Proceedings of the Regional Technical Consultation in Stock Enhancement for the Threatened Species of International Concern. 13-15 July 2005, Iloilo City, Philippines. SEAFDEC/AQD and Government of Japan Thrust Fund. 149 pp.

Two of her research works were given awards. These are the best published research paper award given by the Bureau of Agriculture Research, Department of Agriculture, Philippines for the paper entitled: Seed Production of Mud Crab Scylla serrata by Emilia T. Quinitio et al., 4 October 2001, and National Research and Development Award given by the Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture, Philippines, for the paper entitled: Reproductive Performance of the Mud Crab Scylla serrata Fed Dietary Lipids by Quinitio et al., 5 October 2005.
She has been actively involved in the dissemination of crab culture (hatchery, nursery and grow-out technology) to stakeholders not only in the country but also in some Asian countries towards a more sustainable crab industry.


Dr. Gerald F. Quinitio: A Filipino Fisheries Scientist
By
Melchor F. Cichon
December 1, 2006

Among the Filipino fisheries scientists today, Dr. Gerald F. Quinitio belongs to the first level.
He was formerly employed as a scientist at SEAFDEC/AQD, Tigbauan, Iloilo, but now he works as an assistant professor at the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences (CFOS), University of the Philippines in the Visayas, Miag-ao, Iloilo.
His appointment as a faculty at CFOS augmented the list of distinguished fisheries scholars and scientists of the College. He joins the ranks of Drs. Rogelio O. Juliano, Augusto Serrano, and Romeo Fortes, among others.
Dr. Quinitio is a fisheries scientist par excellence. He is not only known in the Philippines but also abroad for his numerous researches and published works on fisheries.
He considers his works on the physiology of milkfish and grouper as his most significant contributions to fisheries science.
Here are some of his notable researches on grouper and milkfish:
1. Optimization of reproductive performance and egg production of Epinephelus coioides by sex ratio manipulation
2. Effect of different fat sources on the egg quality of Epinephelus suillus
3. Broodstock development of Epinephelus sp.
4. Induced sex control in juvenile grouper, Epinephelus sp.
5. Development of the digestive system of Epinephelus coioides larvae
6. Salinity and temperature adaptation in Epinephelus coioides larvae and juveniles
7. Effect of stocking density and cage size on the growth of juvenile milkfish
8. Development of an efficient method of collecting, handling and transport of newly fertilized milkfish eggs
9. Effect of feeding levels and frequency on growth of milkfish broodstock
From his research work, he authored and co-authored 28 articles which were published locally and internationally. Some of these include the following: (Please see his complete list of publications at the end of this article)
1. Juario, J.V., M. Natividad, G. Quinitio and J. Banno. 1979. Experiments on the induced spawning and larval rearing of the milkfish, Chanos chanos (Forsskal) in 1979. SEAFDEC/AQD Qrtly. Res. Rpt., 3. 1-3.
2. Quinitio, G.F., J.D. Toledo, A.T. Duller and D.M. Reyes, Jr. 1991. Survival of yolk-sac larvae of grouper (Epinephelus suillus) under simulated transport conditions. p. 326-327 In P. Lavens, P. Sorgeloos, E. Jasper and F. Ollevier (eds.). Larvi '91 - Fish and Crustacean Larviculture Symposium. European Society, Special Publ. 15, Gent, Belgium.
3. Quinitio, G.F., A. Goto and H. Takahashi. 1992. A comparison of the annual changes in testicular activity and serum androgen levels between the early and delayed maturing groups of male Cottus hangiongensis. Env. Biol. Fish. 34: 119-126.
4. Quinitio, G.F., R.M. Coloso, N.B. Caberoy, J.D. Toledo and D.M. Reyes, Jr. 1996. Egg quality of grouper Epinephelus coioides fed different fatty acid sources, p. 103-107. In D. MacKinlay and M. Eldridge (eds.). The fish egg: Its biology and culture. Proceedings of the International Congress on the Biology of Fishes. 14-18 July 1996. San Francisco State University. 191 p.
5. Quinitio, G.F., N.B. Caberoy and D.M. Reyes, Jr. 1997. Induction of sex change in female Epinephelus coioides by social control. Isr. J. Aqua. - Bamidgeh 49: 77-83.
6. Caberoy, N.B. and G.F. Quinitio. 2000. Changes in Na+,K+-ATPase activity and gill chloride cell morphology in the grouper Epinephelus coioides larvae and juveniles in response to salinity and temperature. Fish Physiol. Biochem. 23: 83-94.
7. Quinitio, G.F., J.D. Tan-Fermin and A. Nagai. 2001. Possible application of mibolerone for induced sex inversion of grouper Epinephelus coioides. Fisheries Sci. 67: 232-237.
8. Toledo, J.D., N.B. Caberoy and G.F. Quinitio. 2004. Environmental factors affecting embryonic development hatching and survival of early stage larvae of the grouper (Epinephelus coioides). p. 10-16. In M.A. Rimmer, S. McBride and K.C. Williams (eds.). Advances in Grouper Aquaculture. Canberra. ACIAR Monograph No. 110. 137 p.
9. Quinitio, G.F., A.C. Sa-an, J.D Toledo and J.D. Tan-Fermin. 2004. Localization of enzymes in the digestive system during early development of the grouper Epinephelus coioides. p 30-34. In M.A. Rimmer, S. McBride and K.C. Williams (eds.). Advances in Grouper Aquaculture. Canberra. ACIAR Monograph No. 110. 137 p.
10. Alava, V.R., F.M.P Priolo, J.D. Toledo, J.C. Rodriguez, G.F. Quinitio, A.C. Sa-an, M.R. de la Peña and R.C. Caturao. 2004. Lipid Nutrition studies on grouper (Epinephelus coioides) Larvae. p. 47-52. In M.A. Rimmer, S. McBride and K.C. Williams (eds.). Advances in Grouper Aquaculture. Canberra. ACIAR Monograph No. 110. 137 p.
Because of his expertise, Dr. Quinitio has been tapped as thesis adviser/panel member/critic to graduate and undergraduate students.
Here are some of the students whom he has helped in their theses:
As co-adviser:
Nora B. Caberoy, Osmoregulation in Grouper Epinephelus coioides (Hamilton) Larvae and Juveniles. (M.S., graduated March 1999)
Analyn C. Sa-an, Development of the Digestive System of Rabbitfish Siganus, guttatus (Bloch): Histology and Histochemistry, (M.S.,graduated March 2004)
Aileeen B. Bofill, Embryonic Development and Hatching Rate of grouper, Epinephelus suillus Eggs Incubated at Different Stocking, Densities, (B.S., graduated April 1992)
As a Panel Member:
Grace H. Garcia, Milt Response of the Sea Bass Lates calcarifer (Bloch) to Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Analogue and 17Methyltestosterone, (M.S, graduated April 1992)
As a Critic:
Melvin Z. Mangawil, Effect of Feeding Frequency on the Growth , Survival and Net Yield of Sea Bass (reared in Floating Net Cages, (M.S., graduated November 1990)
His expertise was not only used in SEAFDEC/AQD and in the academe, but also outside of these two institutions.
He served as Research Assistant at the Center for Development Studies, Inc., Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines, Nov 1975-Dec 1975. He also worked as a Technical Assistant at the Department of Natural Resources, Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines, Jan 1976-Apr 1976. At the same time, he worked as a Research Assistant at the Synergistic Consultants Inc., Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines, Feb 1976-Apr 1976. And in 1999, he served as a Consultant at GAINEX Mid-term Evaluation Project (GAINEX 99), Gaia South Inc.-Environmental Consultants, 7/F Montepino Bldg., Gamboa cor. Adelantado Sts., Legaspi Village, Makati City, Philippines, Jul-Sep 1999
Dr. Quinitio is not only expert in fisheries but he is also good in Niponggo. In fact, he has been hired by the West Visayas State University and by the University of the Philippine in the Visayas to teach basic Japanese language. Until now he serves as a private tutor for basic Japanese language.
Dr. Quinitio was born in Manila on June 25, 1954. His parents are Simeon H. Quinitio, Jr. and Luz M. Fontelera. He took his high school at Don Bosco Technical Institute, Makati, Rizal. This encouraged him to take up engineering degree at UP. Unfortunately, he did not pass the UPCAT.
Let me quote him:
"My taking up fisheries was just an accident. To be frank, I wasn't able to pass the UPCAT but I wanted to study in UP. The real course I wanted to take up was electrical engineering which is closest to electronics at that time. Electronics was my vocational course in high school at Don Bosco Technical Institute in Makati.
"I heard that there were diploma courses at UP that didn't require UPCAT. It was music, fine arts and fisheries. Since the former two courses were not close to my heart, I decided to take up Diploma in Fisheries. The home town (Infanta, Pangasinan) of my parents is an agricultural and fishing village so whenever we go home during summer vacation me, my siblings and cousins always loved swimming and diving in the sea. That triggered me to take up fisheries to get into UP and then shift to engineering when I reach the required units and grades. However, when I could already transfer after 1 year, I decided to go on with fisheries because I've learned to like the course."
But he must have been influenced by his father, Simeon H. Quinitio, Jr. who is a graduate of the Philippine Institute of Fisheries Technology (PIFT), the forerunner of the present UPV-CFOS.
So he stayed on until he received his BS Fisheries, majoring in marine fisheries.
Two years after graduation, Gerry, as he is fondly called by his colleagues, got employed as a Fisheries Technician, in a Fish Hatchery Project, at the SEAFDEC/AQD in Tigbauan, Iloilo in June 1978. Through hard work, he was promoted in July 1981 as a Research Associate in the same project.
By this time, Gerry has already finished his Master in Fisheries, major in Aquaculture at UPV-CFOS through a scholarship grant from Philippine Council for Agriculture, Forestry, and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCARRD).
This was followed by a two-year, 1984-1986, scholarship grant from the Ministry of Japanese Ministry of Education Scholarship (Monbusho) for Japanese Language (6 months.) at Osaka University of Foreign Studies and Research Studentship at Kochi University. After which he took his Doctor of Fisheries Science at Hokkaido University, Hakodate, Hokkaido, Japan, with his thesis entitled: "Studies on the Functional Morphology of the Testis in Two Species of Freshwater Sculpins” in 1989.
While working at SEAFDEC/AQD, where his wife, Dr. Emilia Tobias-Quinitio, also works, Gerry received a lot of training, grants and projects on the various aspects of fisheries. From these activities, he produced more than twenty scientific papers and pamphlets.
With these accomplishments, Dr. Quinitio, was promoted as scientist by SEAFDEC/AQD, one of the very few personnel of SEAFDEC/AQD to have been designated as such.
But his employment at SEAFDEC/AQD was suddenly cut off when a change was undertaken by the management of this research institution.
Knowing that he still has a lot of things to contribute for the development of fisheries in the country, Dr. Quinitio decided to work at the CFOS, his alma mater.
He said that " Researchers in fisheries still have a lot of work to do. The world population is increasing and there is a need to increase aquatic food production to cope-up with the demand but without destroying our environment. Therefore fisheries research will definitely play a big role for such a big challenge."
He continues:
"I decided to continue working on fisheries since I learned while working in this field that it is very important that we should have good source of protein in our diet. Fisheries, I believe can answer this need. Therefore we should take care of our aquatic resources and develop technology for propagating them. I hope that by doing research and teaching students, I could some how help towards this goal."
And this is also a challenge not only to their “child” , Karla Baltazar, but to all of us.

****
Here is his list of publications as of August 2006
Edited Book and Proceeding:

Lacanilao, F., R.M. Coloso andG. F. Quinitio (Eds.). 1994. Proceedings of the Seminar-Workshop on Aquaculture Development in Southeast Asia and Prospects for Seafarming and Searanching. 19-23 Aug. 1991, Iloilo City, Philippines. 159 p.
Marte, C.L., G. F. Quinitio and A.C. Emata (Eds.). 1996. Breeding and seed production of cultured finfishes in the Philippines. 4-5 May 1993. SEAFDEC/AQD, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines. 182 p.
Journal and other Publications:
Juario, J.V., M. Natividad, G. F. Quinitio and J. Banno. 1979. Experiments on the induced spawning and larval rearing of the milkfish, Chanos chanos (Forsskal) in 1979. SEAFDEC/AQD Qrtly. Res. Rpt., 3. 1-3.
Lijauco, M., J. Juario, D. Baliao, E. Griño and G. F. Quinitio. 1979. Milkfish culture in brackishwater ponds. SEAFDEC/AQD, Tigbauan, Iloilo. Ext. manual 4. 17 pp.
Quinitio, G.F. and G. Kawamura. 1980. A comparison between the catching efficiency of two milkfish fry collecting gears and their respective modifications. SEAFDEC/AQD Qrtly. Res. Rpt., 4. 7-10.
Juario, J.V., G. F. Quinitio, J.E. Banno and M. Natividad. 1980. Effects of exogenous hormone injections on milt consistency in newly caught, wild milkfish. Kalikasan, Philipp. J. Biol. 9. 321-326.
Quinitio, G.F. and J.V. Juario.1980. Effect of various salinity levels and stock manipulation methods on the survival of milkfish fry (Chanos chanos) during storage. Fish. Res. J. Philipp. 5. 11-21.
Baticados, M.C.L. and G. F. Quinitio. 1984. Occurrence and pathology of an Amyloodinium-like protozoan parasite on gills of grey mullet, Mugil cephalus. Helgolander Meeresunters. 37. 595-601.
Marte, C.L., G. F. Quinitio, L.M.B. Garcia and F.J. Lacanilao. 1984. A Guide to the establishment and maintenance of milkfish broodstock. SEAFDEC/AQD-IDRC Tech. Rpt. 11. 36 pp.
Marte, C.L., J. Toledo, G. F. Quinitio and A. Castillo. 1986. Collection of naturally-spawned milkfish eggs in floating cages, p. 671-674. In J.L. Maclean, L.B. Dizon and L.V. Hosillos (eds.) The First Asian Fisheries Forum. Asian Fisheries Society, Manila, Philippines.
Quinitio, G.F., H. Takahashi and A. Goto. 1988. Annual changes in the testicular activity of the river sculpin, Cottus hangiongensis Mori, with emphasis on the occurrence of aberrant spermatids during spermatogenesis. J. Fish Biol. 33. 871-878.
Quinitio, G. F., A. Takemura and A. Goto. 1989. Ovarian development and changes in the vitellogenin levels in the river sculpin, Cottus hangiongensis, during an annual reproductive cycle. Bull. Fac. Fish. Hokkaido Univ. 40. 246-253.
Quinitio, G.F., J.D. Toledo, A.T. Duller and D.M. Reyes, Jr. 1991. Survival of yolk-sac larvae of grouper (Epinephelus suillus) under simulated transport conditions. p. 326-327 In P. Lavens, P. Sorgeloos, E. Jasper and F. Ollevier (eds.). Larvi '91 - Fish and Crustacean Larviculture Symposium. European Society, Special Publ. 15, Gent, Belgium.
Quinitio, G.F. and J.D. Toledo. 1991. Mariculture techniques for Epinephelus sp. in the Philippines, p. 94-106. In R.D. Guerrero III and M.P. Garcia, Jr. (eds.) Advances in finfish and shellfish mariculture. Proceedings of the First Philippine-French Technical Workshop on Advances in Finfish and Shellfish Mariculture, PCAMRD, Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines, 24-26 Oct. 1990. Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines. 172 p
Quinitio, G.F., A. Goto and H. Takahashi. 1992. A comparison of the annual changes in testicular activity and serum androgen levels between the early and delayed maturing groups of male Cottus hangiongensis. Env. Biol. Fish. 34: 119-126.
Quinitio, G.F. and H. Takahashi. 1992 An ultrastructural study on the occurrence of aberrant spermatids in the testis of the river sculpin, Cottus hangiongensis. Japan. J. Ichthyol. 39: 235-241.
Quinitio, G.F. and H. Takahashi. 1994. Occurrence of aberrant spermatids in the freshwater sculpin, Cottus nozawae Snyder. In L.M. Chou, A.D. Munro, T.J. Lam, T.W. Chen, L.K.K Cheong, J.K. Ding, K.K. Hooi, H.W. Khoo, V.P.E. Phang, K.F. Shim, C.H. Tan (eds.). Third Asian Fisheries Forum. Asian Fisheries Society, Manila, Philippines: 802-805.
Quinitio, G.F., R.M. Coloso, N.B. Caberoy, J.D. Toledo and D.M. Reyes, Jr. 1996. Egg quality of grouper Epinephelus coioides fed different fatty acid sources, p. 103-107. In D. MacKinlay and M. Eldridge (eds.). The fish egg: Its biology and culture. Proceedings of the International Congress on the Biology of Fishes. 14-18 July 1996. San Francisco State University. 191 p.
Quinitio, G.F. and M.N. Duray. 1996. Review of SEAFDEC/AQD finfish seed production research. Proceedings of the National Seminar-Workshop on Breeding and Seed Production of Cultured Finfishes in the Philippines. 4-5 May 1993. SEAFDEC/AQD, Tigbauan, Iloilo, Philippines: 119-131.
Quinitio, G.F., N.B. Caberoy and D.M. Reyes, Jr. 1997. Induction of sex change in female Epinephelus coioides by social control. Isr. J. Aqua. - Bamidgeh 49: 77-83.
Caberoy, N.B. and G. F. Quinitio. 1998. Sensitivity of grouper Epinephelus coioides eggs to handling stress at different stages of embryonic development. Isr. J. Aqua. – Bamidgeh 50: 167-173.
Quinitio, G. 1999. The status of seed production of grouper and other coral reef fishes in the Philippines, p 155-162. In A.S. Cabanban and M. Phillips (eds.). Aquculture of Coral Reef Fishes. Proceedings of the Workshop on Aquaculture of Coral Reef Fisheries. Kota Kinabalu, Sabah Malaysia. 6-10 Dec. 1996. Institute for Development Studies (Sabah). 280 p.
Caberoy, N.B. and G. F. Quinitio. 2000. Changes in Na+,K+-ATPase activity and gill chloride cell morphology in the grouper Epinephelus coioides larvae and juveniles in response to salinity and temperature. Fish Physiol. Biochem. 23: 83-94.
Quinitio, G.F., J.D. Tan-Fermin and A. Nagai. 2001. Possible application of mibolerone for induced sex inversion of grouper Epinephelus coioides. Fisheries Sci. 67: 232-237.
Toledo, J.D., N.B. Caberoy, G. F. Quinitio, C.H. Choresca and H. Nakagawa. 2002. Effects of salinity, aeration and light intensities on oil globule absorption, feeding incidence, growth and survival of early stages of grouper Epinephelus coioides larvae. Fisheries Sci. 68: 478-483.
Toledo, J.D., N.B. Caberoy and G. F. Quinitio. 2004. Environmental factors affecting embryonic development hatching and survival of early stage larvae of the grouper (Epinephelus coioides). p. 10-16. In M.A. Rimmer, S. McBride and K.C. Williams (eds.). Advances in Grouper Aquaculture. Canberra. ACIAR Monograph No. 110. 137 p.
Quinitio, G.F., A.C. Sa-an, J.D Toledo and J.D. Tan-Fermin. 2004. Changes in the gastrointestinal tract and associated organs during early development of the grouper Epinephelus coioides. p 26-29. In M.A. Rimmer, S. McBride and K.C. Williams (eds.). Advances in Grouper Aquaculture. Canberra. ACIAR Monograph No. 110. 137 p.
Quinitio, G.F., A.C. Sa-an, J.D Toledo and J.D. Tan-Fermin. 2004. Localization of enzymes in the digestive system during early development of the grouper Epinephelus coioides. p 30-34. In M.A. Rimmer, S. McBride and K.C. Williams (eds.). Advances in Grouper Aquaculture. Canberra. ACIAR Monograph No. 110. 137 p.
Alava, V.R., F.M.P Priolo, J.D. Toledo, J.C. Rodriguez, G. F. Quinitio, A.C. Sa-an, M.R. de la Peña and R.C. Caturao. 2004. Lipid Nutrition studies on grouper (Epinephelus coioides) Larvae. p. 47-52. In M.A. Rimmer, S. McBride and K.C. Williams (eds.). Advances in Grouper Aquaculture. Canberra. ACIAR Monograph No. 110. 137 p.
Pomeroy, R.S., R. Agbayani, M. Duray, J. Toledo and G. Quinitio. 2004. The financial feasibility of small-scale grouper culture in the Philippines. Aquacult. Econ. and Mngt. 8: 61-84.




Prof. Pepito M. Fernandez: An Educator, A Scientist and An Administrator
By
Melchor F. Cichon
April 27, 2005

In the next 15 to 20 years, the sea will become the basket of food to Filipinos.
That is if our people will not pollute it.
This was the prediction of Prof. Pepito Fernandez, the former dean of the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of the Philippines in the Visayas, Miag-ao, Iloilo, when this writer interviewed him on September 1, 1997 at his office in Miag-ao, Iloilo.
He further said that since our arable land area is becoming smaller and smaller because of the conversion of lands into subdivisions and commercial centers, our people will focus their attention to the sea to seek food and livelihood.
He laments, however, that our government is not giving as much attention as it does to agriculture. This is one of the many reasons why he advocated together with Dr. Flor Lacanilao for the approval of the Fisheries Code. He believes that this Code will enhance greater fishery production. Of course, the results of this Code will not be immediate, but with an umbrella organization, like a Department of fisheries or a Fisheries Commission, coordination of programs, projects and activities on fisheries will be better managed.
And funding on fisheries will be optimized.
The Code was approved on February 25, 1998 as RA No. 8550 known as Philippine Fisheries Code of 1998. It is an act providing for the development, management and conservation of the fisheries and aquatic resources, integrating all laws pertinent thereto, and for other purposes.
No department nor a commission on fisheries was established. Instead the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources was reconstituted, and a position of Undersecretary for Fisheries and Aquatic Resources was created.
Prof. Fernandez also laments on the situation of fisheries education in the country. He said that many of our fisheries schools can not pass the standard for Bachelor of Science in Fisheries and Diploma in Fisheries Technology Programs. He said that many of our fisheries schools and colleges lack human and physical resources. He knew this because he was a member of the committee who had been tasked by the Department of Education, Culture and Sports (DECS) to evaluate tertiary fisheries schools in the country. By lack of human resources, he means the lack of highly trained faculty and research staff of these schools. According to him, a great majority of the faculty members of the tertiary schools in the country today do not have masteral degrees in fisheries or biology from reputable universities like U.P., Ateneo de Manila, and De La Salle University. Aside from this, the schools lack scientific equipment, books, journals and other reading materials on fisheries and related subjects to support their academic programs. Of course there are some fisheries colleges that have considerable human and physical resources, like the College of Fisheries of Central Luzon State University, the Iloilo State College of Fisheries and the Regional Institutes of Fisheries Technology (RIFT). But there are only seven RIFTs in the country. So we can see what kind of fisheries graduates we have.
What he envisions is a college of fisheries that “institutes degree programs that address the need for sustainable development of the country’s fisheries resources and can respond to the call for highly trained manpower in the field. Its curricular offerings both in the graduate and the undergraduate levels aim to impart to their students theoretical knowledge and practical skills, toward innovative approaches and solutions to fisheries and related problems.” In short, what we need are fisheries graduates who will lead and initiate changes to sustain fishery development in the Philippines.
It is good that there are colleges and universities like the University of the Philippines and the Central Luzon State University that have been producing graduates who have played significant roles in the upliftment of fisheries in our country. But again these are very few.
Prof. Fernandez was born on May 5, 1936 in Camiling, Tarlac. His father was a farmer, while his mother was a housewife.
Because of poverty, Pete, as he is fondly called by his colleages, worked his way to college.
While studying in high school at the Tarlac Agricultural College, he worked as a poultry caretaker of that school from 1953-1957. It was there where he developed his interest in research. As a caretaker of the poultry farm, he noticed that it was difficult to determine which hens were poor layers, so he suggested that each layer be caged individually. His supervisor approved his suggestion. And it proved his point. From then on, they knew which layer should be culled early or not.
The systematic method used by Pete in poultry husbandry caught the attention of their superintendent, Nemenzo Bacalso.
Because of this, Superintendent Bacalso encouraged Pete to take up agriculture.
In 1960, Pete enrolled at U.P. Los Baños taking up poultry husbandry. But after a year, through the encouragement of his relative, he transferred to the College of Fisheries, U.P. , Diliman, Quezon City. He thought that enormous challenges were awaiting him in fisheries than in agriculture.
And so far he has no regrets for having taken Fisheries as a career.
Immediately after finishing taking his Bachelor of Science in Fisheries degree in 1966, the College Dean, Prof. Rogelio O. Juliano employed him as research assistant in his research project. Upon termination of the Dean’s project, he applied for a work at the Commission of Fisheries at Port Area, Manila. But when he met Section Head Herminio R. Rabanal, he turned him down.
“This is not the place for you, Mr. Fernandez,” Chief Rabanal told him. “And even if there is a vacancy here,” the Chief further said, “still I will not take you in.” Rabanal must have thought that Prof. Fernandez could earn more money and experiences if he would work in another agency.
And Pete did look for a job in a private firm. He was employed at Litton Mills and Co. in 1968. It was in this company where Prof. Fernandez career as a fisheries scientist started. He worked there as a shrimp biologist together with two Japanese scientists. The project was successful that a new site was established in Tawi-Tawi to be headed by him.
To prepare for the position, he was asked to attend seminars on personnel administration in Manila. In one of his trips to Manila, he learned that the main plant of Litton Mills and Co. was burned down. This incident weakened the shrimp project. Although he was still receiving his salary even without working, he got bored. He decided to seek other employment. Although it was difficult to grant his request for the company already had invested some amount of money on him, he was eventually allowed to leave. But he pledged to come back if ever his services were needed.
He applied for a job at the UP College of Fisheries in Diliman, Quezon City. At that time the dean of the college was Prof. Rogelio O. Juliano. Luckily Prof. Juliano hired him as a Research Assistant. He was assigned at the Institute of Fisheries Development and Research (IFDR), 1968-1970.
In 1970, Prof. Juliano hired him as an instructor of the then College of Fisheries. After four years, Prof. Fernandez became the Secretary of the College. Ten years later, he was appointed as Chairman of Department of Inland Fisheries, College of Fisheries, U.P. Because of his good record as an administrator and other qualifications, Prof. Juliano appointed him as UP in the Visayas Vice-Chancellor for Administration, when the former became the second UPV Chancellor. Chancellor Juliano replaced Chancellor Dionisia Rola when the latter retired on April 30, 1987.
While employed as a faculty and administrator, Prof. Fernandez served as Aquaculture Consultant to some private agencies. Three of which are Trivino Fishpond Project, 1984-1987; DM Consunje Fishpond Project, 1984-1986; and Benguet Management Corporation., 1984-1986. It was here where he developed his pet project: modular method of raising sugpo (prawn).
According to him this method of sugpo farming gives a much higher production than the traditional one, up to 5 folds. Under natural feeding, it enables the farmer to harvest up to 5 times a year for an aggregate yield of up to 2 tons per hectare. If required at all, supplemental feeding maybe resorted to only during the later part of the culture period, or as the growth rates of the prawns so indicate. Thus, this method entails relatively low cost of production with very lucrative returns. The pond operates with three pond series of different bottom elevations. Four weeks or so after stocking the nursery pond (NP), growout pond (GP-1) would be prepared to accommodate the juveniles from the NP. While the stock are at the GP-1, the nursery pond and the grow-out pond two (GP-2) would be prepared to accommodate a new batch of postlarvae and the post juveniles from fry source and GP-1 respectively. The process goes on cyclically every 40-45 days. Moreover, the method maximizes the use of labor and space without altering so much the technical attitude and temperament of the fish farmers. Recommended pond ratio is 1:2.5-3:5-6 (NP:GP-1:GP-2).
His other vital research undertakings include (1) nursery technique for sugpo in pond. Here provisions of shelters are provided to ensure high survival rate up to 94% for a 30-day rearing from the postlarvae. This could be in the form of coconut frond; dried branches or twigs of bamboo or non-toxic indigenous materials tied into small bundles. (2) Crab (Scylla serrata) fattening in pens installed in pond and in mangrove areas. The pens inhibit the crabs from escaping and boring holes on the dikes and utilizes spaces in mangrove areas without cutting the vital trees.
He has written and published books, articles and monographs. Some of these are the following: Fishery Arts for Secondary Schools: Exploratory (co-author). MBF Mercantile Corp., Quezon City, 1980. 322p.; A Manual in Fish Culture III. (major author, together with Crispino A. Saclauso and Arnulfo N. Marasigan), UPV College of Fisheries, Iloilo City, 1987. 159p.; Philippine Recommends for Bangus, 1976 (co-athored with Rogelio O. Juliano, Flerida M. Arce, Melchor M. Lijauco and Leda G. Handog); “Prawn farming in the Philippines: problems and prospects,” UPV Fisheries Journal 1(1):13-22 1985.
For his many achievements in and out of the academe, Prof. Fernandez has received the following awards: Most Outstanding Alumnus (Fisheries), Tarlac College of Agriculture, Camiling, Tarlac, April 9, 1985; Most Outstanding Faculty Award of 1986, U.P. in the Visayas, April 28, 1987.
Although Dean Fernandez has already achieved many things which many other individuals have not, yet he still has some dreams. He hopes that his modular method of sugpo farming be adopted by sugpo farmers to avoid the many diseases that have plagued the industry; that fisheries education in our country be improved so we can train and produce not only technical fisheries graduates but future leaders and scientists who will help accelerate fisheries development in our country; that the objectives of the Fisheries Code be realized soonest so that fisheries as a whole in our country will be better managed. Finally, he hopes that our fisheries students will acquire the appropriate information and technologies to better equip them in fighting whatever challenges that will confront them.
Finally, when this writer asked Dean Fernandez how he should be remembered, he said: as a scientist, as an educator and as an administrator.

Bibliography
His curriculum vitae, 1996. 11p.
Personal Interview, September 1, 1997.





Erlinda S. Ganzon-Naret:
The Rising Fisheries Nutrition Researcher
Melchor F. Cichon
October 17, 2006


Erlinda S. Ganzon-Naret was born on October 25, 1953 in Iloilo City from a poor family.
She is the 3rd child of Mr. Cirilo B. Ganzon and Mrs. Elena S. Ganzon (both deceased).
To survive, Indang, as her friends and colleagues fondly call her, used to vend cigarettes, melon juice and boiled bananas in their neighborhood in Iloilo City.
As a child, Indang dreamed of becoming a doctor, however due to the meager income of her parents she could not enroll to this medical profession.
But she could become a successful professional in another field.
So she studied hard.
She finished her elementary education at the Iloilo Central Elementary School in Iloilo City in 1966 and finished her secondary education with honors at the Iloilo City National High School in Molo, Iloilo City in 1970.
After graduating from high school, she took and successfully passed the Timawa Scholarship examination that was funded by the Iloilo City government. She enrolled at the University of San Agustin and took up a B.S. Biology degree. She graduated cum laude in 1974.
In April 1978, she applied as Research Assistant at UP Brackishwater Aquaculture Station under the research project funded by the National Science Development Board (NSDB).
To further develop her potential as an effective researcher, Ms. Naret was allowed to take a master’s degree in Aquaculture at the UP in the Visayas (UPV) as a UNDP-FAO-UPV scholarship grantee. This was part of the faculty and staff development program of UPV, and was conferred the degree in 1989.
Again, in 1990, she was able to get her Master of Agriculture at the West Visayas State University in Iloilo City.
With this background, she carves her way to fisheries nutrition.
She finds this aspect of fisheries science challenging because it entails a lot of patience and sacrifices just to get reliable results. And find satisfaction when the finished article is published in a peer-reviewed journal. In most cases, she has to work overtime to carefully monitor his experiment and to write acceptable journal articles.
Her researches focus on fish nutrition particularly on rabbit fishes, sea bass, and tilapia using indigenous feed ingredients and live feeds to sustain fish production. (Please see some of her publications at the end of this write-up)
Indang has served as a project leader on the effects of different protein levels on the growth, food conversion and survival of sea bass (Lates calcarifer) in brackishwater ponds in March 1988 until March 1989.
This was followed by another project on the performance of young sea bass (Lates calcarifer) fed with fish silage in April 1994 until March 1995.
As a result of her researches, she was able to attend the Third Asian Fisheries Forum in Singapore on October 26-30, 1992 and the Fourth Asian Fisheries Forum in Beijing , China on October 15-21, 1995.
In May 2004, she presented her research on The Effect of Dietary Inclusion of Selected Soy Products as Partial Replacement for Fish Meal on the Growth and Feed Utilization of Oreochromis niloticus at the 7th Asian Fisheries Forum in Penang, Malaysia.
Prior to this, Ms.Naret attended the Training Course for Senior Aquaculturists in Asia and the Pacific in India , China and Thailand in March 1988 to March 1989. She also attended the international training course on aquaculture and extension in Israel in June-July, 1993.
In recognition of her dedicated and meritorious contributions to fisheries, Ms. Naret received, among others, the following awards:
1. International Publication Award for 2006 for research paper entitled: Comparison of fatty acid profile between cultured and wild caught grouper Epinephelus cioides. In Aquaculture Science 53(2):127-134 (2005)
2. Outstanding Professional Jubilarian Award in the Field of Fisheries, July 23, 2004 given by the UP Alumni Association (UPAA) Iloilo Chapter.
3. Chancellor's Award for the Most Outstanding Research, Extension and Professional Staff (REPS) given by the UPV on July 25, 2003.
4. 2004 Most Outstanding CFOS Research, Extension and Professional Staff (REPS), July 2, 2004, UPV-CFOS 60th Foundation Day.
5 .International Publication Award for 2003 given on March 17, 2004 for her research paper entitled: Performance of indigenous protein sources as diets for tilapia under laboratory condition. This was published in Fisheries Science, vol. 68, Supplement 1, pp. 797-800.
6. UPV Service Award for 25 years of service, given on July 25, 2003.
7. Platinum award given by UPV Employees Cooperative in February 2005.

Ms. Naret is also a member of Asian Fisheries Society, and of the National Research Council of the Philippines.

Her publications include the following:
1. Naret, E. S. G., Koshio, S. Teshima, S. and Ishikawa, M. 2005. Utilization of solvent extracted soybean meal in pelleted feed for Tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). UPV J. Nat. Sci. 10(1):9-16.
2. Toledo , JD, Naret, E.S.G., Nakagawa, H. 2005. Comparison of fatty acid profile between cultured and wild caught grouper, Epinephelus coioides. Aquqculture Science 53(2):127-134.
3. Naret, E.S. G., Koshio, S., Teshima, S., Ishikawa, M. 2005. Performance of indigenous protein sources as diets for tilapia under laboratory condition. Fisheries Science 68 Supplement I, pp. 797-800.
4. Naret, E.S.G. 2002.Performance of young sea bass (Lates calcarifer) fry fed diets with fish silage. UPV J. Nat Sci. 4:32-40.
5. Naret, E.S. G. 1995. Effects of different protein levels on the growth, feed conversion and survival of sea bass (Lates calcarifer) in brackishwater ponds. In Proceedings of the Fourth Asian Fisheries Forum in Beijing , China , October 16-20, 1995.
6. Naret, E.S.G., Fermin, A. C. 1994. Effect of delayed feeding of Artemia salina and partial replacement of Moina macrocopa on growth and survival of sea bass, Lates calcarifer (Bloch) larvae. Israel Journal of Aquaculture-BAMIDGEH 46 (1):48-52.
7. Naret, E.S. G., Catedrilla, L. 1994. Culture of Siganus guttatus in brackishwater ponds. Philippine Scientists 31:58-66.
8. Naret, E. S. G. 1991. Effect of supplementary diets containing various levels of protein on the growth and survival of Siganus guttatus in ponds planted with lumut. Fisheries Research Journal of the Philippines 16(1-2):15-21.
9. Naret, E. S. G. 1990. Effects of incorporating farmyard manures on soil organic matter under submerged condition. Graduate Research Paper. Master of Agriculture. West Visayas State University , 2nd semester 1990.

From a Research Assistant in 1978, Ms. Naret now works as a University Researcher III at the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of the Philippines in the Visayas, Miag-ao, Iloilo.
She now resides in Miag-ao, Iloilo with her husband, Jose Naret of Miag-ao, Iloilo , and their four children: Ma. Ellen Rose, Jlyn, Joe Carlo, and JC Vincent.





Dr. Glenn D. Aguilar: the Energetic Scholar
by
Melchor F. Cichon
September 6, 2006

At 42, Dr. Glenn Doromal Aguilar was chosen as the 7th Chancellor of the University of the Philippines in the Visayas, Iloilo, Philippines.
His appointment as Chancellor of UP in the Visayas was based, among others things, on his track record as a faculty, researcher, administrator, leadership, scholarship, linkages, commitment and loyalty.
Born on December 23, 1963 in Jaro, Iloilo City, Dr. Aguilar has been an "exemplar of excellence" since his high school days at Central Philippine University, Iloilo City in 1980, and even until after he got his Doctor of Engineering (Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering) in 1996 at the University of Tokyo. He got his Master of Science in Engineering (Ocean Engineering) at the University of Washington, USA, in 1988 under the World Bank Fellowship.
He graduated valedictorian at CPU Developmental High School in 1980. But before his graduation from high school, he was a Gerry Roxas Leadership Awardee, and was selected as one of the Ten Outstanding High School Students of Iloilo (Gov. Conrado Norada Award), both in 1980.
From CPU he proceeded to the College of Fisheries, University of the Philippines in Diliman for his Bachelor of Science in Fisheries, major in marine fisheries, and graduated cum laude in 1984.
While a student at UPCF (now UPV-CFOS), he was a recipient of President Ferdinand E. Marcos Scholarship in Fisheries, the present BFAR Scholarship for four years, 1980-1984.
Science and mathematics were the pet subjects of Dr. Aguilar since high school and these subjects were boosted when he entered college.
As a marine fisheries student, knowledge on these two subjects is very useful as there are several subjects in fisheries that require expertise on science and mathematics. All the majors and higher subjects in fisheries are science-based like phycology (study of algae), navigation, calculus, and physics.
Because of his mathematical and systematic way of doing things, he was appointed as a research aide even before he finished his college.
Upon graduation, he was immediately hired as a faculty of his alma mater.
As a faculty, Dr. Aguilar was involved in several research projects. This can be seen on his list of researches, publications, creative works and inventions, but mostly on fishing crafts. As of November 2005, he has published more than thirty papers, mostly as the major author. (Please see the partial list at the end of this profile.)
In between his work as a faculty and as a graduate student, Dr. Aguilar has held various administrative positions as Director of IMFO, CFOS, Vice-Chancellor for Planning and Development, UP in the Visayas. The highest position he got is being the Chancellor of the University of the Philippines in the Visayas.
He is the youngest among the UPV Chancellors.
Outside of the university, Dr. Aguilar served, among other, as Project leader like Philippine marine transportation system project (UP CID), 2000. He was also the National Team Leader of the Capture Fisheries Network (under the DA-BFAR Research, 1999-2004.
From these numerous works, Dr. Aguilar has won several awards, citations, honors and scholarships like:
2006 Outstanding Professional of the Year Award in the Field of Fisheries, given by the Professional Regulation Commission to "a professional as recommended by his/her peers for having demonstrated exceptional professional competence and integrity in the practice of his/her profession; participated meaningfully in professional activities through the professional organization; contributed significantly to the advancement of the profession and to the effective discharge of the profession's social responsibility through meaningful contribution/participation in socio-civic activities."
Fulbright Research Scholar, Oregon State University, August 2004- May 2005.
First Place winner, 5th National Science and Technology Fora and Competition for Outstanding R & D in Industry and Energy (PCIERD-DOST), March 19, 2004
AFMA Outstanding Paper Award, Knowledge based system for the selection and monitoring of marine fishery reserves. National Research symposium, DA-BAR, October 4, 2001.
Graduate Paper Award, Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, USA, 1988.
He was included in Marquis Who’s Who in the World 2000-2005.
There is a saying that says: the fuller the grain, the lower it bends. This is what we see in Dr. Aguilar when we meet him.
An article about him says it all:
"This superior professional has a humble demeanor. It is not an unusual sight to see "Sir Glenn" comfortably chatting or playing sports with rank-and-file personnel or utility workers. He is known to be readily helpful , i.e. sharing notes with classmates, tutoring students, extending a contribution.
He is married to Dr. Riza O. Aguilar, also of the UPV CFOS. They have two children.
Here are some of his researches/publications/creative works/inventions.
Aguilar, G. D. 1996. Current approaches for sharing design information. UPV Journal of Natural Sciences 1(2):150-159.
Aguilar, G. D. 1997. Comparative analysis of hull forms of selected Philippine indigenous fishing craft. UPV Journal of Natural Sciences 2(1):17-43.
Aguilar, G. D. 1997. Computer modelling of indigenous fishing crafts. UPV Journal of Natural Sciences 2(1):44-59.
Aguilar, G. D. 1998. Development of a ubiquitous ship design and general arrangement system. College of Fisheries, UP Visayas, Miagao, Iloilo. Terminal Report.
Aguilar, G. D. 1998. Development of small craft hull forms using an intranetbase marine vehicle design and model testing equipment. College of Fisheries UP in the Visayas, Miagao, Iloilo. 45p. Terminal Report.
Aguilar, G. D. 1999. The selection tool: a system for simple decision making. Proceedings, 7th National convention on Statistics. National Statistics coordination board, November 1999.
Aguilar, G. D. 2000. Some maritime transport concerns. Public Policy 4(1):93-119.
Aguilar, G. D. 2001.The national integrated research development and extension agenda and program for Philippine capture fisheries. International Seminar on Responsible Capture fisheries in Coastal Waters of Asia: Case Studies and Researches for sustainable Development and Management of Tropical Fisheries. September 24-27, 2001. UPV Miag-ao, Iloilo.
Aguilar, G. D. 2003. The RORO system of the Philippine Archipelago. Proceedings Joint meeting of the Asian Marine transportation Cooperation Program (JSPS) Hiroshima University Oct 22-23, 2003.
Aguilar, G. D. 2004. Philippine fishing boats, p. 118-121. In DA-BFAR (Department of Agriculture-Bureau of fisheries and Aquatic Resources). In turbulent seas: The status of Philippine marine fisheries. Coastal Resource Management Project, Cebu City, Philippines. 378p
Aguilar, G. D. 2004. Present and future role of the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences in fisheries and coastal resource management. In: Villareal, L. V., V. Kelleher, and U. Tietze, eds. Guidelines on the collection of demographic and socio-economic information on fishing communities for use in coastal and aquatic resources mangement. FAO Fisheries Technical Paper, No. 439. Rome, FAO,pp. 69-79.
Aguilar, G. D. Shigehiro, R. Kuroda, T. September 2001. Resistance characteristics of the Philippine outrigger fishing crafts. UPV Journal of Natural Science 6(1-2):46-54.
Aguilar, G. D. Strengthening of fishing craft provisions in the Fisheries Code: redefining the boat sizes. Proceedings of the conference n Revision of the Fisheries Code, Institute for Small-scale Industries (ISSI) UP Diliman, Quezon City, July 28-29, 2003.
Aguilar, G. D., Koyama, T. and Yamato, H. 1996. Knowledge base construction using combined knowledge acquisition and knowledge modelling approaches. Proceedings of the 9th International conference in Engineering Application of Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems, Fukuoka, Japan, June 4-7, pp. 283-288.
Aguilar, G. D., Koyama, T., and Yamato, H. December 1993. An approach to knowledge acquisition for the hull form design of fishing crafts, 2nd report: Object oriented methodology for the rapid development of procedural tools and interactive elicitation for hull selection. Journal of the Japan Society of Naval Architects (174).
Aguilar, G. D., R. Shigehiro and T. Kuroda. 2001. Resistance characteristics of Philippine outrigger fishing craft. UPV J. Nat. Sci. 6:46-54.
Aguilar, G. D., Yamato, H. and Koyama, T. 1996. Development of a knowledge-based system using a combined knowledge acquisition and knowledge modelling approach. Industry & Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference, Fukuoka, Japan, June 4-7, 1996, pp. 283-288.
Aguilar, G. D., Yamato, H. and Koyama, T. December 1996. An approach to knowledge acquisition for the hull form design of fishing craft, (3rd report). Implementation of a hull form definition system using hull variation and shape aggregation techniques. Journal of the Japan Society of Naval Architects (178):755-765.
Aguilar, G. D., Yamato, H. and Koyama, T. June 1996. Development of a hull form definition with a related knowledge based on advisory system. Journal of Marine Science and Technology 1(2):138-148.
Aguilar, G., Shigehiro R., Yamakoshi Y and Kuroda T. 2002. Safety related characteristics of Philippine indigenous outrigger crafts. Fisheries Science vol. 68 Supplement II, pp. 1819-1882.
Aguilar, G.D. and Tiapson, R. J. 2003. Fishery policy helper: A Database Management system of fishery related Policies. UPV J. Nat. Sci. 8:226-234.
Aguilar, G.D., Ambatang, R. J., Tiapson, R., Cagalaban, G. and Giner J. 2003. Knowledge based tools for supporting fisheries management. UPV J. Nat. Sci. 8:192-204.
Aguilar, Glenn D., Ambatang, rina Joy, Tiapson, Rhoderick, Cagalaban, giovanni and giner, JJ. June 2003. Knowledge based tools for supporting fisheries management. UPV J. Nat. Sci. 8(1-2):192-204.
Sahigehiro, R, GD Aguilar, T. Kuroda, A. Kawai. 2002. Simulation studies on maneuvering motions of Philippine outrigger craft in wind. Asia Pacific Workshop on Marine Hydrodynamics (APHydro 2002) and Asia Pacifc Maritime Congress 90th anniversary of KSNAJ, May 21-23, 2002 Kobe, Japan.
Shigehiro R, Aguilar G and Kuroda T. 2002. Evaluation methods of seakeeping performance for training ships from the viewpoint of passenger comfort. Fisheries Science vol. 68 Supplement II, pp. 1827-1830.
Shigehiro R, Aguilar GD, Kuroda T, Kawai A and Matsuda A. 2002. Characteristics of maneuvering motions of Philippine outrigger craft. Jounral of the Kansai Society of Naval Architects, Japan No. 238, pp. 113-120 September 2002.
Shigehiro, R., Aguilar GD, Kuroda T, Kagaruki H 2003. Characteristics of manuevering motions of Philippine outrigger craft in wind. Proceedings of the International conference on Marine Simulation and Ship Maneuverability MARSIM’03 august 25-28, 2003 (Japan)
Shigehiro, R., G. D. Aguilar and T. Kuroda. 2001. Turning performance of outrigger craft in the Philippines. UPV J. Nat. Sci. 6:55-68.




Dr. Benjamin Jareta Gonzales: The Multi-Specialist
By
Melchor F. Cichon
August 24, 2006
Updated: May 14, 2009

It’s breathtaking looking at the full-pack 22-page bio-data of Dr. Benjamin J. Gonzales.
In a span of 25 years from the time he graduated from his B.S. Fisheries at the College of Fisheries, U.P. (now College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, UP in the Visayas) until this time as Vice President for Research, Extension, and Development of the Western Philippines University,he has accomplished so much specially on fisheries resource management.
He has published 7 books and booklets, 5 chapters of different books, 21 journal articles, four brochures, 2 magazine articles, and 3 unpublished papers, and  4 papers presented in symposia. He has held various administrative posts and has conducted numerous researches.
He has practically visited the whole Philippines from Aparri to General Santos and has gone to Canada and Japan either as a resource person or a presenter/lecturer.
He too has been a member of the following scientific organizations:
Aquaculture Society of Japan, 1995
Asian Fisheries Society, 1997
Federation of Institutions of Marine Science and Fisheries, 2004
Ichthyological Society of Japan, 1993
Japanese Society of Fisheries Science, 1995
Kurosho Sphere, 1994
Network for Tropical Fisheries Scientist, 1996

Dr. Gonzales was born in Iloilo City on September 13, 1957. His mother is a retired principal of UP High School in Iloilo where he also graduated. After finishing high school, the young Benjamin took a fisheries degree at the College of Fisheries in Diliman, Quezon City, majoring in Marine Fisheries.
Four events and motivations led him to take up fisheries.

1. His inherent love for fishes. During his early high school days, he loved to observe fishes in the aquarium. He was curious on how they sleep, their food preferences, how they breed, etc.
2. When he saw in the newspaper the photograph of the R/V Albacore, the then newly acquired research vessel of UP College of Fisheries, he told himself that one day he would board this ship.
3. He was motivated by the success of his uncle in his fisheries career.
4. He was inspired by the macho and tough image of fishermen.

After graduation he worked as a checker at the Milita Shipyard, Malabon, Metro Manila. Then he worked as a fisherman and net mender at Ricsan Development Corporation, Navotas, Metro Manila. On 1982 to 1987, he worked as a fishery industry specialist at Palawan National Agricultural College Regional Institute of Fisheries Technology.
He then took his master of science at Koichi University in Japan in 1994 majoring in marine biology. Three years after that, he received his Ph. D. in fish ecology and population genetics at Ehime University, Japan.. His dissertation is entitled: Ecological and genetic studies on the biodiversity of dragonets (Gobiesociformes: Callionymidae) in Southwestern Japan.

It was in Japan where his expertise in various aspects of fisheries was developed.

Let us hear directly from him:

"Dr. Benjamin Gonzales is a Fisheries and Coastal Resource Management Specialist, a full-fledged professor, scientist/researcher, and an academician.
"He works extensively on various aspects of the coastal resource management since 1989.
"Dr. Gonzales specializes in studies of biodiversity of fishes and integrated coastal resource management, which include resource assessments, resource protection and rehabilitation, and project impact assessments.
"He was engaged as Fisheries and Coastal Management Adviser and Integrated Coastal Resource Management Specialist in the ADB and JBIC funded BFAR-Fisheries Resource Management Project for six years.
"Also behind him is his four-year experience in a co-management project in coastal resources in partnership with the Marine Institute International of the Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada, which included a cross study visit regarding Professionalization of Fisheries and Implications of Fisheries Science to Fisheries Management in Canada.
"He also works as researcher for fish visual census in coral reefs.
"His works in CRM, particularly, on integrated coastal resource protection and rehabilitation gained popularity not only in Palawan, but also in other regions of the country, Bicol and Caraga.
"He served as adviser, consultant, project leader, team leader, and researcher in many fish and coastal and marine resource conservation and development projects, including island resources, bay environmental profile, and coastal resource assessments.
"He headed numerous coastal resource projects funded by both local and foreign agencies and documents his experiences, gained skills, and knowledge in numerous books, manuals, and papers which he authored, "Palawan Foodfishes", "Honda Bay Fisheries Management", "Puerto Bay and Honda Bay, Palawan: an Ecological Profile", "Healing Nature with ICRM, Implementor’s Perspective", etc. His complete list of publications can be found at the end of this write-up.
"He administered and organized uncountable local and national CRM related workshops, and international workshops on CRM-Philippines funded by CIDA.
"He also contributed as author to chapters of several CRM books.
"Dr. Gonzales has long teaching experience in subjects both in graduate and undergraduate school of the Western Philippines University: Study of fishes, fishing gears and technology, marine ecology, fisheries management, and population genetics.
"He organized and facilitated the workshop with his colleagues that lead to the drafting of six instructional manuals for different subjects in B. S. Fisheries Program. He spearheaded the accreditation of the B. S. Fisheries Program to become the Center of Excellence (COE) in Fisheries Education in Region IV.
"Dr. Gonzales was responsible for the creation of the Aquatic Biology Program of WPU, which is now gaining recognition for research. He also initiated the development of the M. Sc. in Marine Biology Program now offered at WPU.
"He served in the academe as Department Head, Chairman-on-Instruction, Officer-in-Charge, Campus Dean, and Vice President on Research and Extension."
"Dr. Gonzales has received various recognition and appreciation certificates for his contributions to fish conservation, coastal resource conservation and rehabilitation from: communities, LGUs, Regional Offices of BFAR, and the Academe.
"He was also featured in some books for his achievements in his field of expertise."
It cannot be denied that Dr. Gonzales has accomplished so much, yet he still wishes to do something more. He hopes to accomplish bigger book projects, maintain a wholesome family, and create a situation that warrants never ending research.
This is in line with his philosophy in life that knowledge has no boundaries, like human has and that we exist in this world for a purpose.
Here are some of the awards received by Dr. Gonzales:
3rd Best Research Paper, 10th Southern Luzon Zonal R and D Review, Ateneo de Manila University, November 10, 2006
Best Research Paper, 12th Southern Luzon R and D review, Southern Luzon State University, December 4, 2008

3rd Best Research Paper, National Aquatic Resources Research and Development System, PCAMRD, Los Baños,  Laguna, January 10, 2009
Outstanding Faculty member of WPU-PPC (2008-2009), Western Philippines University, Aborlan, Palawan, February 25, 2009.
The following are his publications that he authored and co-authored with other fisheries specialists.

Books

Gonzales, B. J. 2000. Palawan Foodfishes. Palawan Sustainable Development Communications, Corp. 90 pages.
Gonzales, B. J. and J. E. Santa Ana. 2002. Solid Waste Management Training Manual for Local Government, FRMP information paper no. 66. Fisheries Resource Management Project, Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources. Department of Agriculture, Quezon City, Philippines. 78 p.
Gonzales, B. J. 2004. Puerto Princesa Bay and Honda Bay: an ecological profile. FRMP Technical Monograph Series, No. 8 (Ablaza, E C. eds.).Fisheries Resource Management Project, Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources. Department of Agriculture, Quezon City, Philippines. 28 p.
Gonzales, B. J. 2005. A Guide to species selection and principles of stock enhancement in the Philippines (Roldan, R., Ablaza, E. C., Muñoz, J.C., eds.). Fisheries Resource Management Project, Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources. Department of Agriculture, Quezon City, Philippines. 27 p.
Gonzales, B. J. 2005. Palawan Foodfishes, 2nd Ed. BFAR-Fisheries Resource Management Project-Philippine Information Agency, Quezon City Philippines. 100 p.
Gonzales, B. J. and A. L. Avillanosa. 2006. Lecture manuela on fish genetics (T. Abella, ed.). College of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Western Philippines University, Puerto Princesa City, Philippines, 63p.
Pagliawan, H. B., H.P. Palla, and B. J. Gonzales. 2006. lecture manual in fishing technology (Fish 130) (Gonzales, B, J., ed.)  College of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences, Western Philippines University, Puerto Princesa City, Philippines. 63 p.

Book Chapters

Gonzales, B. J. 1999. Species diversity of dragonet fishes along the bathymetrical gradient of Tosa Bay, Japan. Proceedings of the symposium on marine biodiversity in Visayas and Mindanao. W.L. Campos, Ed.. Univ. Phils. in the Vis. 69-73.
Gonzales, B. J. 2004. Fisheries management in Honda Bay, p. 305-311. In DA-BFAR (Department of Agriculture-Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources). In turbulent seas: The status of Philippine marine fisheries. Coastal Resource Management Project, Cebu City, Philippines, 378 p.
Gonzales, B. J. 2005. Community-based stock enhancement of topshell in Honda Bay, Palawan, Philippines. In Report of regional consultation on stock enhancement of species under international concern. Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC), AQD., Iloilo City, Philippines, July 13-15, 2005. XX p (in press.)
Gonzales, B. J. 2005. Basic taxonomy and biology of fishes, p. 97-112. In A handbook on fishery law enforcement team training. Fisheries Resource Management Project, Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources. Department of Agriculture, Quezon City, Philippines, 190 p.
Gonzales, B. J. and E. T. Bhagwani. 2005. Healing nature with ICRM. In Faces of the Sea Implementors’ Perspective, M. A. D. Pascua Ed., p. 7-16. Fisheries Resource Management Project, Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources and the Philippine Information Office. Department of Agriculture, Quezon City, Philippines, 60 p.
Gonzales, b. J., W. M Galon and J. G. Becira. 2006. Community-based stock enhancement of topshell in Honda Bay, Palawan, Philippines, pp. 49-59. In: Proceedings of the regional technical consultation on stock enhancement for threatened species of international concern. Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center (SEAFDEC), Tigbauan 5021, Iloilo, Philippines. 150p.
Papers in Journal

Gonzales, B.J. 1993. The Department of Agriculture. Rep. Inst. Kuroshi Sphere, Kochi Univ., 8: 12-19.
Gonzales, B.J., O. Okamura, K. Nakamura and H. Miyahara. 1994. New
Record of annular sole, Synaptura annularis (Soliedae, Pleuronectiformes) from Japan. Jap. J. Ichthyol., 40: 491-494.
Mishina H. and B.J.Gonzales. 1994. Some biological and ecological aspects on Cromileptes altivelis around Palawan Island, Philippines. Bull. Jap. Aqua. Soc., 42: 345-349. (In Japanese with English abstract.)
Gonzales, B.J.,R.G. Dolorosa, R. Blanco, O. Okamura and T. Maeda. 1994. An artificially made seagrass bed: Its ecological role in a shallow subtidal zone and probable consequences. Bull. Mar. Sci. Fish., Kochi Univ., 14: 57-61.
Gonzales, B.J. and R.G. Dolorosa. 1994. A survey of the serranid and lutjanid fishes in Ulugan Bay, Northwestern Palawan, with notes on their economic aspects. PNAC- Inst. Mar. Sci. Res. J., 1: 32-40.
Gonzales, B.J. and O. Okamura. 1995. Rare occurrence of Bathycallionymus formosanus (Teleostei: Callionymidae) in Tosa Bay. Southern Japan, with ecological notes and recent list of callionymids in the Bay. SPCP-Inst. Mar. Sci. Res. J., 2: 28-36.
Gonzales, B.J. and N. Taniguchi. 1995. Spiny lobster- fishery in Palawan, Philippines: with considerations on its conservation and Management. Bull. Mar. Sci. Fish., Kochi Univ., 15: 121-130.
Gonzales, B.J., O. Okamura and N. Taniguchi. 1996. Spawning behavior of laboratory-reared dragonet, Repomucenus huguenini, and development of its eggs and prolarvae. Suisanzoshoku (Bull. Jap. Aqua. Soc.), 44: 7-15.
Gonzales, B.J., N. Taniguchi and S. Seki. 1996. Genetic markers for twelve species, five genera of dragonets (Gobiesociformes: Callionymidae) revealed through Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) Assay. Fish Genetics and Breeding Science, No. 23: 75-83.
Gonzales, B.J., N. Taniguchi, O. Okamura and Y. Machida. 1996. Diet and Feeding Bahavior of two dragonets Calliurichthys japonicus and Repomucenus huguenini in Tosa Bay, Southern Japan. Fisheries Science, 62: 902-908.
Gonzales, B.J. and N. Watanuki. 1996. Mangrove shoreline fishes of Ulugan Bay, Palawan. SPCP-IMS Res. Journal, SPCP-IMS, 3: 1-10.
Gonzales, B.J., N. Taniguchi, and O. Okamura. 1997. Spawning cycle of two dragonets Calliurichthys japonicus and Repomucenus huguenini in Tosa Bay, Southern Japan. Fisheries Science, 63: 15-21.
Gonzales, B.J. and T.L. Salva. 1997. A larged-sized giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (DeMan) from Dumaran Palawan. SPCP-IMS Res. Journal, SPCP-IMS, 4: 20-24.
Gonzales, B.J. 1997. Five commonly used fishing gears by small-scale fishermen in Palawan, Philippines and some of their implications to fishery management. SPCP- Aqua. Sci. Tech. Inst. Res. J.
Salva, T.L. and B.J. Gonzales. 1997. The SPCP-ASTI initiatives in the Coastal Resource Management of Palawan, Philippines. SPCP- Aqua. Sci. Tech. Inst. Res. J.
Gonzales, B.J. and N. Taniguchi. 1997. Habitat and reproductive traits similarities of dragonet fishes in Tosa Bay, Japan, with notes on their evolutionary history, Bull. Mar. Sci. and Fish, Kochi Univ., 17: 89-96.
Gonzales, B.J., S. Seki, and N. Taniguchi. 1997. Genetic relationships among thirteen species of dragonets (Gobiesociformes: Callionymidae) inferred from allozyme markers, Bull. Mar. Sci. and Fish, Kochi Univ., 17: 97-107.
Gonzales, B. J. 2000. Length-weight relationship of five serranids from Palawan Island, Philippines. Naga, the ICLARM Quarterly. 23, 3: 26-28.
Galon, W., B. J Gonzales, and Becira, J. 2005. Impact assessment of topshell stock enhancement in Honda Bay, Palawan. A paper presented during the Annual Convention of the Federation of Institutions for Marine and Freshwater Sciences (FIMFS), Mindanao State University, Naawan, October 14-16, 2005.
Becira, J., B. J Gonzales, and W. Galon. 2006. Protected versus unprotected area with reference to fishes, corals, macro- invertebrates, and CPUE in Honda Bay, Palawan. The Palawan Scientist, West. Phils. Univ. XX: XX-XX. (in press)
Watanuki, N. and B. J. Gonzales. 2006. The potential of artificial reefs as fisheries management tools in developing countries. Bulletin of Marine Science, 78 (1): 9-19.
Gonzales, B. J., W. Galon, and J. Becira. 2006. Community-based stock enhancement of topshell in Honda Bay, Palawan, Philippines. Report on the regional technical consultation on stock enhancement of species under international concern. SEAFDEC, AQD. (in press)
Mishina, H., B. J. gonzales, H. b. Pagliawan, M. Moteki and H. Kohno. 2006. reproductive biology of blacktip grouper, Epinephelus fasciatus, in Sulu Sea, Philippines. Extrait de La mer (Bulletin de la Societe franco-japonaise d'oceanographie). Tome 44, Nummero 1 Fevrier 2006.
Gonzales, b. J. and M. V. Matillano. 2008. Irrawaddy dolphin conservation in the fisheries of Malampaya Inner Sound, Palawan, Philippines. Memoirs of Faculty of Fisheries, Kagoshima University, Faculty of Fisheries, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima Japan. Special issue 2008: 16-25.
Brochures:

Gonzales, B. J. 1997. Ang Lapu- lapung Senyorita. SPCP-ASTI Information Series No. 1, June 1997.

Dolorosa, R.G. and B.J. Gonzales 1998. Information on the Giant Freshwater Prawn, Ulang. SPCP-ASTI Information Series No. 1, June 1998.
Gonzales, B. J. 2005. Facts about Topshell. Fisheries Resource Management Project-DA-BFAR (Department of Agriculture-Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources) Estuar Building, Quezon Avenue, Quezon City.
Gonzales, B. J. 2005. Impact Assessment of Fish Sanctuary in Binduyan, Honda Bay. Fisheries Resource Management Project-DA-BFAR (Department of Agriculture-Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources) Estuar Building, Quezon Avenue, Quezon City.

Articles

Gonzales, B.J. 2001. Measuring the threat to fish species and populations. Sagip Dagat Bulletin. DA-BFAR, FRMP.4th: 8-9.
Gonzales, B.J. 2002. Trochus restocking as enhancement intervention. Sagip Dagat Bulletin. DA-BFAR, FRMP. 2nd: 11-13.

Unpublished

Gonzales, B. J., W. Galon, F. Galon, J. Becira, H. Pagliawan, E. Rodriguez, G. Bactol, and R. Venturillo. 2005. Resource Assessment for fish sanctuary establishment, St. Paul’s Bay, Western Palawan, Philippines. SAGUDA Palawan, Inc. Puerto Princesa City, Philippines.
Gonzales, B. J. 2005. Facts about five fishes: with reference to their acceptability as cage culture species in Palawan, Philippines. Jeon Chon Fisheries and Agriculture Product Corporation and the Palawan Council for Sustainable Development, Palawan, Philippines.
Gonzales, B. J, Pagliawan, H, and Rodriguez, E. 2005. Diversity and Catalogue of Palawan Fishes, Philippines. A paper presented as poster during the Annual Symposium of the Philippine Association of Marine Science, Palawan State University, Palawan, October 20-22, 2005.
Gonzales, B.J. R. S. Sariego, W. Galon, H. Pagliawan, J. Becira, I. M. P. Benliro, E. Rodriguez, Bernaldo Montaño, and N. Dieron. Pandan island resource assessment: with recommendations for conservation and developmental planning. Western Philippines University and the Legend Hotels International. 56p.




Dr. Rafael D. Guerrero III: the Father of Tilapia Sex-Reversal
By
Melchor F. Cichon
July 18, 2006

Among the Filipino fisheries scientists tilapias have always been linked with Dr. Rafael D. Guerrero III.
Why is this so?
He observed that one of the most prominent problems in tilapia culture is overpopulation. Tilapia matures after two to three months from its fry stage and can produce as much as 5,000 eggs every three months depending on its size.
When he took his doctorate degree in Auburn University in the early 1970s, he focused his dissertation on the the production of monosex tilapia into male using synthetic androgens.
When he returned to the Philippines, he continued his experiment on tilapia sex reversal at the Central Luzon State University in Muñoz, Nueva Ecija where he served as the first dean of its college of fisheries.
And he was successful.
Now, the technology he developed has been adopted not only by Filipino fish farmers but by other fish farmers in other parts of the globe.
This can be seen from the awards he has been receiving here and abroad.
Dr. Guerrero was born in Manila on August 7, 1944. His parents are Rafael Guerrero, Jr. and Rizalina Guerrero.
He took his B.S. (Zoology) at the University of the Philippines in Diliman, Quezon City in 1964 and finished his M.S. (Applied Zoology) from U.P. Los Baños, Laguna in 1970. In 1974, he received his PhD degree in Fisheries Management from Auburn University, USA as a recipient of the NEDA-USAID Postgraduate Scholarship Award.
Two years after that, he became the Dean of the College of Inland Fisheries of Central Luzon State University from 1976 to 1981. Then he worked as Director for Training and Extension of the Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center's Aquaculture Department in 1983.
The year before that, he and his wife, Luzviminda, co-founded the Aquatic Biosystems, an aquaculture consulting firm in 1982.
At present (2006), Dr. Guerrero is the Executive Director of Philippine Council for Aquatic and Marine Research and Development (PCAMRD).
Dr. Guerrero has published a lot of works related to tilapias.
Here are some of his publications, this writer has captured:
Guerrero, R. D. III. 1973. Cage culture of male and female Tilapia mossambicus with and without supplementary feeding in a fertilized pond. Central Luzon State University Science Journal 9:18-20
Guerrero, R. D. and W. L. Shelton. 1974. An aceto-carmine squash method for sexing juvenile fishes. Prog. Fish-Cult. 36-56.
Guerrero, R. D. III. 1974. The use of synthetic androgens for production of monosex male Tilapia aurea (Steindachner). PhD Dissertation, auburn University, Auburn Alabama. 97p.
Guerrero, R. D. III. 1974. Culture of monosex male Tilapia mossambica and Ophiocephalus striatus in fertilized ponds with supplementary feeding. Philippine Journal of Fisheries 12(1-2):64-74.
Guerrero, R. D. 1975. Use of androgens for the production of all-male Tilapia aurea (Steinfachner). Trans. Am. Fish. Soc. 104: 342-348
Guerrero, R. D. III and L. A. Guerrero. 1975. Monosex culture of male and female Tilapia mossambica in ponds at three stocking rates. Kalikasan, Philipp. J. Biol. 4:129-134.
Guerrero, R. D. III and L. A. Guerrero. 1975. Use of androgens for the production of all-male Tilapia aurea (Steindachner). Trans. Am. Fish. Soc. 104:342-348.
Guerrero, R. D. 1976. Culture of Tilapia nilotica at two densities with fertilization and supplemental feeding. Fish Res. J. Philipp. 1(1):39-43
Guerrero, R. D. and T. A. Abella. 1976. Induced sex-reversal of Tilapia nilotica with methyltestosterone. Fish. Res. J. Philipp. 1(2):46-49.
Guerrero, R. D. 1976. Tilapia mossambica and T. zillii treated with ethynyltestosterone for sex-reversal. Kalikasan, Philipp. J. Biol 5:187-192.
Guerrero, R. D. III. Culture of male Tilapia mossambica produced through artificial sex reversal. Proc. FAO Tech. Conf. On Aquaculture, Kyoto, Japan, FAO:AQ/Conf./76/E.15 3p.
Guerrero, R. D. III and L. A. Guerrero. 1976. Culture of Tilapia nilotica and Macrobrachium species separately and in combination in fertilized freshwater fishponds. Phil J. Fish. 14(2):232-235
Guerrero, R. D. 1977. Production of tilapia fry in floating net enclosures. FAO Aquaculture Bulletin 8(3/4):4
Guerrero, R. D. 1979. Culture of male Tilapia mossambica produced through artificial sex reversal, p. 166-168. In T. V. R. Pillay and W.A. Dill (eds.). Advances in aquaculture. Fishing News Books Ltd., Farnham, Surrey, England.
Guerrero, R. D. 1979. Cage culture of tilapia in the Philippines. Asian Aquaculture 2(11);6
Guerrero, R. D. 1979. Use of hormonal steroids for artificial sex reversal of tilapia. Proc. Indian Nat. ?Sci. Acad 45B;512-514.
Guerrero, R. D. and E. P. Villanueva. 1979. Polyculture of Cristaria plicata (leach) at two densities with Tilapia nilotica and Cyprinus carpio in fertilized ponds. Fish. Res. J. Phil 4(2):13-17.
Guerrero, R. D. III. 1980. Studies on the feeding of Tilapia nilotica in floating cages. Aquaculture 20:169-175.
Guerrero, R. D. 1980. How to produce fingerlings of Nile tilapia. Modern Agriculture and Industry—Asia 3(2):4-5
Guerrero, R. D. III, A. G. Cagauan and T. A. Abella. 1980. Pond cultivation of three tilapia hybrids. CLSU Sci. J 1(1):15-18.
Guerrero, R. D. 1981. Bay town cashes in on tilapia bonanza. Asian Farms and Gardens (February):14.
Guerrero, R. D. 1981. Introduction to fish culture in the Philippines. TRC Series. Technology Resources Center, Manila.
Guerrero, R. D. III. 1981. Recent developments in the cage culture of tilapia in the Philippines. Paper presented at the IFS General Assembly Meeting, 12 November 1981, Chiang Mai, Thailand.
Guerrero, R. D. 1982. Control of Tilapia reproduction. , pp. 309-316. In R.S.V. Pullin and R. H. Lowe-McConnell (eds). The biology and culture of tilapias. ICLARM Conference Proceedings 7. International Center for Living Aquatic Resources Management, Manila, Philippines.
Guerrero, R. D. 1982. An overview of tilapia culture in the country. Philippine Farmer’s Journal 24(3):28-29,331,35.
Guerrero, R. D. III., R. C. Sevilleja and A. M. Tolentino. 1982. Studies on the cage culture of Tilapia nilotica in Aya Reservoir and Laguna de Bay, Philippines. Paper presented at the Regional Workshop on Limnology and Water Management in Developing Countries of Asia and the Pacific, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
Guerrero, R. D. and A. M. Garcia. 1983. Studies on the fry production of Sarotherodon niloticus in a lake-based hatchery, p. 388-393. In L. Fishelson and Z. Yaron (comps) Proceedings of the International Symposium on Tilapia in Aquaculture. Tel Aviv University, Tell Aviv, Israel.
Guerrero, R. D. III. 1983. A comparative study on the cage culture of Tilapia nilotica and male T. nilotica x female T. aurea hybrid in Laguna de Bay. Paper presented at the 5th Annual Meeting of the Nations Science Technical Authority, Bicutan, Metro Manila. 6p.
Guerrero, R. D. III and L.A. Guerrero. 1985. Effect of breeder size on fry production of Nile tilapia in concrete pools. Trans. Nat. Acad. Sci. Tech. (Phils.) 7:63-66.
Guerrero, R. D. III and L.A. Guerrero. 1985. Further observations on the fry production of Oreochromis niloticus in concrete tanks. Aquaculture 47:257-261.
Guerrero, R. D. III and L.A. Guerrero. 1985. Outdoor treatment of Nile tilapia fry for artificial sex reversal. Paper presented at the Asian Symposium on Freshwater Fish Culture, Beijing, China, 10-15 October 1985. 6p.
Guerrero, R. D. III. 1985. Tilapia farming in the Philippines: practices, problems and prospects, p. 3-13. In I.R. Smith, E, B. Torres and E. O. Tan (eds.). Philippine tilapia economics. ICLARM conference Proceedings 12, 261p. Philippine Council for Agriculture and Resources Research and Development, Los Baños, Laguna and ICLARM, Manila Philippines.
Guerrero, R, D. 1986. Commercial production of tilapia in freshwater ponds and cages in the Philippines. Paper presented at the First National Symposium and Workshop on Tilapia Farming, PCARRD, Los Baños, Laguna, Philippines, 24-26 November 1986. 12p.
Guerrero, R. D. III. 1987. Tilapia farming in the Philippines. Technology and Livelihood Resource Center and National Book Store, Manila, Philippines. 84p.
Guerrero, R. D. III and L.A. Guerrero. 1988. Feasibility of commercial production of sex-reversed Bile tilapia fingerlings in the Philippines, p. 183-186. In R.S. V. Pullin , T. Bhukaswan, K. Tonguthai and J. L. Maclean (eds.) The Second International Symposium on Tilapia in Aquaculture. ICLARM Conference Proceedings 15, 623. Department of Fisheries, Bangkok, Thailand, and ICLARM, Manila, Philippines.
Guerrero, R. D. III. 1999. Seaweed farming in Batangas. Agriculture 111(10):18-19.
Dr. Guerrero has been a consultant for aquaculture of various government and private corporations such as the Technology and Livelihood Resource Center, San Miguel Corporation and the Meralco Foundation, Inc.
He also served as president of the Fisheries Research Society of the Philippines; Team Leader for Aquaculture Research of the Philippine Council for Agriculture and Resource Research, and served as Director of the Fisheries Research Department, Philippine Council for Aquaculture and Resources Research and Development. He was a Visiting Professor of Aquaculture Management of the CDFM, UPLB and Scientific Adviser for aquaculture of the International Foundation for Science.
For his distinguished career as a researcher, consultant and administrator, Dr. Guerrero received several awards both here and abroad. Among these are the following:
1978--Ten Outstanding Young Men (TOYM) Award for Aquaculture and Fisheries conferred by the Philippine Jaycees.
1980--Ten Outstanding Young Scientists (TOYS) Award given by the National Science and Development Board (NSDB)
1987--IBM Science and Technology Award
1992--Elected Academician by the National Academy of Science and Technology in recognition of his scientific and technological contribution to the development of sex reversal and hatchery technique that led to the commercial production of high yielding market-size tilapia in the Philippines and other countries.
2005-- Mgr. Dr. Jan D.F. Heine Memorial Award by the International "Je Dois Faire" Assembly "in recognition of his outstanding efforts to stimulate sustained improvement of world wide human living standards." And for his pioneering work on tilapia sex reversal technology that contributed significantly to world aquaculture. The award was conferred to Dr. Guerrero by Heine and World Aquaculture Society president Keven Fitzsimmons during the 6th International Symposium on Tilapia in Aquaculture in Manila.
The Mgr. Dr. Jan D.F. Heine Memorial Award is conferred to internationally recognized individual who has worked for the advancement of tilapia science and has also made an impact on the lives of people in developing countries dependent on fish as a major source of animal protein.
Tilapia was once considered as a fishpond culture pest. Today this is called the chicken of the pond.
And its production in 2001 was 106.7 metric tons amounting to PhP12,999,000, second only to milkfish (bangus).
And Dr. Guerrero III has been a part of this development.



Dr. Rogelio Ochoa Juliano: the Generous Achiever
By
Melchor F. Cichon
June 29, 2006

The first time I met Dr. Rogelio Ochoa Juliano, or Roger to his colleagues, was in 1963. I was then a first year student of the College of Fisheries, U.P., Diliman, Quezon City. And I have thought that Dr. Juliano was a very cordial person. Later I discovered that my assessment about him was shared by many. This characteristic of Dr. Juliano has been recognized by no less than the Faculty and Staff of the University of the Philippines in the Visayas (Iloilo campus) when they presented him a Plaque of Recognition on August 22, 1989. In this plaque, it is written " in recognition of his contribution to the growth of the University, steering it towards the direction which he himself helped define; of the leader he has been, approachable, humble yet dignified and diplomatic, exemplying a person who considers his office not as an instrument of power but as a symbol of service; and while being a leader and administrator, he has always been , to everyone , a friend and a colleague."( underscore supplied)
Through the years, I learned more about him as a professor , as an administrator and a scientist. Now I can say that Dr. Rogelio O. Juliano is productive, humble and a generous fisheries scientist and administrator U.P. has produced. Prof. Artemio M. Sarenas of the University of the East called him as a "promising luminary in biological sciences, particularly in the field of aquaculture."
Dr. Juliano was born on May 11, 1934 in Los Baños, Laguna from a family of scholars. His father, Dr. Jose B. Juliano, was a professor of botany in U.P. Los Baños, Laguna. Two of his brothers, Drs. Jose O. Juliano and Bienvenido O. Juliano, were Ten Outstanding Young Men (TOYM) awardees. The former is in nuclear science, while the latter is in Chemistry. The youngest brother, Dr. Petronio O. Juliano, now works as a vice-president of San Miguel Corporation.
He is married to his former classmate at U.P. Diliman, Prof. Araceli F. Lachica, a zoologist, with whom he has five boys and four girls.
After graduation from high school at Laguna Institute, Juliano did not know what to take up as career. His mother talked to Dr. Deogracias Villadolid and was advised to seek admission to the Philippine Institute of Fisheries Technology (PIFT) and from there decided what career to pursue. After graduation from PIFT with honors in 1952, he felt he needed at least a bachelor’s degree to seek better employment. He went to U.P., talked to Dr. Gregorio Velasques of Botany Department and Dr. Leopoldo Clemente of Zoology Department. Because of his father’s advice that there is no money in Botany and knowing he would obtain more advanced credit units in zoology, he majored in zoology.
In 1952, he graduated with honors from this school. The following year he served as a Student Research Assistant at UP Research Center. He then worked as a laborer and instructor of PIFT from 1954-1955. It was also in 1955 when he received his degree in B. S. Zoology, U.P. Immediately after that, 1955-57, he was a Stanford University Gold Star Scholar for his Master of Arts (Biology) degree. At the same time, he worked as a Research Assistant at the Natural Science Foundation, Stanford University. In that same period, he was an Elly Lilli Drug Company fellow in biological sciences, also in Stanford University. This was followed by a fellowship in agricultural sciences sponsored by Rockefeller Foundation.
In 1957, he was back in the Philippines. He worked as an Instuctor in Zoology at the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS), U.P., Diliman from 1957 until 1963. In between these years, 1961, Dr. Juliano was a fellow of Rackman School of Graduate Studies, University of Michigan. This time for his second masteral degree, Master of Science (Fisheries). He did not stay long at CAS, because in 1963, he was appointed as a faculty of the U.P. College of Fisheries. UNESCO awarded Dr. Juliano a fellowship in 1964 in Advanced Marine Biology Training at University of Copenhagen and Institute of Fisheries Research, Copenhagen, Denmark. This was followed by an observation tour to different institutions on hydrology and fisheries in Germany as a German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) Stipendum.
On December 17, 1977, Dr. Juliano received the Professional Achievement Award in the Field of Fisheries, U.P. Alumni Association at the Philippine Village Hotel, Metro Manila. He also received some citations and plaque of recognition for his achievements as a fisheries scientist.
Among the citations he received is the citation in the Philippine Men of Science, vol. 2, 1967. For the plaques of recognition, he got one from the Citizens of Calamba, Laguna, for outstanding contributions in the field of science on June 19, 1974. On July 9,1993, he received a Certificate of Recognition for "invaluable contribution and relentless dedication as chief, Aquaculture Department, SEAFDEC from July, 1979-August , 1980", from the Aquaculture Department, Southeast Asian Fisheries Development Center, Tigbauan , Iloilo.
The contributions of Dr. Juliano in the field of science, particularly fisheries science, are numerous. But I will only highlight some of them.
Aside from being a professor of the College of Fisheries from 1963 until his retirement in 1989, he conducted numerous researches on fisheries and published several articles on fisheries in various journals and magazines here and abroad. He authored or co-authored more than 50 scientific papers. Some of these are :"Seasonal changes in bluegill metabolism," Limnology and Oceanography 4(2);195-209 1959; "Air breathing in fishes," Phi Sigma Science Bulletin, no. 4, 1959, pp. 8-10; "Notes on the tolerance of milkfish fingerlings and fry, Chanos chanos (Forskal), to decreases in salinity," Copeia, no. 1, 1953, pp. 180-181, senior author.; "Trimethylamine and volatile reducing substances in frigate mackerel(Auxis Thazard lapecede)," Philippine Journal of Science. He was the senior author of the famous pamphlet, Philippine Recommends for Bangus, 1976, which was published by PCARR . In 1992, he became a member of the Auburn University Study Team which studied the prawn industry in the Philippines. The team’s report entitled Philippine Prawn Industry Policy Study , which came out in 1993, is considered as the most comprehensive study on prawn industry in the Philippines. Dr. Juliano’s dissertation, The Biology of Milkfish, Chanos chanos (Forskal), and Ecology and Dynamics of Brackishwater Ponds in the Philippines, 1985, can also be considered as a major contribution to the study of bangus. In 1997, he was working on the historical development of inland fisheries in the Philippines from 1897 to 1999.
He has served as a consultant to and project leader on various fisheries projects here and abroad. He was an FAO National Consultant On Aquaculture and Inland Fisheries for the Second National Fisheries Workshop on Policy Planning and Industry Development wherein he wrote background papers on aquaculture and in inland fisheries. He also prepared and presented the strategic management plan for aquaculture/inland fisheries in its workshop in October 1995 to February 1996. In 1976-1978, Dr. Juliano was a consultant to the Philippine Fisheries Education and Training Plan. This project took stock of available educational facilities and capabilities, projected the manpower needs in fisheries and developed a plan for fisheries education/training which could be supported by the World Bank. This became the basis for World Bank support in fisheries education and training in the Philippines. The project was funded by the Ministry of Natural Resources and undertaken by the Educational Development Projects Implementing Task Force (EDPITAF).
He was the first Dean of the College of Fisheries, U.P. in the Visayas to have been appointed twice from 1970 to 1980, and from 1986 to 1987.
As dean, he was able to send several of his faculty members for a study grant abroad as part of the faculty development program of the College. The grants were sponsored by the USAID and the World Bank. Some of them are as follows: Dr. Arsenio S. Camacho, former UPV Chancellor; Dr. Romeo Fortes, formerly Vice-chancellor for Planning and Development, UPV; Dr. Edfren Ed. C. Flores, former dean of the College of Fisheries and former Chief of SEAFDEC-AQD; Dr. Leonor Santos, former Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs, UPV and now dean of the UPV College of Fisheries; Dr. Carlos Baylon, now Director,IFPDS,UPV; Dr. Arnulfo Marasigan, former Director, IA,UPV; Dr. Leonarda Mendoza, present director of IFPT,UPV; Dr. Gaudiosa Almazan-Gonzales, former Secretary, College of Fisheries, UPV; Drs. Armando Tamse, Rodolfo Baldevarona, Liberato Laureta; Erlinda B. Panggat, Crispino Saclauso, Yvonne Chiu, Reynaldo Silvestre and Prof. Nygiel Armada. Prof. Armada was a former Vice-Chancellor for Administration, UPV.
But he forgot himself.
While his faculty members had already earned their respective doctoral degrees, he was still a MS degree holder. It was only in the late 1985 when he earned his PhD degree from the University of Tokyo, Japan under the sponsorship of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science.
It was during his term as Dean of the College when the plan to establish an autonomous university in the Visayas within the UP System with the College of Fisheries as its flagship college took place. He worked closely with Dr. Dionisia A. Rola, then dean of the UP College in Iloilo for the realization of this plan.
When the UP in the Visayas became a reality, he was appointed as Vice-Chancellor for Planning and Development, while Dr. Rola became the Chancellor. On May 1, 1987, he succeeded Dr. Rola as Chancellor of UPV until August 28, 1989.
It was during his term as chancellor of UPV when the UPV College of Fisheries students, faculty, and staff protested against the transfer of UPV CF from Diliman, Quezon City to Miag-ao, Iloilo. But with strong determination to transfer to Miag-ao, the protest bugged down and in 1988, the College of Fisheries transferred to the 800-hectare campus in Miag-ao, Iloilo. Those who did not like the idea had two options: either to stick with UPV-CF or transfer to other UP units. Many remained with UPV-CF, but some transferred later to other UP units in Diliman, Quezon City.
Aside from these major accomplishments, Dr. Juliano served as a member of the Governing Board, Regional Center for Tropical Biology, SEAMEO, Bogor, Indonesia, and Member of Technical Program Planning and Review Board (TPPRB), PCARR, 1975. He was also a member of the Technical Board of the Fishery Industry Development Council. From March 8, 1971 to June 30, 1977, Dr. Juliano was the project Director of the Inland Fisheries Project (NSDB Project no 7103 Ag) with two centers: the Brackishwater Aquaculture Center, Leganes, Iloilo and the Freshwater Aquaculture Center, Central Luzon State University, Muñoz, Nueva Ecija. Both centers produced numerous researches on aquaculture. He also served as Chief of SEAFDEC-AQD from 1979 to 1980.
Dr. Juliano is a member of 21 learned, professional, and honor organizations. Among which are the University of the Philippines Zoological Society; Philippine Association for the Advancement of Science; Phycological Society of the Philippines; Society of the Sigma Xi, Stanford University Chapter; American Fisheries Society; American Society of Limnology and Oceanography; Marine Biological Society of India; National Research Council of the Philippines; and Philippine Association for the Advancement of Scientific Information Communication.
Dr. Juliano is very much concerned on the fishery education in the country. So whenever he has a chance to expose his views on the matter, he would always points out what should be done to improve this problem. According to him, fisheries education is beset with so many problems. That is the reason why the country is not producing high caliber fisheries graduates who can lead in the development of our fishery resources. Some of these problems, which Dr. Juliano has cited, are as follows:
There are too many fisheries schools in the Philippines. To date, there are 33 state colleges and universities offering fisheries degrees; 13 tertiary schools (higher technical-vocational school); 28 secondary schools (technical-vocational). Because of this, there is a mismatch of fisheries graduates and employment. Aside from that, because of too many schools to finance, there is insufficient fund to support faculty development; physical expansion; library and multi-media development, and other important needs of the schools. To upset this problem, Dr. Juliano suggests the stopping of the conversion of secondary fisheries schools to tertiary level and adopt a flagship model contained in the National Agricultural Education System. With this concept, the government will select a number of secondary and tertiary schools and which will be fully supported by the government. These institutions will eventually produce top caliber and well-rounded fisheries graduates. They in turn will lead in the development of fisheries in the country.
"Fisheries as a career is not as attractive and glamorous as the other professions such as law, medicine, or commerce. The opportunities for employment and entrepreneurship are not well known to the people except for the people in the fisheries industry. The over-supply of below standard graduates from many schools of fisheries who are unemployed and neither involved in fisheries, makes fisheries a hopeless career to the eyes of others." To solve this problem, Dr. Juliano suggests that fisheries curriculum should be revised to expose students more to actual industry/field experiences, especially in the undergraduate level. He also suggests that "fisheries as a career should be government-regulated profession as a means of forcing fisheries schools to upgrade their standard. Passing a board examination prior to being allowed to practice fisheries profession can be required, like in the medical technology and veterinary professions. This will eliminate substandard schools if their graduates can not pass the board examination and can not obtain employment." The professionalization of fisheries career is now incorporated in Section 115 of the Philippine Fisheries Code of 1998 (RA 8550). Although this law stipulates that the first Board Examination for B.S. Fisheries shall be conducted within one year from the date of approval of this Code, but so far no such examination has been conducted. The Code was approved on February 25, 1998.
Most of the reading materials used for fisheries courses are temperate and western oriented, hence many of the examples given are not relevant to the actual needs of the Filipino students. To combat this, fisheries textbooks should be written by Filipinos using tropical fisheries principles and with Philippine examples.
Since sending people abroad for a doctoral degree in fisheries is very expensive, Dr. Juliano suggests that UP in the Visayas should develop its PhD program in fisheries to strengthen its manpower base for research and education.
At present, the UPV College of Fisheries is offering a PhD in Aquaculture.
The last time I met Dr. Juliano was in 1997. At that time, he told me he was jobless. I know of course that he was very busy with his consultancy works. He is the Executive Director and Member/Secretary, Board of Trustees of Coastal Management Center, a non-stock, non-profit organization. It is located in Ortigas Center, Pasig City.
That’s Dr. Rogelio O. Juliano, the generous achiever.

Bibliography
Juliano, Rogelio O. 1996. "Fisheries Education in the Philippines: History, Status, problems, Needs and Recommendations for Changes." In: Fortes, R. D. and L. C. Catedrilla, eds. Philippine Fisheries policy: towards sustainable Development of fisheries Resources. (Proceedings of the National Seminar-Workshop on the Evaluation and Review of Philippine Fisheries Policy, September 27-28, 1993, ISMED, UP Diliman, Quezon City). Miag-ao, Iloilo: UP Visayas, pp. 101-12.
Juliano, Rogelio. 1997. "Curriculum Vitae". 20p.
Personal Interview with Dr. R. O. Juliano, October 17, 1997.
Sarenas, Artemio. 1973. "Introduction of the Guest Lecturer: Dean Rogelio O. Juliano." In: The Dr. Gregorio T.
Velasquez Lecture Series, 1972-1975: Challenge to Biologists in the 70s: the Escalation of food production, ed. By Magdalena Cantoria. Quezon City: National Research Council of the Philippines, pp. 51-53.




Guillermo Luzada Ablan: A Pioneer in Diwal Fisheries
By Melchor F. Cichon
July 3, 2006

One of the earliest Filipino fisheries scientists is Guillermo L. Ablan.
A native of Dagupan City, he rose from the rank.
By the time he retired from office, he was the Regional Director of Region I of the Philippine Fisheries Commission in Dagutan City. This commission is the present Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR).
Director Ablan was born in Laoag, Ilocos Norte on February 7, 1904. His parents were Gregorio Ablan and Anastacia Luzada. He was married to Susana Nonato in 1945.
A B.S. in fisheries graduate, Director Ablan took his master of science at the University of Washington in 1932.
Immediately upon his return from his studies abroad, he worked as Junior Scientist, 1932-1933, at the Philippine Fisheries Commission and rose to become a Regional Director, Philippine Fisheries Commission, in Region 1.
Between these years, Director Ablan conducted various researches on Philippine fishes, bivalves, oysters and published them in various periodicals. His pamphlet, The Commercial Production of Oysters in the Philippines, is one of the most used materials on oyster.
But his most famous pioneering work is on diwal fishery.
According to him, "the diwal is locally considered the most healthful; and delicious among the shell foods found in this locality (Pontevedra, Occidental Negros), not excepting the oyster. It is of good flavor, either raw or prepared, and has a large amount of meat compared with other bivalves. Therefore the diwal is in great demand, not only in the local markets but also in other markets of the Philippines.
An that time, 1938, he had already observed that the supply of diwal or angelwings (Pholas orientalis (Bivalvia: Pholadidae) fishery in Occidental Negros was diminishing due to the growing communities with increasing populations and industrial plants, such as sugar centrals and rice mills. He therefore suggested that water pollution from these establishments be controlled.
His warning came true in the years to come.
In 2001, E. T. Marasigan and L. V. Laureta of the University of the Philippines said that "the high demand for angelwings, (Pholas (Monothyra) orientalis locally known as diwal in Panay and Negros islands in Central Philippines resulted in the overexploitation of the species. The once dense beds are now almost devoid of this resource."
Luckily, thru the initiative of the officials of Capiz and with the technical help of Dr. Laureta, diwal fishery was rehabilitated.

Here are Ablan’s publications:

Ablan , Guillermo L. April 1940. Two new Philippine gobioids. Philippine Journal of Science 71(4): 373-379. Table. 2 plates, 3 refs.
Ablan , Guillermo L., Jose R. Montilla and Basilio M. Martin July 1940. The salt-making industry of Northwestern Luzon. Philippine Journal of Science, 72 (3): 319-329, graphs, tables, plates.
Ablan, Guillermo L. and Godofredo L. Alcasid. August 1938 Two species of Piana apparently new to the Philippines. Philippine journal of Science. 66 (4): 497-499. Plate.
Ablan, Guillermo L. 1934. Breeding habits of the Siamese fighting fish, Betta splendens. Agricultural Life Magazine.
Ablan, Guillermo L. 1949. The commercial production of oysters in the Philippines. Manila, Bureau of Printing. 27p. map, tables, 14 plates, 10 refs. (Philippines (Republic) Dept. Of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Popular Bulletin no. 26)
Ablan, Guillermo L. and Westremundo M. Rosario. April 1961. Teuthid fish for marine culture in the Philippines. Fisheries Gazette 5(4): 23-24.
Ablan, Guillermo L. and Westremundo M. Rosario. Jan. 1962. Method of collecting and transporting live teuthid fry (padas) for stocking. Fisheries Gazette 6(1):6-8, 36, 31.
Ablan, Guillermo L. July 1938. The diwal fishery of Occidental Negros. Philippine Journal of Science 66(3): 379-385. Tables, 2 plates.
Ablan, Guillermo L. July-Dec 1953. Lattice method of oyster culture. Philippine Journal of Fisheries, 2(2):191-195.
Ablan, Guillermo L. July-Dec 1953. Two Philippine boring mollusks. Philippine Journal of Fisheries 2(2):191-195.
Herre, Albert W. and Guillermo L. Ablan. June 1934. Aplocheilus luzonensis, a new Philippine cyprinodont. Philippine Journal of Science 54 (2): 275-277. plates 6 refs.
Hilario A. Roxas and Guillermo L. Ablan. June 1938. A new taenioid fish from Occidental Negros. Philippine Journal of Science 66 ( 2): 261-265. Plates, 6 refs.
Luzon. Guillermo L. Ablan and Guillermo J. Blanco. August 1938. A rare parasite crab new to Pangasinan province. Philippine Journal of Science 66(2): 217-219. Table, plate, ref.
Roxas, A. Roxas and Guillermo L. Ablan. Jan. 1940. A new fish from Lingayen Gulf, Philippines. Philippine Journal of Science 70 (1): 77-79. Plate, 3 refs.
Ablan, Guillermo L. and Guillermo J. Blanco. A rare parasitic crab new to Pangasinan province.

Director Ablan was a member of the following societies and organizations:
American Association for the Advancement of Science
Fisheries Society of the Philippines
International Association of Lions Club (charter member)
International Cooperation Society of the Philippines
Men of Science, Dutch East Indies
National Research Council of the Philippines
Pangasinan Department of Agriculture and Natural Resources Employees Association (chairman, 1965)
Pangasinan Oyster Farmers Association, Member, Board of Directors, 1965
Phi Sigma (Biological Honor Society)
Philippine Association for the Advancement of Research
Philippine FAO Fellows Association
Philippine Phycological Society
Sigma XI (Scientific Society)
For his distinguished career in fisheries, Director Ablan received the following awards:
Man of the Year in Fisheries. Bureau of Fisheries, 1953
ICA-NRC travel grant to various countries of Southeast Asia, 1956.
Source
Bio-data of Guillermo L. Ablan. Typewritten. No date.
Ablan, Guillermo L. July 1938. The diwal fishery of Occidental Negros. Philippine Journal of Science 66(3): 379-385.
Marasigan, E. T. and L. V. Laureta. 2001. Broodstock maintenance and early gonadal maturation of Pholas orientalis (bivalvia:Pholadidae). Journal of Shellfish Research 20(3):1095-1099.



Prof. Prudencia V. Conlu:
Ichthyologist Par Excellence
By
Melchor F. Cichon
Otolith, April-June 1995, p. 7.

Do you know that one of the most prominent ichthyologists in the Philippine is an Aklanon?
She is no other than Prof. Prudencia V. Conlu, a retired professor and former dean of the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, University of the Philippines in the Visayas, Miag-ao, Iloilo.
She began as an instructor in ichthyology in the College in 1961 until she rose to the position of full professor in 1981. She also held various administrative positions in the CFOS the latest of which was as dean from 1992 to 1995.
Prof. Conlu was born in Ibajay, Aklan on April 27, 1930. She earned a degree of Bachelor of Science in Education, major in Biology in 1952 at the University of Sto. Tomas (UST) in Manila. In 1957, she took a special training course in Marine Taxonomy (fishes) and Planktology as a UNESCO fellow at the Oceanographic Institute, Nhanrang, Vietnam. She obtained her Master of Science in Zoology degree at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia as a Colombo Plan Fellow in 1961. Again in 1964, Prof. Conlu became a UNESCO fellow in Advanced Courses in Marine Biology: Marine Invertebrates and Fish and Fisheries at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.
As an ichthyologist, she was instrumental in the establishment of the College of Fisheries Museum and has written various scientific and technical papers including two landmark books on Philippine fishes. These are the Guide to Philippine Flora and Fauna (Fishes), vol IX, published by NRMC, Ministry of Natural Resources and the University of the Philippines in 1986 and Guide to Philippine Flora and Fauna (Fishes), vol 1, published by MNR-UPNSRC project funds, in 1982. Also, in recognition of her expertise in fisheries, she has been asked as external examiner for many graduate school theses of universities in the Philippines and abroad.
For her valued contributions for the development of fisheries and fisheries education in the Philippines, Prof. Conlu received 16 citations and awards from various organizations in the country. Some of these are the Likas Yaman Award given by the Ministry of Natural Resources and the Pride of Heritage Award as Outstanding Educator of the International Press Research Development Progress. She was also the first to be given the Trident Award as the Most Outstanding College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences Faculty by the UP Fisheries Guild of the UP in the Visayas.
She is a member of 19 national and internationally recognized learned societies, professional and scientific organizations like Phi Sigma Biological Honor Society Alpha Chi, Chapter of UP, the New York Academy of Science, and the American Society of Ichthyologist and Herpetologists.
Prof. Conlu retired from the government service one month after her 65th birthday last May 27, 1995. Her colleagues and those she had worked with will always remember her as the lady whose deep love for fishes was expressed through dedication and hard work in her chosen career.



Liberato Vallejos Laureta: A Total Fisheries Scientist
By
Melchor F. Cichon
June 2005

At times success is not what we dreamt of.
He never dreamed of becoming a fisheries scientist. He wanted to become an accountant.
And so Dr. Liberato Vallejos Laureta became a fisheries scientist by accident.
Because of poverty, his father advised him to take up fisheries at the College of Fisheries, U.P. Diliman, principally because there was no tuition fees for fisheries students then.
But he never had loved fisheries even after he had finished his master’s in fisheries. He started to appreciate fisheries only after he got his Ph. D. and started to conduct a research where he was the project director.
After finishing elementary school at San Agustin Elementary School in Castillejos, Zambales in 1964, Jhon, as he is fondly called by his colleagues, proceeded to Zambales National Agricultural School for his secondary education.
Unknowingly, his mind was being led to fisheries. So when he graduated from high school he applied for a scholarship to the UP College of Fisheries in Diliman, Quezon City. And luckily, he passed it. Eventually, he became a Iskular ng Bayan.
He took a Bachelor of Science in Fisheries, majoring in Inland Fisheries and graduated in 1973. Immediately after graduation, he was hired as a Fish
Technician at the Eel Farm of Showa-United Food, Inc. in Mariveles, Bataan.
But he was not satisfied with his work. He wanted to expand his knowledge and skill, so he applied for a work at his Alma Mater, the UP College of Fisheries, now the UPV College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences. He was taken in as a Research Assistant I at the Institute of Fisheries Development and Research, the research and extension arm of the UP College of Fisheries.
He must have been very efficient and effective researcher because he was always promoted. After a year of being a Research Assistant (RA) I, he was promoted to RA II. Then in 1978, he was again promoted to RA IV, and in 1982 he became a Research Associate IV. Then in 1986, he was promoted to Researcher II.
After coming home from his study leave for his doctorate degree, Jhon was reclassified into a faculty with a rank of Assistant Professor IV. Now he is Associate Professor III, a rank given to a faculty who has completed a lot of researches, undergone a series of extension and community services, and has published in international journals. Beside that, he must have won awards.
So what is his secret?
Higher education.
While he was going up the professional ladder, Jhon continued his studies, first by taking a master’s degree in aquaculture at the UP College of Fisheries, as a PCARRD Scholar. Being a dedicated student, he became a College Scholar, and finished the degree in 1982.
Not contented with it, he took a master degree in Business Administration at the Central Philippine University, in Jaro, Iloilo. But he just completed 30 units.
Then a great break came to him: He was given a scholarship through the UPV-World Bank Scholar Program of the University of the Philippines in the Visayas to take a doctorate degree in marine biology with a major in benthic ecology at the University of Liverpool, England. So when he came back to the Philippines with a PhD degree, he was reclassified from Researcher II to Assistant Professor IV.
To become a UP professor one has be good in the tripartite functions of the university: to teach, to conduct research, and to serve the community ins the form of extension and community service.
In all these functions, Jhon is on top.
As a faculty, Jhon often gets excellent remarks from his students both in the undergraduate and the graduate levels.
As a researcher, Jhon has conducted 13 researches, and has written scientific articles, some of which have been published in peer-reviewed journals. His current researches focus on angel wings, a bivalve that is becoming rare in Western Visayas.
Here are some of his unpublished researches.
Laureta, L., U. Focken and K. Becker. 2000. Growth and metabolic responses of milkfish fingerlings (Chanos chanos) fed with composed diets under controlled condition.
Laureta, L. and Marasigan, E. 1998. The ecology and reproductive biology of the angel wings, Phoilas orientalis. Project supported by the Fisheries Sector Program of the Department of Agriculture.
Marasigan, E. and Laureta, L. 1998. Broodstock maintenance and induced spawning of Pholas orientalis. Project supported by the Fisheries Sector Program of the Department of Agriculture.
Laureta, L. and Santos-Garibay, S. 1998. The kapis industry of the Philippines with emphasis on its biology in Batan Bay, Aklan.
Laureta, I. V. The trophic dynamics of a benthic community off the west coast of the Isle of Man with particular reference to the ecological energies of Corbula gibba (Olivi). Ph.D. dissertation, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, England.
To date, June 2005, Jhon had published five scientific papers and a monograph. Three of these papers were published in peer-reviewed journals, two of which received awards.
Here are his published works:
Marasigan, E. T. and L. V. Laureta. 2001. Broodstock maintenance and early gonadal maturation of the angelwings, Pholas orientalis (Bivalvia: Pholadidae). Journal of Shellfish Research 20(3):1095-1099.
Laureta, L. V. and E. T. Marasigan. 2000. Habitat and reprodutctive biology of angelwings, Pholas orientalis (Gmelin). Journal of Shellfish Research 19(2):19-22.
Laureta, L. V. Catedrilla, L. and Cichon, M. eds. 1996. IA Research Abstracts: 1982-1994. Institute of Aquaculture, College of Fisheries, U.P. in the Visayas, Iloilo. 101p.
Laureta, L. V., Marasigan, A. N. and Melgar, R. 1992. (abstract). "A Study on the Reproduction and Spawning of Placuna sella." Proceedings of the Second National Symposium in Marine Science held at Mindanao State University, Tawi-Tawi, November 1992.
Taki, V., Saclauso, C. Laureta, L., Ohno, T., Kohno, Y. and Morioka, S. 1989. "Survival of milkfish fry on the surf zone." In: Proceedings of the Second Asian Fisheries Society Forum held in Tokyo, Japan, March 1989.
Carreon,, J., Laureta, L., Estocapio, F. and Abalos, T. 1984. Milkfish seedling survival in raceways of freshwater recirculating systems. Aquaculture 36:256-272.
Jhon has rendered extension and community services. On March 14 and 15, 2002, Jhon led the coastal assessment survey and evaluation of possible establishment of rehabilitation project for the diwal Pholas orientalis in Pontevedra, Negros Occidental. On October 3-4, 1999, he served as a resource evaluator during the ocular inspection and area assessment of Sigay shellfish in Sipalay, Negros Occidental under the support of UP Ugnayan Pahinungod and the Negros Occidental Provincial government.
But two of the most significant extension works Jhon has ever undertaken was when he served as program coordinator for the training of 18 Iranian aquaculturists on "shrimp Grow-Out management held at the Brackishwater Aquaculture Center, College of Fisheries, U.P. in the Visayas, Leganes, Iloilo on November 20, 1993 to January 17, 1994. The other one was when he served a program coordinator on the seminar workshop for the 156 fishpond owners and caretakers in Pangasinan on "culture of prawn, milkfish and groupers" held at the College of Fisheries, Pangasinan State University, Binmaley, Pangasinan on April 28-30, 1994.
When you are good enough, people cannot afford to ignore you, especially those people who are concern with the future of the industry.
As a scientist, Jhon is not just good enough, he is in fact one of the best young Filipino fisheries scientists today.
In recognition of his achievements, Dr. Laureta has received 12 awards and scholarship grants from 1979 to 2003. The most recent of which was the DOST-Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Core University Exchange research Scientist to conduct research visit in Japan (September 1-20, 2002). On February 28, 2001, he was a recipient of the International Publication Award in 2000 by the University of the Philippines handed to him by the President of the University of the Philippines. In 1999, Dr. Laureta won the Best Unpublished Research Paper by the Bureau of Agricultural Research, Department of Agriculture. Before this, he also received the Dr. Elvira O. Tan Memorial Award for Best Published Research Paper in Aquaculture. The award was given by PCMARD.
When a faculty is endowed with extraordinary talents, his dean expects so much from that person. And Dr. Laureta was given additional works.
From 2000 to 2005, Dr. Laureta was the Station Head of the Brackishwater Aquaculture Center, Institute of Aquaculture, College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences, U.P. in the Visayas, Leganes, Iloilo.
In September 2001, Dr. Laureta was the Co-Chair of the Committee that conceptualized and formulated training or extension program for the Institute of Aquaculture. On the same year, he was a member of the Committee on CFOS Curriculum Review.
Looking back, Jhon has not regretted for having studied fisheries despite his being away from his hometown. His longing to his parents and brothers and sisters are being filled up by the presence of his loving and supportive wife, the former Ms. Elma Mogote Maca and their two children, Elmer and Michael Jun.

Part Two: Articles on Philippine Fisheries

Muro Ami, the Fishing Gear

By

Melchor F. Cichon
August 29, 2005

This writer is very grateful that the muro ami, the fishing gear, has been banned in the Philippines. this is specified in Sec. 92 of the Philippine fisheries Code of 1998 (RA 8550), which says that:

Sec. 92. ban on Muro-ami, Other Methods and Gear Destructive to Coral Reefs and Other Marine Habitat. It shall be unlawful for any person, natural or juridical, to fish with gear method that destroys coral reefs, seagrass beds, and other fishery marine life habitat as may be determined by the Deaprtment. "Muro-Ami" and any of its variation, ansd such similar gear and methods that require diving, other physical or mechanical ascts pound the coral reefs and other habitat to entrap, gather or catch fish and other fishery species are also prohibited."

But it cannot be denied that this fishing gear is one of the most productive fishing gears in the country.

If we look at the fisheries statistics, muro ami was the top four fishing gears in the country before the 1981s.

Fishing Gears…..Production (in kilograms)

Purse seine…..168,918,000
Bag net…..107,229,000
Ring net …..39,774,000
Muro ami…..10,058,000
Hook and line….. 5,923,000
Push net …..5,336,000
Gill net…..2,350,000
Round hawl seine …..1,817,000
Long line…..1,170,000
Beach seine…..510,000

Despite its great production and the number of fishermen it employed, muro ami was also one of the most controversial fishing gears in our country. It contributed in the destruction of coral reefs.

According to Tacio, this drive-in net was introduced by the Okinawan fishermen before World War II. It is used for fishing in coral reefs. It has two long wings which are driven by divers to lead the fish to the main net. It has vertical scarelines weighed down by stones or chain links that create noise or disturbance on the corals. This drives out the fish from the coral reef to the net.

According to Dr. Angel Alcala, each muro-ami uses 10 to 150 swimmers that use scare lines attached to an oval rock weighing 4 to 5 kg. The swimmers repeatedly drop the rocks on hard corals as they move towards the bag net. This procedure creates noise and disturbance at the sea bottom, driving schooling and bottom-dwelling fish towards the bag-net, but in the process, it breaks branching and other delicate hard corals.

The divers are usually children wearing nothing but a pair of goggles.

Because of this system, much coral fishes are caught, and much corals are also destroyed.
Below is the production of muro ami since 1949 up to 1987. After 1987, no production of this fishing gear has been reported because the Philippine government has banned it.

Year…..Production (in kg)
1949...1,485,260
1950...331,905
1951...693,942
1952...14,490
1953...85,509
1954...532,308
1955..2,109,777
1956...5,874,465
1957...11,738,835
1958...10,045,524
1959...7,750,880
1960...9,572,740
1961...9,362,490
1962...10,878,010
1963...11,622,240
1964...18,320,720
1965...14,160,000
1966...11,722,280
1967...10,246,320
1968...16,641,960
1969...19,307,480
1970...16,832,480
1971...17,893,520
1972...16,827,140
1973...26,475,000
1974...24,033,730
1975...18,992,400
1976...13,799,970
1977...10,523,000
1978...6,283,000
1979...11,671,000
1980...Not available(na)
1981...10,058,000
1982...10,367,000
1983...8,694,000
1984...na
1985...na
1986...na
1987...11,491,000

According to a report, marine biologists Ken Carpenter and Angel Alcala conducted a study on muro-ami in l977 and they found out that "50 divers operating the gear could damage as much as l7 square meters per hectare of coral reef per operation. A muro-ami fishing boat usually operates 3-4 times in a fishing season.

While he admitted that muro-ami is an effective fishing gear, Dr Rafael D.Guerrero III of the Philippine Council for Aquatic and Marine Research and Development cited some dis-advantages.

"The problems related to muro-ami fishing are its employment of minors (young boys) for fishing, their exposure to health hazards (like the "bends" or narcosis) and the destruction of coral reefs because of the weighted scarelines."

What happens if the corals are destroyed? Definitely, there will no more shelter area and feeding place for fishes, and so they have to look for another feeding place. That is if they have not been caught yet, and if there are still available coral reefs.

As of 1990, only about 5% of our coral reefs are in excellent condition; the rest are either in fair to poor condition.

It was said that the Philippine coral reefs provide food and shelter to as many 2,000 fish species living in it.
It also serves as a buffer against the impact of waves.

Some plants and animals that live in coral reefs are sources of anti-cancer drugs and valuable products.
Lastly, coral reefs attract tourists.

Looking back, perhaps the government should devise a scheme that would utilize the same principle being used in muro-ami in catching fish, except that the dragging device is not stone or metal so that the coral reefs would not be destroyed. Perhaps sound waves from other devices would be developed to scare away fishes from the coral reefs.

An alternative fishing gear was devised, the pa-aling, to replace muro-ami. But it was also found out that it is as destructive as the muro-ami.

This writer does not know if this fishing gear was also banned. If it is not, then it is high time that it should be.

Sources

Henrylito D. Tacio. "Where has all the coral gone?" http://www.peopleandplanet.net/doc.php?id=1716&PHPSESSID=26aa907ad49570378b63f1c4cae97fb5, retrieved: June 21, 2005)
Hall, Howard. " Muro Ami." http://www.howardhall.com/stories/muro_ami.html. retrieved: June 21, 2005
"Our coral reefs." PCMRD Currents. August 1999.
Philippine News Agency. "Human folly blamed for coral reef destruction in RP Environmental." 
***********

Guimaras Strait: Focusing on Fish Production

By Melchor F. Cichon
September 13, 2006

The oil spill in Guimaras Province has been the talk of the town since the oil spill tragedy on August 11, 2006.

And people all over the world have been following this.

So what is the big deal about this incidence particularly to Filipinos?

As of September 9, 2006, according to the Ligtas Guimaras group, of the four municipalities of Guimaras, only the municipality of Buenavista has not been affected by the oil spill. Of the 40 barangays of Guimaras, 26 have been affected that also include 4,533 families and 22,665 persons.

Let us also focus on the fish production of Guimaras Strait.

Guimaras Strait is located between the provinces of Guimaras and Negros Occidental, and one of the most productive fishing grounds in the Philippines.

How this oil spill will affect the fish production of this fishing ground, we cannot at the moment say anything, except to pray that the damage will not be tremendous. For sure, some of the foods of fishes found in this fishing grounds like planktons will be killed by the toxin found in oil slick. With less food would mean less fishes that will strive in the area.

If we look at the productions of Guimaras Strait since 1953 (that is the oldest record this writer could get) up to 2000, we can say that Guimaras strait has been producing tons of fishes. The online news report in the BAR Chronicle vol. 5, no. 4, April 1-30, 2004) states that the average total annual fish production of Guimaras is 50, 000 metric tons.

Here is the part of that news item:

"The study (three-year project entitled, Ocean Color for Sustainable Fisheries (OCSF) funded by the Bureau of Agricultural Research of the Department of Agriculture (DA-BAR ) ) also identified the most productive fishing grounds that have an average of annual fisheries production of 50,000 metric tons and above. These are the: Moro Gulf, East Sulu Sea, Visayan Sea, South Sulu Sea, Visayan Sea, Bohol Sea, and Guimaras Strait. These areas contribute to one-half of the total annual fish production in the country. " (The title of the study supplied)
For a clearer view of the annual fish production of Guimaras Strait from 1953 to 2000, I patiently copied the commercial annual fish production of Guimaras Strait from the Philippine Fisheries Statistics and the Philippine Fisheries Profile since 1953 to 2000. This is what I got:

Year……Production (in kg)

1953…4,336,488
1954…4,781,920
1955…6,800,961
1956…6,800,961
1957…Not available
1958…7,010,646
1959…5,778,960
1960…5,785,110
1961…5,691,780
1962…4,896,300
1963…5,686,020
1964…10,853,000
1965…12,075,400
1966…9,853,720
1967…13,055,560
1968…10,856,320
1969…1,012,040
1970…2,248,960
1971…3,236,120
1972…4,513,480
1973…3,843,570
1974…2,743,130
1975…6,729,740
1976…5,607,290
1977…8,201,000
1978…10,215,000
1979…9,943,000
1980…6,137,000
1981…5,618,000
1982…12,514,000
1983…5,441,000
1984…5,586,000
1985…Not available
1986…6,969,000
1987…6,588,000
1988…uses the 1987 data
1989…12,547,000 (estimate)
1990…13,796,000
1991…3,782,000
1992…15,144,000
1993…29,687,00
1994…30,209,000
1995…24,163,000
1996-2000…use the 1995 data

What are the fishes found in Guimaras Strait?

Based on the Fisheries Statistics issued by the Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources, these are some of the commercial fishes and other aquatic resources in this fishing ground:

Barracuda,Cavalla,Clams,Cockles,Crevalle,Dolphin fish,Flounders, Flying fish,Fusilies,Glassfish, Goatfish,Goby,
Grouper,Jacks,Jelly fish, Lizard fish, Marine turtle,Milkffish,Mojarra, Moonfish, Moray, Mullets, Mussels, Scallops, Oysters, Perchlet, Scads, Sea bass, Sea catfish, Sea cucumber, Sea perches, Sea urchins, Seaweeds, Shads,Sickle fish, Siganids, Sillago, Slipmouth, Snappers, Spade fish, Sponges, Surgeon fish, Threadfin, Wrasses, and other aquatic plants.

Source:
Philippine Fisheries Statistics, and Philippine Fisheries Profile, from 1953 to 2000.
http://www.bar.gov.ph/barchronicle/2004/apr04_1-30_gisthefuture.asp